Weight Loss Support - Starting from square one again. Any Advice? What has worked for you?




wannabe little
07-13-2008, 11:59 AM
Hi I'm Di.
I need to re-think my whole weight loss stratagy because time and time again I have failed miserablly. I want to find a solution and stick with it. In the past I've been pretty undiciplined. I have tried WW, Jenny, Atkins and South Beach. Usually I lose a fair bit of weight and get bored and gain back more than I lost. I'm always tired. I know excercise will help. I really want to LOVE excercise but it's so hard to get moving.
So, I guess my question is. How is everyone effectivly losing weight? I'm in my planing stage and I want to come up with a clear stratigy by the end of the week. Previously, I've never had a plan. Just implusively joined what ever program I've come across. It's been expensive and unsuccessful and I'm so tired of being a yo-yo :dizzy:LOL

Any thought? I could really use lots of insight.
Thanks


suitejudyblueeyes
07-13-2008, 12:09 PM
Take a minute to think about what made you unsuccessful in the past. You've tried different programs and always gotten bored with them, which leads you to go off plan and gain back the weight. So what is it that you find boring? Is it the structure of having only certain things to eat? The pickiness of having to count calories or points? If there is something concrete like that which you have learned you do not like, it should be simple enough to find a plan that doesn't hit that trigger for you.

Personally I am on Weight Watchers, and would never think of doing anything else. Counting points is more manageable for me than counting calories, and the flexibility of the plan is what keeps me here. WW also has a sister program to Flex called Core, which doesn't require you to count anything but has a more restricted world of food which you can choose from.

It's highly individual though, and I think before anyone can share anything with you beyond info on what has worked for them, we'd need more information about you - about what YOU think it takes for a WL program to be sustainable, about what YOU are looking to get out of it, about what kinds of foods YOU like to eat. Some people prefer having a list of foods to work with but not count anything; some people do well cutting out groups of foods; some do well just counting calories. It's highly individual.

As for exercise, it's the same - experiment with different things until you find something you truly love, something which doesn't feel like exercise at the end of the day because it's so enjoyable. Or, if you can't do this, suck it up and move anyway :) In order for this journey to be a success, you have to be committed to sticking through it even when things get boring, even when you really don't want to but know you should.

AJ113
07-13-2008, 06:18 PM
Instead of dieting, try changing your diet by means of multiple small changes, such as swapping full fat milk for skimmed, sugar substitute for sugar, low calorie versions of your regular foods, low fat spread instead of butter. I'm sure you can think of plenty more. The key to these changes are that they are manageable, they are not drastic and therefore you are more likely to stick with them. It's kinda stealth dieting, if you know what I mean.

This worked for me, but don't forget the exercise too!


tigerlady48
07-13-2008, 06:34 PM
First of all I would have to say the first few letters in dieting are the reason you shouldn't. You have to think of it as a lifestyle change. This is truely what you are doing. If you don't change it permenantly you will always go back to your old ways.

I agree with AJ113 you need to take baby steps. Try switching to healthy foods little by little. Starting putting some ground turkey or chicken in with your ground beef 1/4. The next week 1/2 and 1/2 it...then 3/4 and in a month you can eat ground chicken or turkey instead of ground beef. You have just trained your taste buds. This can work with just about any food.

As far as the exercise goes. The best thing to get you started is just to walk. Invest in a walkman or Ipod and get some music that you love to move to and get going. Before you know it you will have walked farther than you think. Also, invest in a pedometer, this will help you track how far you are going when you need to push just that little bit extra. Both of these items can be used no matter what "lifestyle" plan you choose.

Drink lots and lots and lots of water. This is key no matter what you decide.

Lastly, if the pounds are bothering you, take several measurements of yourself (upper arms, thighs, bust, don't forget neck and ankles!) This will really help, most of the time the weight loss is slower than the inches so when you weigh in and get discouraged by the number you will be jumping for joy with the inches lost...and that is what will get you into smaller sizes and keep you motivated! Hope it helps and this is for you!!!

:dust: :dust: :dust:

AJ113
07-13-2008, 06:53 PM
I agree with tigerlady that walking is the best exercise, certainly at first if not permanently. It's easy,cheap. low impact, and you can do it almost anywhere.

CountingDown
07-13-2008, 06:53 PM
Another vote for lifestyle changes here. I count calories because I needed help with portion control and accountability for what I ate. I also needed to keep a food diary (Fitday) because I needed to hold myself accountable for every BLT.

The posters above had some good advice. Analyze why you get bored, and look for a plan that you can do forever.

Keep trying. I have found that this is a journey, one where we will make wrong turns occasionally, but that if we keep at it, we WILL get there :D

chick_in_the_hat
07-13-2008, 07:20 PM
Counting calories and walking worked for me. I've since added weight training and an addiction to bicycling. :D

srmb60
07-14-2008, 05:33 AM
WRT changing lifestyle ... find all the posts you can by Glory87. Fabulous work and she explains it well.

I count calories and can't imagine doing anything else.

wannabe little
07-14-2008, 08:11 AM
Thanks everyone for the great advice and suggestions.
I walk a lot but you can't walk very fast with a 4 and 7 year old with you.
I've been thinking calorie counting will work best for me but my biggest problem is the night time bindge eating in front of the TV with hubby.
This may be an odd question but how many calories should one eat to start seeing the pounds come off. I remember when I started Jenny Craig they gave me what I thought was a rediculiously high amount of calories. I'm just wondering if there's a formula or something.

Heather
07-14-2008, 08:38 AM
wannabe --

I'm a calorie counter too, for many of the reasons mentioned above. If you want to get a sense of the number of calories to eat, check out the calorie counting forum here: http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=172

Read the sticky on frequently asked questions at the top of that page to get you started. It's here: http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/showthread.php?t=120806

And nighttime eating gets many of us. Here's a recent thread on that topic from here in Weight Loss Support! http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/showthread.php?t=146156

wannabe little
07-14-2008, 08:41 AM
Great
Thanks Heather!

TamTam
07-14-2008, 08:50 AM
Have you thought of the No S diet? Try the website by the same name. It's helped me to not graze all day, it's helped me get my snacking under control, I still have to work improving my weekend eating, but it has brought sanity back to my eating. God Bless.

the slim me
07-14-2008, 08:59 AM
Another calorie counter here. I lost, and have kept the weight off for 7 months now. I simply changed my diet. I eat healthy. I eat smaller portions. I plan, plan, plan....did I say plan???? I keep a journal of what I eat. everything. I was amazed at how many calories i ate a day! It keeps me going. I make a menu for a week, including snacks. That helps a lot too.

exercise is great to help you lose and tone up. My exercise of choice is walking too. Kids can't keep up or walk fast enough? go to a tract and let them play in the middle while you walk. But walking will be good for them too.

Good luck, you can do this, ya know!!!

shrinkin
07-14-2008, 09:08 AM
For me, the success lies in how I think about eating choices, planning, and exercise. I am using the Beck Diet solution to change my long term thinking of eating. It is a daily short course in "how to" end sabotaging thinking, like "this can't work." or "Its too hard to lose weight." It works with any diet. There are probably other psychological programs out there too, so I would recommend you investigate and consider whether it would help you stay in for the long term. Good luck!

TJFitnessDiva
07-14-2008, 09:57 AM
I'm a WW too and have found success this time....I think it's more of your attitude and determination that will help you stick with any plan. Positive thinking is also essential.

Try adding as much variety as you can so you will not get bored. Make your meals more colorful. I know I got bored when I was just eating the everyday things before I started WW....so that can happen no matter what.

For night time snacking, if I feel the urge then I pop a piece of sugar free gum in my mouth. Once in a while that doesn't work and then I get something healthy like broccoli or carrots.

Plus you gotta move! Exercise in anyway you can!!! With my kids (I have a 2yo, 4yo and a 7 yo) we go swimming a lot, bike riding (I have a trailer that I pull the younger 2 in), walking, etc. Even just getting down on the floor and playing with them can give you some sort of exercise ;)

foundtreasure
07-15-2008, 01:07 PM
Hi I'm Di.
I need to re-think my whole weight loss stratagy because time and time again I have failed miserablly. I want to find a solution and stick with it. In the past I've been pretty undiciplined. I have tried WW, Jenny, Atkins and South Beach. Usually I lose a fair bit of weight and get bored and gain back more than I lost. I'm always tired. I know excercise will help. I really want to LOVE excercise but it's so hard to get moving.
So, I guess my question is. How is everyone effectivly losing weight? I'm in my planing stage and I want to come up with a clear stratigy by the end of the week. Previously, I've never had a plan. Just implusively joined what ever program I've come across. It's been expensive and unsuccessful and I'm so tired of being a yo-yo :dizzy:LOL

Any thought? I could really use lots of insight.
Thanks


My brother is a pastor and he has lost weight in just a few weeks with a product that was introduced to him which is very healthy (doctors are even endorcing it.) My brother said that it gave him energy on top of making his appetite decrease to where he only ate half as much as he used to. He said he just took 3 pills of this herbal weight-loss product every morning and weight starting coming off. The only major changes in his diet were replacing sodas with water and walking about 30 minutes every day. He looks good. He said people keep coming up to him, telling him how great he looks and then ask how he lost his weight. So, many of the members of his congregation are currently taking these weight-loss pills and they are having the same results. Pretty soon he'll probably have the healthiest congregation in the state! :)
This is my first time on this blog site so I'm not sure if I can even share the name of this product or the company who makes it. I don't want to break any rules my first time here. But I know this is a fairly new company and people are sold on this product because of the results they're getting.

KLK
07-15-2008, 01:44 PM
I agree with others -- don't look to diet; look to revamp your whole way of eating and looking at food and exercise. Strangely, although I was way overweight for much of my life, I NEVER dieted before I lost weigtht in 2004. I was SO heavy, and I should have been thinking ab losing weight since childhood, but i NEVER dieted. Although I haven't lost all the weight I really want to (yet) I have maintained my weightloss (80lbs-ish) for over 3 years and what has helped me to do that is to not think of what I am doing as an attempt to lose weight and to diet -- it's an attempt to change my lifestyle, to become fit and to eat healthily.

More recently, I've realized how much an effect carbs have on my body, my appetite and my potential to binge, so keeping watch on how many carbs I eat is important (even healthy whole wheat carbs). But I don't think of it as doing a low-carb diet, but more like "My body is sensitive to this and it always will be; from now on, I'd better stear clear of breads and rice and such as much as possible." That doesn't mean I will never have bread again, but just that I need to keep the carbs in check -- it's a permanent state.

Also, I just recently finally 'got' how important weight training really is to the whole weight loss thing.

kaplods
07-15-2008, 02:39 PM
I've tried nearly every hair-brained scheme, as well as most sensible plans, with varying levels of short-term success.

Everyone IS different, so you have to learn to really know yourself, and why you haven't gotten to where yo want to be, and what it will take to get there.

My first suggestion is to take failure out of your vocabulary. You are not starting at square one - you've successfully learned what doesn't work. You have never and will never "start over" because every experience you have had, teaches you something.

Weight loss and maintenance is a skill, a difficult skill. And just like picking up a violin, it's not likely that you'll be good at it except after lots of practice.

It doesn't help that a lot of the advice we get about weight loss is totally wrong.

I really think that its important to build on success. Especially when you're feeling helpless and lethargic. Start small and build on success.

My first recommendation though is to get a really good check up, including tests for blood sugar (ideally a glucose tolerance test also) and a thyroid panel. If you have thyroid or metabolic issues, they could be accounting for the fatigue and some of the weight loss issues. It won't change the fact that you're in charge of your weight loss, but knowing the enemy does help you fight it. Medication or specific diets may be able help.

For me, changing my birth control (to something like seasonique where you only have a few periods a year - actually I just start a new pack of low dose bc on week four rather than using the placebo pills - definitely talk to your doctor before doing this if you think PMS is a large contributor to your weight issues) and finding low carb eating has been a godsend for me. It's making the impossible, doable (difficult, but doable).

Finding something to make weight loss physically easier was a large componenet for me. But, I believe a mental change has kept me motivated to continue. I've had to throw away most of what I learned about what weight loss is SUPPOSED to look and feel like. I don't have to be perfect, I just have to be better. Eating off plan, isn't "being bad," it's making a choice that is not in the best interest of my long term goal. Since I never fail, if I eat something that isn't in the best interest of my long term goal - I do not feel there would be any benefit to make more choices that aren't in the interest of my long term goal. A piece of cake is not going to send me into a binge because "what's the use, I've already failed, I might as well eat whatever I want and just start over tomorrow or maybe next monday," or whatever....

Every choice matters. I put posters up all over my house (except in the bathroom) that say "Make every choice count." I don't always listen to that advice, but such a little dorky thing has helped.

I can't do this "fast" anymore. I have insulin resistance, which basically means my metabolism is in the toilet. I'm on disability and have pain and mobility issues, so I've had to redefine exercise (it is ANY movement, so you do what you can, when you can, as much as you can - look for fun things so that you look forward to doing them).

For me, for example, I volunteer at the humane society to walk dogs (I learned that I have to be careful which dogs I walk, because if I pick a dog that walks me, I could be in bed for a couple of days).

For me, joining a support group is key. I joined TOPS because it is very affordable, for more information about TOPS, check out the check tops out thread http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/showthread.php?t=146121

Weighing in weekly, and the group support are key to my success

For me, the key to success is not defining success by the scale. I have no DIRECT control over the scale, but I have control over my actions and what goes into my mouth. I do weigh myself daily, because it helps me. If it made me feel like a failure, I would weigh less often, but for me it helps me see that fluctuations are normal. That I can do everything right and the scale still may not move, but there are other measures of success. I am getting stronger and healthier a lot faster than the weight is coming off.

I use exercise and weight loss sticker charts to keep me motivated. It's dorky, but it's fun. I set goals and even plan little and not so little rewards. When I got under 350 lbs, I bought an MP3 player to use on the treadmill.

I do best when I use my food journal - not only what I eat, but how I feel and what's going on inside my head.

I've told you alot about what is working for me. And in a sense, none of that matters to you at all. You need to learn and find what works for you. Be patient with yourself as you become your own scientist and lab rat. I truly believe that not giving up and not beating yourself up are two of the biggest keys. And by not beating yourself up, I mean that both emotionally and physically. No more crash diets, and no more telling yourself that you are bad (if you've never done either of these then you're already at the head of the class).

That's important too - realizing that you're not the dunce in the class. Most of us (even the smallest) think that there's something wrong with us if we don't lose the 1-2 pounds that is "normal". Well, the problem with that logic, is that 1 - 2 pounds is far from normal or average. Very few people lose even that much consistently. So, if you're going along at your 1/2 to 1 lb a week, even if you weigh 400 lbs, you're actually far ahead of what "most" people who want to lose weight are doing - because "most" of them are giving up after a few weeks of not losing as fast as they would like to.

I know, I've written a novel again. But if one word has helped I'm happy with it, and hope I haven't bored you to tears.

wannabe little
07-15-2008, 07:46 PM
Thank you all I really appreciate all the great insight.
Like many of you said, I really need to focus on making it a lifestyle change rather than a diet that would seem like there's no end in sight. I'm going to stick to calorie counting. I got a brand new notebook last night and started today. Day one was pretty easy. LOL. I know even though I joke about wanting to be a wafe that my only real goal is to be fit and healthy. I am petite and my doctor told me my ideal weight is 115 pounds. I would be happy and comfortable at 140. Still 140 seems so far away. Well, here I go. One day at a time.

Kaplods you definately didn't bore me to tears. You gave me tons of great info and suggestions I hadn't thought about. Thanks

lynnm39
07-17-2008, 01:43 PM
Have you thought of the No S diet? Try the website by the same name. It's helped me to not graze all day, it's helped me get my snacking under control, I still have to work improving my weekend eating, but it has brought sanity back to my eating. God Bless.

You beat me to the punch, CatholicCajun! I was just going to suggest No-S. I'm on a stringent calorie rotation diet right now because I need the motivation of losing an initial chunk of weight, but I will be using No-S for maintenance.

Wannabe Little, you've gotten some wonderful advice here. I, too, have lost and regained weight at least three times in my life. This time around, I am focused as much on maintenance as I am on losing. I am re-evaluating my past dieting & exercising behavior and coming up with strategies that will help me not regain the weight. I think that one of the reasons so many people regain weight is that they do not focus on maintenance (this was the case with me, anyway).

cmichele1974
07-17-2008, 02:30 PM
I've used, considered, and researched many other ways of losing weight. The one that always work and is doable for my lifestyle is lower calories, complex carbs, low-fat, and exercising. This way is easier for me because I don't care to eat a lot of meat or massive amounts of protein. I also don't have a problem with sweets and as a woman, I can tell you that I hate chocolate, lol!

Whole grains, lots of veggies, a moderate amount of fruit, olive oil, dairy, and lean fish, poultry, and seafood is all I need.

yoyonomoreinvegas
07-17-2008, 03:45 PM
...I think it's more of your attitude and determination that will help you stick with any plan. Positive thinking is also essential.

Absolutely!! I can't tell you how much time I wasted saying "this won't work for me because (fill in any old excuse here - I used them all :lol: )" so, of course, it didn't. Once I changed my outlook to "I'm going to do _______, and if it doesn't do the trick I'll tinker until find what will" I was amazed (and a little astonished) at the results. I commented in another thread the other day that it's almost like a switch in my head got flipped.

That, and the plan, plan, plan thing like the slim me said. I'm not quite as organized as she is, and DH likes the illusion of spontaneity when it comes to his dinners, so I don't do a whole week's worth of menus but I do make sure that the only thing in the house is good, healthy foods so there aren't any risks of slipping, and I do bring my lunch and a couple of OP snacks to work with me so I'm not tempted by the inevetable person coming around taking the "fast food run" requests - or that nasty old vending machine.

Finally, patience. Don't give up and head for the Dairy Queen if you don't see major losses all at once. There is another thread with the "Paper Towel" analogy in it. You should be sure and read it - makes such great sense (I am a ditz who doesn't know how or I would try and post a link ;) ).