Atkins - BIG Surprise???




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JerseyGyrl
07-16-2008, 08:30 PM
Not only did low carb beat out low -fat & a Mediterranean-style diet for weight loss but...the low carb diet improved cholesterol better than those 2 as well:) BIG surprise huh??...ummmm, no, not really!:smug:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/25708495


betsysunqueen
07-16-2008, 08:35 PM
It's interesting that the low-carb dieters were encouraged to choose vegetarian sources of fat and protein. I'd be interested in seeing what their meal plans looked like.

snapless
07-16-2008, 08:44 PM
I'm low carb and eat a lot more vegetables than meat. Just because people SAY Atkins is all about bacon, cheese and steak doesn't mean it really is. Anyone who has read Dr. Atkins books would know better.

Off-topic: Kim I got so excited when I saw that this morning on the TV at the gym. I was going to post it for you but you beat me to the punch! :p


kaplods
07-16-2008, 09:18 PM
About a year ago, I had a consult with the doctor heading our local weight management clinic (excellent reputation, but I couldn't afford it - still she gave me a lot of advice that really changed my life, so my consultation was worth the cost of the entire program to me, and I didn't have to pay anything for it).

She told me to expect more and more research coming out vindicating Atkins and other low-carb food plans (she and her husband each lost abot 100 lbs on low carb), when they're done appropriately. It's cool to see.

snapless
07-16-2008, 09:24 PM
My doctor wholeheartedly approved my food change. I had blood work and a urinalysis done before I started and it showed high cholesterol among other things.

I had another done after 6 weeks of diet/exercise change and it showed a significant improvement.

I'm actually scheduled to go back in for another blood workup on Monday. Will let you all know how it goes.

SoulBliss
07-16-2008, 09:37 PM
I found the 2 segments very interesting:

"The new study's results favored the Atkins-like approach less when subgroups such as diabetics and women were examined.

Among the 36 diabetics, only those on the Mediterranean diet lowered blood sugar levels. Among the 45 women, those on the Mediterranean diet lost the most weight."
So, women and diabetics need wine and olive oil? :D Who knew? ;)


"The heart association has long recommended low-fat diets to reduce heart risks, but some of its leaders have noted the Mediterranean diet has also proven safe and effective.

The heart association recommends a low-fat diet even more restrictive than the one in the study, said Dr. Robert Eckel, the association's past president who is a professor of medicine at the University of Colorado-Denver.

It does not recommend the Atkins diet. However, a low-carb approach is consistent with heart association guidelines so long as there are limitations on the kinds of saturated fats often consumed by people on the Atkins diet, Eckel said."

I wonder why the low fat group wasn't put on a diet more in alignment with the AHA recommendations and I wonder what the results would have been if they had.

Cheree
07-16-2008, 09:58 PM
I am tending to eat along the lines of a Mediterranean diet, so cool (I still need to work on increasing my vegetable intake, which I'm doing). However, I don't think I'm getting in enough wine...I need to work on that. Seems like wine would be better than drinking grape juice. :) Wouldn't grape juice (depending on the sugar content) spike a sugar response more than wine?

JerseyGyrl
07-16-2008, 10:20 PM
when they're done appropriately.

This is exactly what I have been preaching for years! Appropriately is the key!!

Suzanne 3FC
07-16-2008, 11:19 PM
This was an interesting study, mainly because the low carb group was advised to choose vegetarian sources of fat and protein, which is healthier.

It might also be interesting to note that the Mediterranean diet resulted in virtually the same amount of weight loss as the low carb diet with just a third of a pound difference overall. Also, the low carb diet had the highest fallout rate with 78% adherence, and the Med diet had 85% adherence. Wouldn't this mean the Mediterranean diet is a better choice? :shrug:

However, it's still a very depressing study no matter which plan you choose. Like most similar studies before it, the so called 'success' is dismal. Average weight loss was just 10lbs over the course of two whole years! :( That's not a glowing testimonial to any of the diets studied.

betsysunqueen
07-17-2008, 03:08 AM
I'm low carb and eat a lot more vegetables than meat. Just because people SAY Atkins is all about bacon, cheese and steak doesn't mean it really is. Anyone who has read Dr. Atkins books would know better.



Hey, I'm not sure if this was directed at me, but I wasn't trying to imply that Atkins was "all about bacon, cheese and steak" at all. I've actually read Dr. Atkins' book. However, without making an over-arching statement about the whole way of life, when you do look at the Induction list, there are relatively few non-animal sources of fat and protein. I realize that Induction is only a two-week period, but I would venture to say that a substantial portion of people on this plan get the majority of their protein from animal sources. That's why that part of the article caught my eye.

betsysunqueen
07-17-2008, 03:10 AM
I wonder why the low fat group wasn't put on a diet more in alignment with the AHA recommendations and I wonder what the results would have been if they had.

That's what I wondered as well. It isn't really a test of a low-fat diet if the "low-fat" group wasn't really on a low-fat diet. They barely reduced the amount of fat in their diet at all.

snapless
07-17-2008, 06:56 AM
Hey, I'm not sure if this was directed at me

Sorry didn't mean to come across as if it was directed at you, it was more just a general statement after listening to the news report and hearing the female reporter Ann Curry say, "We're not talking talking about the Atkins diet that involves bacon, cheese and steak. so what exactly are we talking about?"

I just seem to be having one of those days where every post I write comes out wrong and offends someone. Sorry if it did.

JerseyGyrl
07-17-2008, 09:40 AM
"We're not talking about the Atkins diet that involves bacon, cheese and steak. so what exactly are we talking about?"


The report on MSNBC & CBS stated the low carb diet that was represented as "Atkins" was meatless or very limited meat. In addition, vegetarian sources of fat & protein:shrug::shrug::shrug: This definitely is not Atkins. Sounda more like vegetarian low carb to me.

And 10 lbs. over 2 years...ummm, if they were following true Atkins appropriately...it would have been much more!

junebug41
07-17-2008, 10:23 AM
This was an interesting study, mainly because the low carb group was advised to choose vegetarian sources of fat and protein, which is healthier.

It might also be interesting to note that the Mediterranean diet resulted in virtually the same amount of weight loss as the low carb diet with just a third of a pound difference overall. Also, the low carb diet had the highest fallout rate with 78% adherence, and the Med diet had 85% adherence. Wouldn't this mean the Mediterranean diet is a better choice? :shrug:

However, it's still a very depressing study no matter which plan you choose. Like most similar studies before it, the so called 'success' is dismal. Average weight loss was just 10lbs over the course of two whole years! :( That's not a glowing testimonial to any of the diets studied.


I think it's also worthwhile to note that according to a follow-up newsweek article, the low fat diet wasn't really all that low fat. They lowered the fat intake by only 3%. I think this is a weird study and according to the author, partly funded by the Atkins organization.

http://www.newsweek.com/id/146641

It's important to note that Dr. Ornish isn't necessarily anti-Atkins or low-carb, but he was critical of this study in particular.

snapless
07-17-2008, 11:56 AM
The report on MSNBC & CBS stated the low carb diet that was represented as "Atkins" was meatless or very limited meat. In addition, vegetarian sources of fat & protein:shrug::shrug::shrug: This definitely is not Atkins. Sounda more like vegetarian low carb to me.

And 10 lbs. over 2 years...ummm, if they were following true Atkins appropriately...it would have been much more!



Oh I agree Kim. It was just the way she came across (to me) that kind of bugged me...the way she said it seemed like she was implying that Atkins was all about bacon, cheese and steak. Anyway, that's why I made the post I did and partially why it sounded a bit cranky. :(

KLK
07-17-2008, 12:06 PM
Right. I don't eat beef, poultry, lamb, pork and I'm still able to follow a low-carb diet by getting most of my protein/fat from vegetable sources, some fish, olive oil and dairy. I thought I was "doing it wrong" by not eating meat (despite my results so far) so it's good to read that it not only can be done without meat but it's also recommended.


This was an interesting study, mainly because the low carb group was advised to choose vegetarian sources of fat and protein, which is healthier.

SoulBliss
07-17-2008, 12:09 PM
Right. I don't eat beef, poultry, lamb, pork and I'm still able to follow a low-carb diet by getting most of my protein/fat from vegetable sources, some fish, olive oil and dairy. I thought I was "doing it wrong" by not eating meat (despite my results so far) so it's good to read that it not only can be done without meat but it's also recommended.

I got more than adequate protein doing a vegan low carb diet and lost MORE weight than ever and had lots of other benefits to the way of eating too. It's entirely possible to eat a low carb diet and be 100% plant based.

mamaspank
07-17-2008, 12:11 PM
Anyone catch the Today show this morning? They said that this study had quite a few flaws, including the fact that it was funded by the Atkins Foundation and that the lower fat diet didn't lower the fat much at all.

junebug41
07-17-2008, 12:14 PM
I got more than adequate protein doing a vegan low carb diet and lost MORE weight than ever and had lots of other benefits to the way of eating too. It's entirely possible to eat a low carb diet and be 100% plant based.

:cp:

We need a thumbs up smiley. But I agree.

ETA: Mamaspank- I didn't catch that. Did they have Dr. Ornish on? There was an article on newsweek.com (I linked it earlier in this thread) that argued those points.

mamaspank
07-17-2008, 12:27 PM
Dr. Ornish was not on, but he was mentioned.

JerseyGyrl
07-17-2008, 02:08 PM
Anyone catch the Today show this morning? They said that this study had quite a few flaws, including the fact that it was funded by the Atkins Foundation and that the lower fat diet didn't lower the fat much at all.

The study was FUNDED by the Atkins Foundation...however, the actual study itself was not even based on the Atkins diet...it was based on a similar diet (although, if it didn't include meat & it did include vegetarian sources of fat & protein...this is not similar to Atkins!)

The study, published today in the New England Journal of Medicine stated the study was highly credible.
http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/full/359/3/229?query=TOC

And as far as the lower fat diet not lowering fat all that much...that just goes to show you, fat doesn't have to be lowered to cause a person to lose weight:)

SlowMovingWoman
07-17-2008, 03:05 PM
I posted this on another site but thought I'd post it here also
----------------------------------------------------------------
I went to the site and read the report on the three diets. I then sent a comments
to the site asking them to clarify what they meant by eating a vegetarian low
carb diet. The report stated that the first two months of the diet was no more
than twenty carbs a day. I asked how you could stay at twenty carbs eating
vegetarian. I just don't see how that could be done. Now if they had said to eat
the lowest fat meats and cheese and remove all visable fat, I could have understood
that. I asked them to release more info on the details of the diet to the media and
perhaps a two or three day menu. I hope they do explain what they mean.

mimzy
07-17-2008, 03:24 PM
I thought the amount of weight they lost on all the plans was low, and it does seem that on the actual Atkins diet people generally lose a whole lot more but I'm confused how that actually works, can anyone tell me if at any point on Atkins you do count calories? Because regardless of whether the body is in fat burning mode or carb burning mode I don't understand why the body would begin to burn its own stored fat as fuel if its getting adequate fuel on a daily basis from the food being eaten? :shrug:

Sorry if this is a totally dumb question, I know I should read the book but I have lost it and not yet replaced it so bear with me :^:

kaplods
07-17-2008, 03:52 PM
Funding sources aren't necessarily as big a concern as they seem to be. Reputable university/hospital research programs apply for grants to get the money they need for funding, however, they're very careful to do what they can to prevent even the rumor of the funding affecting the outcome of the study. Often the people doing the actual research do not know where the money is coming from. So, just that the study is funded by Atkins would not concern me nearly as much as the reputation of the facility doing the research.

Considering how much vegetables I can eat that barely contribute carbs at all to my diet, I don't think it would be terribly difficult to keep carbs under 20 g without eating meat (especially if you're not "counting" fish as meat - which is still a very common, if incorrect reasoning). Even without fish, there are vegetarian sources of protein that are quite low in carb.

I'm not an expert, as I'm still an omnivore, but I eat a lot less meat than I used to (partially because various concerns with large-scale "factory" meat production, but honestly, mostly because of finances). At any rate, I use quite a few vegetarian low carb products. Tvp (soy protein, in several forms) is quite low carb, and for 60 - 100 calories (depending whether the tvp is flavored, etc) it's the equivalent of 3 to 4 ounces of beef. I'm not vegetarian, but I like that per serving, it's 1/2 the calories of beef (or less) and 1/3 the price. So any time a recipe calls for ground beef, I either use tvp or use my own mixture of tvp and ground meat (I used to use 1 lb of ground beef to 1 cup of dry tvp - this is about a 50/50 split, but now I use more tvp about 1 lb of tvp to 1/2 lb of ground beef and 1/2 lb of ground chicken along with onion, celery, bell pepper and garlic. I then freeze it and smush the bag every few minutes until it's frozen, so I can scoop out what I need to make quick recipes with).

I'm not following Atkins, but I know the plan pretty well. I'm not limiting my carbs to 20g. I aim for under 100g and feel ok about a day that is under 150g. I've had days as low as 40, but if I consistently eat fewer than 60g, I lose weight much more quickly, but experience headaches, light headedness, and severe irritability. So a moderate approach works much better for me, but what I'm doing isn't incompatible with Atkins, I just didn't do induction and take 16 or more weeks to get here (because after you're done with induction you can add 5g of carbs per week so long as you're still comfortable with the rate you're losing). It's interesting to note that a person following Atkins in OWL (ongoing weight loss) should be eating more than 20 g of carbs, but Atkins never says how many carbs it should be. The person can keep adding carbs, basically until they stop losing weight, and then back up to the carb level that allows them to continue to lose weight. Atkins never tells the person where to stop, so a person could theoretically be eating what I do, that is 100 or more carbs per day and could still be following Atkins as it is laid out in the books. Also while Atkins tells you the foods you are allowed to eat, it does not tell you what you HAVE to eat, so a person on Atkins does not have to ever have cheese, beef, pork, or bacon if they do not want to. There are plenty of other things they can eat.

A completely vegan diet, I would guess would be extremely challenging (at least for me, for someone already a vegan, it might be a breeze, I don't know). Still, I'd hardly declare it impossible, just from knowing what I do about what I eat. I bet that I could keep my carb count very low and eat vegetarian if not vegan. It would just take a LOT more work.

kaplods
07-17-2008, 04:04 PM
Quoting mimzy: I thought the amount of weight they lost on all the plans was low, and it does seem that on the actual Atkins diet people generally lose a whole lot more but I'm confused how that actually works, can anyone tell me if at any point on Atkins you do count calories? Because regardless of whether the body is in fat burning mode or carb burning mode I don't understand why the body would begin to burn its own stored fat as fuel if its getting adequate fuel on a daily basis from the food being eaten?
__________________________________________________ ________

mimzy,

I think I can help a bit. The amounts lost in these studies are always very low, because overall, diet compliance is very low. Getting people to go on a diet is easy, getting them to stay on one, is difficult (even when you call it a lifestyle change). People revert to old behaviors very easily, so in any group, only a few are going to be successful. While the average may have been 5 lbs, the real fact is that some people lost nothing, some gained, and some lost a lot.

On Atkins, you're never supposed to have to count calories. The idea is that when you're eating according to plan, hunger will regulate your food needs, and you won't have to count calories.

I'm not sure this is true for everyone. I think for people with compulsive eating issues, or (like me) have wonky hunger signals that counting carbs sometimes isn't enough. Although Atkins is clear that you're not to eat as much steak (for example) as you are able to stuff into your stomach without upchucking. You're only supposed to eat until you are just satisfied (what most of us think of as "full" is probably too much).

Since my hunger control system doesn't work right (if I'm eating too many carbs, I'm always hungry, and if I'm eating very low carb, I don't even get hungry and I certainly don't know what satisfied but not "full" is), I use a back up plan of an exchange plan. Though I do know many low carbers who have lost and maintained without counting a single calorie - or even carb, they just followed some basic guidelines in avoiding foods with significant starch/sugar content.

betsysunqueen
07-17-2008, 06:43 PM
Sorry didn't mean to come across as if it was directed at you, it was more just a general statement after listening to the news report and hearing the female reporter Ann Curry say, "We're not talking talking about the Atkins diet that involves bacon, cheese and steak. so what exactly are we talking about?"

I just seem to be having one of those days where every post I write comes out wrong and offends someone. Sorry if it did.

I see. Yeah, I can see where Ann Curry's statements would have set you on edge! :)

Timlin
07-17-2008, 11:17 PM
I agree that it's not a good study really. I can't imagine Atkins without eggs?? It's annoying that they can't just do an honest study and let us know if the eggs will become an issue. I was so disappointed when I read the article.....10 lbs in 2 years is just depressing. Why would you go without and make such huge changes in your diet if you would only lose from 6.5 to 10 lbs in 2 years?

On Atkins I've lost 26 lbs in 4 months......and I'm sure if I just stay to his instructions I'll lose the other 22 I need to remove before the year is up. (wishful thinking? I hope not!)

mamaspank
07-17-2008, 11:59 PM
JerseyGrl,

In all honesty, I have tried Atkins and I have done the low-fat thing. The low-fat thing is what works for me. I was never able to lose more than seven or eight pounds with Atkins. I was very loyal to the diet, but I felt like I was missing out on a lot of food. I thought that it was interesting that when they brought up the topic on the Today show that the doctor made it a point to say who the study was funded by. Usually they just mention it and move on. Just thought I would counter one doctor's viewpoint with another.

I think it is great that you have found success with Atkins. I have a couple friends that love they way they feel on it.

mimzy
07-18-2008, 04:37 AM
kaplods,

Thank you for explaining that, I can see how that would work. When I think about it, because I was always hungry when I was eating starchy carbs I was eating at least three times what I actually needed, whereas on Atkins there's no way I'd be hungry enough to eat too much. So I guess there is a calorie deficit but the difference is you don't have to worry about counting the calories because you will naturally end up eating the amount that's right. I get it now!

JerseyGyrl
07-18-2008, 09:24 AM
can anyone tell me if at any point on Atkins you do count calories?

You may find this information helpful regarding low carb & calorie counting:)
http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/w...nd-calories-2/

JerseyGyrl
07-18-2008, 10:17 AM
It's annoying that they can't just do an honest study

They are making it a point to mention (over & over & over!) that the Atkins Foundation FUNDED the study...which automatically leads people to assume the supposed low carb diet they studied was Atkins. You know what they say about assuming;) Then of course, there are the totally clueless people out there like Ann Curry with her bacon, cheese & steak comment. This is her personal opinion of Atkins...which is incorrect. It does however account for the way most people perceive Atkins. The majority of people (unless they've taken the time to actually sit & read the book) believe we on Atkins sit & eat bacon, cheese, steak, butter etc. and never touch a veggie or a salad. What most people fail to realize is, Atkins (done PROPERLY) is an adequate protein, high fat eating plan. That being said, if this study compared a "low-carb" diet that did not include meat or included very little of it & relied on "vegetarian sources of fat & protein"....I'm sorry to tell ya folks but, this is NOT Atkins! And, most likely, this is the reason for the low weight loss in a 2 year period.

I listened to Dr. Timothy Johnson on the news and noticed he was quick to push people cut down on saturated and trans fats, refined carbs, cut down on calories and exercise. What I found quite interesting was...he never mentioned the effect low carb had on cholesterol. The medical profession has preached low fat for many years and when something comes along that totally contradicts what they've conditioned people to believe...its not an easy pill for them to swallow.

At best, the study was a very poor representation of low carb. I've been doing Atkins for over 4 years now...in the first 4½ months, I lost 50 lbs. If I had only lost 10 lbs in 2 years...I'd have thrown my hands in the air and said "low carb doesn't work!!" but...I'm living proof, it DOES!

Suzanne 3FC
07-18-2008, 12:07 PM
The only other big published study that put Atkins (slightly) ahead of a few other diets also resulted in the same low weight loss. Participants lost an average of 6 pounds in the course of one year (almost the same as the other diets studied). And it was a PURE Atkins program that followed the menus in the book, and that didn't encourage plant based protein and fats.

Whether the protein was animal or plant, the diet in this study was "Atkins-like" in that it followed the low carb counts of induction and OWL. I thought it was interesting that the Med group included many more carbs and a wide variety of vegetables and they lost the same amount of weight as the carb controlled group.

JerseyGyrl
07-18-2008, 12:42 PM
The only other big published study that put Atkins (slightly) ahead of a few other diets also resulted in the same low weight loss. Participants lost an average of 6 pounds in the course of one year (almost the same as the other diets studied). And it was a PURE Atkins program that followed the menus in the book, and that didn't encourage plant based protein and fats.


The menu's in the book...oh good Lord...wonder which book those menu's were from:?::?::?: If its any of the newer versions, they encourage "Atkins products" & other unappropriate Induction foods. But anywho...I am thinking I'd like to be a part of one of those so-called "studies";)

kaplods
07-18-2008, 01:08 PM
I have to admit that I'm rather tired of studies that compare diet to diet and say "here this one was better." I think we've come to the point that we know that, like people, all diets are not created equally. Intuitively, some are going to be better for CERTAIN individuals than others, and there's not a lot of research into finding out the variables that make one plan better for a certain individual than others. And maybe because they haven't found ANY that seems to work very well, they're not looking for more complicated research, but I think that's one of the reasons that THEY aren't finding any of particular success. I think a weight loss program has to be tailor-made to the individual, and for many people may have to include components like nutrition counseling, social support, maybe even "family intervention," and ways to offer or encourage physical therapy/exercise.

I mean there's some "anectdotal" recommendations. Some fibromylagia resources suggest that "the Zone" diet of 60/40/40 :(carbs/fat/protein) helps control symptom. This hasn't been thoroughly researched, just clusters of fibromites saying it has worked for them. Ironically the Zone is considered a low carb plan by many, and is included in Elizabeth Ward's book, The Low-Carb Bible (good book, by the way).

Insulin Resistant folks may do better on low-carb (a little research, but not much, according to my doctor).

Ornish (very low fat, mostly vegetarian) is supposedly very good for heart disease patients, but very difficult to stick to (with a drop out rate up to 95%). What good is a plan that works, but no one will follow, well if we'd get rid of the idea that only perfection "counts" maybe a lot more.

I think most of us who have battled our weight for 5 years or more, could design a better study than half these geniuses doing the research.

I'm being bitter. I know it's hard to design a good weight loss study, because most people will drop out or be unable or unwilling to comply to the diet as directed. Unless you put eveyone in a locked-down hospital, and searched visitors and staff before they had contact with the patient/participants, compliance is going to be a problem (and I would bet that "smuggling in" off-plan foods would still be a problem). It's the way people are built.

Suzanne 3FC
07-18-2008, 01:35 PM
Ornish's plan was originally just for heart patients, because once you reach that point drastic measures are necessary. A lot of research and published clinical studies proved it really did help heart patients. Then there was the less restrictive version that was more for heart disease prevention, and again this plan was really designed for people with concerns about heart health. Weight loss was a fringe benefit, although weight loss in itself was crucial to heart disease prevention and treatment. As far as I know, it was never intended for the average overweight person who simply wanted to drop some weight. You pick your goal and choose your diet accordingly, so the Ornish plan may very well be best for some people, but most average dieters are not going to consider it. However, it is considered an extreme low fat diet just as Atkins is considered an extreme low carb diet. So the media grabs it and holds on for attention sucking headlines, and therefore sends mixed messages. I think that's the case in this situation as well. "Atkins" better than the Mediterranean diet? That's sure good for headlines. Then when you pick apart the study, you have to scratch your chin because that's not exactly what the study showed.

Edited to add: I just found out that this study found that women on the Atkins plan lost an average of just 4 pounds over the 2 year period, while women on the Med diet lost 14. Another study done on a vegan high nutrient density diet lost an average of 53 pounds over 2 years.

JerseyGyrl
07-18-2008, 02:26 PM
I think we can all agree no 1 diet works for everyone, you have to find what works for you & stick with it. Atkins works for me!:)

I believe the impressive part of this study were the cholesterol results:)

"More surprising were the measures of cholesterol. Critics have long acknowledged that an Atkins-style diet could help people lose weight but feared that over the long term, it may drive up cholesterol because it allows more fat.
But the low-carb approach seemed to trigger the most improvement in several cholesterol measures, including the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL, the "good" cholesterol. For example, someone with total cholesterol of 200 and an HDL of 50 would have a ratio of 4 to 1. The optimum ratio is 3.5 to 1, according to the American Heart Association.
Doctors see that ratio as a sign of a patient's risk for hardening of the arteries. "You want that low," Stampfer said.
The ratio declined by 20 percent in people on the low-carb diet, compared to 16 percent in those on the Mediterranean and 12 percent in low-fat dieters."

A 20% decline in ratio on low-carb as compared to 12% on low-fat...this is quite impressive:woohoo:

Someday, the skeptics will realize that it isn't fat that is bad for you..its the combination of fat & refined carbs.

KLK
07-18-2008, 02:39 PM
I don't do Atkins (though I have read the book) but I do limit my carb in-take and I have seen great results with this kind of eating so far; my binging is controlled, I've lost inches and a dress size, I have lots of energy, I'm building muscle like whoa, etc. I've also grown extremely skeptical about the benefits of a low-fat diet. A few of the books I've read on the subject have actually traced connection between the push for low-fat diets and beginning of the obesity epidemic in the US, since low-fat almost always means high-carb. I'm at work now, but I can quote the source later at home, if I have a moment.

Though, as Kaplods said, no one diet strategy is right for everyone; everyone has a unique biochemical and genetic make-up that, well, make them and their circumstances special and I have no doubt that people can and do lose lots of weight (and keep it off) on high/"normal" carb and low fat diets. But for me... eating too many carbs leads to binging, which leads to weight gain and depression and the like. Eating high protein/(healthy) fat foods keeps me satisfied and helps me shed the pounds.

And again to agree with Kaplods -- I think we could run a weight loss study better than the "researchers" too.

I think we can all agree no 1 diet works for everyone, you have to find what works for you & stick with it. Atkins works for me!:)

I believe the impressive part of this study were the cholesterol results:)

"More surprising were the measures of cholesterol. Critics have long acknowledged that an Atkins-style diet could help people lose weight but feared that over the long term, it may drive up cholesterol because it allows more fat.
But the low-carb approach seemed to trigger the most improvement in several cholesterol measures, including the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL, the "good" cholesterol. For example, someone with total cholesterol of 200 and an HDL of 50 would have a ratio of 4 to 1. The optimum ratio is 3.5 to 1, according to the American Heart Association.
Doctors see that ratio as a sign of a patient's risk for hardening of the arteries. "You want that low," Stampfer said.
The ratio declined by 20 percent in people on the low-carb diet, compared to 16 percent in those on the Mediterranean and 12 percent in low-fat dieters."

A 20% decline in ratio on low-carb as compared to 12% on low-fat...this is quite impressive:woohoo:

Someday, the skeptics will realize that it isn't fat that is bad for you..its the combination of fat & refined carbs.

Suzanne 3FC
07-18-2008, 07:01 PM
I believe the impressive part of this study were the cholesterol results:)


If they truly did eat a diet of vegetable based proteins and fats then this would be expected. Would it have been the same otherwise? We don't really know. But I know people that followed the animal protein/fat version of Atkins that did eventually report increased cholesterol. While an initial drop in cholesterol is expected with any weight loss diet (since it's due to the weight loss and not the diet) after a while the source of fat in our diet does seem to matter.

A few years ago, we did a survey on site to see what diets everyone was following and if they were happy with them, and if not then why. Over 4,000 people responded. Most of the people that followed Atkins or other low carb diets reported quitting because they either found it too restrictive to stick to, or they lost some weight but felt it was unhealthy (based on blood work results, etc). Of those that quit Atkins (or other low carb) many moved on to South Beach and were more successful and satisfied with the options and effect on their health. Still, South Beach came in second in the survey. The most popular diet plan was Weight Watchers, due to flexibility, easy to stick to for the duration, and effectiveness.

JerseyGyrl
07-18-2008, 07:18 PM
Most of the people that followed Atkins or other low carb diets reported quitting because they either found it too restrictive to stick to

I'm always amazed at the number of people that quit Atkins and come back...usually saying "this is the only plan that worked for me". I've seen so much of that on this board as well as several others I belong to.