General chatter - At 29 I might have to move back home, and I feel awful about it! :(




Smiling_Sara
07-11-2008, 10:40 AM
To save some money, I might move back home. I can't believe it. Can't believe I"m even thinking about it. Here's the thing though, I can't afford a nice place on my own, and even in a small cramped apt, I would have to pinch pennies and not be able to save anything.

By this time in my life, I have always thought I would be in a house with my own family by now, and now, I may be moving back into my childhood home, so I can save money, to hopefully actually move into a house someday.

I'm scared people will judge me when I tell them I moved home. I'm scared it will put my non existing dating life into an even blacker hole. Both my younger siblings are married and own homes. It just makes me feel so blah.

I hope I make the right descion. I just wanted to vent about it for a second. :(


junebug41
07-11-2008, 10:46 AM
It really is VERY common! I know a lot of people that move home at some point in their 20's to get things together. It's ok!!! I'm sure you will back on your feet in no time!

You are not alone. It's just a sign of the times we're living in. :hug:

JayEll
07-11-2008, 10:59 AM
I'd like to see you come up with alternatives for NOT moving back home. Aren't there some things you could do? Apply for a new job? Get a second job? Find a place where you could share costs with roommates?

Although these days a lot of people find themselves facing rough spots, you're at an age where you need to be on your own. I think that moving home would be a mistake for you.

Good luck...
Jay


nelie
07-11-2008, 11:03 AM
I think there is nothing wrong with moving back home temporarily. I moved back home in my early 20s for a short period of time. My husband also moved back home for a short period of time when he was around 30.

I think it can help you plan, focus and help figure out what the best options are for you. I wouldn't think of it as a long term solution and wouldn't do it without an exit plan but it isn't always a bad idea.

My advice is - pay rent to your parents as well to yourself. Make sure you are budgeting and saving money.

MalibuBeachBound
07-11-2008, 11:04 AM
Yeah, it seriously isn't a big deal. I have had friends that at 27 went back to live with their parents for the same reason. For the 2 that this happened to, both had just ok jobs and terrible credit and one had to file for bankruptcy. Basically, they both felt the same way you did, but now a year later, one of them is taking out loans to finish up her degree and another got a better job and moved back out. Sometimes it just takes a little bit of savings and time to go a long way.

You definitely are not alone.

1. I am 28, married, taking out about $180,000 to fund dental school (literally), living 600 miles away from my parents and my brother and I miss them a lot despite having my own place, a husband etc. Everything is a trade off.

2. My brother is 31 and he still lives with my parents (never moved out). He has a great job as an electrical engineer and JUST bought his own place (still not living there). No one judges him because not having expenses has made him probably the richest out of all of his friends ;) I sometimes wish I wouldn't have moved away so soon.

Actually, I get judged more for moving away from everyone :^:

Good luck! If I was in your situation, I wouldn't hesitate to move back... of course I know it is difficult, but you are doing the right thing and it will likely REALLY benefit your future. This is NOT a failure, this is a VERY intelligent move.

About the dating thing... it may be easier if you have your own place... but if people are going to judge you not by the person you are, but by if you live with your parents or not... are they really the kind of person you want to date?

I stick by my motto. I only have a man because I know I don't need one.

colebear
07-11-2008, 11:23 AM
Don't fret! I'm 31 and I'm moving back in with my mom. I lived with her for most of my 20's. After my Dad died, she was lonely and she doesn't make tons of money, so I paid 1/2 of the expenses and our relationship morphed from mother - daughter to more of a roommate situation. Actually our relationship improved when I moved in as an adult. I moved back out a year ago to get a place with my boyfriend because we were living 28 miles apart and really wanted to be closer together. I've loved living with him, but he was recently laid off and the job options in our town in his field are nil. When our lease ends at the end of the month, he's moving to another city (which breaks my heart!) and I'll be going back to Mom's. She's actually looking forward to the income and my cooking since she doesn't cook at all anymore. I'll probably stay there for 6 months or so while I finish my degree and save money. Then if the boyfriend is settled in his new city, I'll uproot my life and join him there.

I totally agree with nelie, pay your folks so you don't feel like a leech and pay yourself too. That will help you on your road to financial stability. And I'm sure your parents will feel better having you stay with them than in some potentially not so nice area that you can afford on your own.

Taurie
07-11-2008, 11:47 AM
That's not a big deal at all. It's a smart move especially considering the economic climate. I don't know why there is such a stigma about adults living with your folks in the US. In Europe it is very common. Quite a few people I know lived with their parents until their late 20's and saved enough money for a good down payment on their own homes. I see rent as wasted money unless you are paying it to your parents.

As long as you're not free loading and taking advantage of your parents and you are actively doing things to make your life better in the future I don't see how anyone could judge you for that.

OnceUponADrive
07-11-2008, 11:54 AM
I'm 28 and my boyfriend of 4 years and I recently moved in with my mom to save money. We were flushing almost $1000 a month down the toilet renting a crappy apartment and I thought to myself, we'll never be able to save any money this way. My mom made the offer, and almost insisted. Yes, it's always a little difficult moving back in with your parents. Sometimes I desperately wish we were back in our apartment, but most of the time I'm grateful that we got the chance and are putting away LOTS of money. We plan to stay for a couple more years to really get a good savings started. It's the best decision I ever made.

And as a side note, I have MANY friends who wasted their money away renting for too long only to jump into a house they can't afford. All of them are REALLY struggling right now financially. It's really a great idea, so don't feel bad about it! You're being responsible.

SunshineCA
07-11-2008, 01:26 PM
Don't feel bad about even thinking about it. If it's something you need to do, just do it. Like others have stated above, this isn't an uncommon thing. I'm sure your parents would rather you move back home than continue to struggle and suffer on your own. Sometimes ya just gotta do whatcha gotta do.

Do what feels right for you. Good luck with your decision.

JayEll
07-11-2008, 01:49 PM
Hm, interesting point--have your parents invited you to move back home?

Jay

marbleflys
07-11-2008, 01:54 PM
these are difficult economic times for a lot of people. prices are soaring and salaries are not. I'm sure your parents would rather you move back temporarily rather than dig yourself into a deep hole of debt trying to make ends meet.

(gulp, holding my breath that my 27 yo dd doesn't get this idea)

Hat Trick
07-11-2008, 02:10 PM
My husband's niece is your age and just moved back home after living on her own for years. She makes very decent money but really wants to buy a house and this is the only way she can save enough to afford one. I don't think anything is wrong w/doing this at all but move back with a plan. Don't just move back 'till whenever'. Have a clear budget and plan for how much you will pay your parents (DO NOT free-load) and what you will save. Set a timeline and start looking for houses as your deadline approaches. If you think of this a a temporary solution to your problem it may help you view moving back home differently.

As a side note, my brother is 50 years old, not married, has his own condo and over the past two years has had health problems and has temporarily moved in w/my folks off and on. Mostly it was for emotional and nutritional support (he literally needed someone to take care of him for a bit).

I don't see 'moving back home' as a step backwards or anything at all. Just don't let 'temporarily' turn into 'forever'. :)

junebug41
07-11-2008, 02:31 PM
I'd like to see you come up with alternatives for NOT moving back home. Aren't there some things you could do? Apply for a new job? Get a second job? Find a place where you could share costs with roommates?

Although these days a lot of people find themselves facing rough spots, you're at an age where you need to be on your own. I think that moving home would be a mistake for you.

Good luck...
Jay

While it is less than desirable, there have been several articles on this phenomenon of grown children having to move back in with their parents for a time, especially post-graduation and especially if you are repaying student loans. Even before the economy tanked, graduates faced a market where their starting salaries simply wouldn't cover living expenses AND student loan payments. My fiance has a $600 a month loan payment and I am looking at about $400. We both funded our own educations, but combined, that's a mortgage payment.

We hear all the time from our "elders" that we *should* have a house and more, but that just isn't possible. If I did not live with my fiance and vice versa, it would be extremely tight and one of us (most likely me) would have ended up back home, at least for a few months in order to get above water.

JayEll
07-11-2008, 03:32 PM
The idea that people "should" have a house is somewhat outdated at the moment... ;)

I paid off my student loan without moving home...

When I was in my 20s, I left grad school to "find myself," and I wanted to move back home. But my mother said no. She said I was an adult and I should have my own place. Ultimately, I think she was right. She wouldn't have tolerated my bringing dates home, for example. And I learned that I had to support myself.

I'm not saying the OP should do one thing or the other--because I don't really know her circumstances. But I do think that moving home seems to be much more an "automatic" option these days, and I'm not sure that's a good thing--for parents or children.

Jay

junebug41
07-11-2008, 03:54 PM
The idea that people "should" have a house is somewhat outdated at the moment... ;)

I paid off my student loan without moving home...

When I was in my 20s, I left grad school to "find myself," and I wanted to move back home. But my mother said no. She said I was an adult and I should have my own place. Ultimately, I think she was right. She wouldn't have tolerated my bringing dates home, for example. And I learned that I had to support myself.

I'm not saying the OP should do one thing or the other--because I don't really know her circumstances. But I do think that moving home seems to be much more an "automatic" option these days, and I'm not sure that's a good thing--for parents or children.

Jay


We've been hearing the house-buying bit for a while, even before the crash, which has been a recent (yet inevitable) development. In hindsight, I'm glad I stayed a renter ;)

I do agree it's more automatic these days, but I also think it's so much easier to become financially overwhelmed. If we had purchased a home in 2005, I can't imagine the trouble we may be in, especially now that my loan payments have been added to the mix. And while I certainly know my fair share of "freeloaders", I also think that in some cases, parents can be served by having a grown child at home for a bit. I know if I had to move back in with my mother (who is disabled), I would certainly be devoting a lot of time to taking care of her. I agree, leaving the nest is a very important part of adulthood, but why destroy yourself financially in your 20's if you can spend a relatively short amount of time learning how to keep above water?

It sounds like you benefited greatly from your mother's decision to not let you move back home. I'm glad it was such a powerful learning experience for you :)

nelie
07-11-2008, 05:41 PM
My parents were the opposite. My mom got very mad when I moved out and she said that children should live with their parents in their 20s or until they got married. Since I really had no plans/thoughts of getting married, I wasn't buying that. She did have some good arguments on finances and how you can be an adult despite living with your family. Although we are of a slightly different culture where you often see multiple generations living in the same household.

I personally don't think it makes you less of an adult to live with your parents. What I think makes you less of an adult is if you live with whoever and don't carry your weight. If you are paying rent, paying for expenses, doing chores, saving money, etc, then how are you more of an adult by living by yourself or someone other than your parents?

I have a relative who lived 'on his own' but was constantly in financial trouble due to his own bad decisions and immaturity. I would consider many people who live at home much more than an adult than him.

JayEll
07-11-2008, 06:17 PM
The assumption is that it's cheaper to live with your parents, isn't it? Because you'll be paying less? Otherwise, why do it? I don't like to sound cynical, but that is the idea...

Most over-55 communities have rules against under-55 children moving in with parents--unless it's a case of disability or illness--to prevent kids from deciding to come home and live with Mom & Dad. Such as, newly divorced people in their 30s with children... Let's go help Grandma... Oh sure... ;) But I digress...

I was actually quite hurt when my Mom said no. It took a few years to realize it was a good thing. I kinda had to pull myself together... :)

Jay

lilybelle
07-11-2008, 06:35 PM
I think it's great that you have a "home" to move back to with your parents. I never had that as an option as my parents were deceased by the time I would have needed some temporary help.

I have always let my kids and step-kids know that our home is open to them if they need us. I'd much rather they move home if things got unbearable for them finacially than to let them sink and then ask for help. My one exception has been my oldest SD that never has paid her bills, wastes all her money and then just expects to have a revolving door at our house. A couple times getting burned by her and we had to finally say "NO". Especially cause each time she moved back "home" she was pregnant again.

My 22yr. old son technically lives at "home". He is currently stationed in Iraq. I don't worry that he won't have a place to live when he gets back. I am saving his money for him so he can put a large downpayment on his own home.

SoulBliss
07-11-2008, 06:56 PM
I think it's great that you have a "home" to move back to with your parents. I never had that as an option as my parents were deceased by the time I would have needed some temporary help.

I relate to never having a home to go back to! Mine weren't deceased, they just weren't there at all. I've been on my own since I was in my middle teens, and so I don't know what its like to have familial support. What a luxury it seems to be to have that as an option!

lilybelle
07-11-2008, 07:01 PM
Soulbliss, I moved out on my own at the age of 17. I never regretted it, but I did live through some very tough financial times (especially while I was in college and again as a newly single mom).

HarpoChicoGroucho
07-11-2008, 07:14 PM
I recently read an article about the increase of adult children still living or moving back home with their parents. It's recently boomed. And these are people in their 30's and 40's as well. I have a few friends who do and my mom has a few friends her age who have their adult kids living with them. I personally couldn't do it, because I LOVE the privacy and everything else that comes along with living alone, but I spend nearly $900 a month on my apartment and related bills (electricity, internet, water). If I lived with them 5 years (and my dad already said any of us can come back home and not pay rent or bills), I could save $54,000!!! That'd be a great down payment on a house, although I would probably take time off work and travel. :)

EZMONEY
07-11-2008, 07:39 PM
With today's economy I think we will be seeing much more of this...

foreclosures....lack of jobs.....

parents growing older, living longer but maybe not being able to totally care for themselves.....I think divorce will rise again with the finacial stress many will be facing....leading adults/kids back home.

I think each case is different of course.....some blew the chance....some got dealt a bad hand....it's a hard knock life!

People need help from time to time.....

My grandma needed help....my mom moved to live with her and help her...then she needed help to help my grandma...my sister and bil went to help them...now 5 years later my grandma and mom have both passed on...my sis and bil are living with their daughter and sil to help them out financially....nobody planned it that way.

It would be great if that help was always 2-sided and healthy!

Good luck to you BORNTOFLY! I hope it all works out for the best for you and your family :hug:

nelie
07-11-2008, 07:43 PM
I think when I moved out, it was the right decision for me. Everyone does have to make the decision for themselves.

Just because it is more expensive to live by yourself than with your family, doesn't mean it makes you more of an adult to spend more money. Actually doesn't seem smart :) Although what amazes me more are people that buy huge houses for just 2 (or 3 or 4) people. Of course I grew up in an 800 sq ft home and my grandparents home that once housed 9 people is only slightly bigger than that.

My first apartment was modest sized in a modest area and it cost over $900/month. I should've looked for a roommate but housing in the area where I worked as expensive. I had a friend who lived in a 2 bedroom apartment with 4 other people and she paid $300/month for just rent. (all girls, 3 twin beds in 1 room, 2 in the other).

Anyway, that was when I moved back in with my parents to try to regroup and figure out what to do with my expenses to make the best of my income.

LisaMarie71
07-12-2008, 11:44 AM
I don't think anyone should feel ashamed for moving back in with his/her parents, particularly if you're pitching in and not just freeloading (I know plenty of people who do the latter, and it drives me insane). I do tend to agree with JayEll, though, that it's far better to try to make it on your own. My mother would take any of her kids in, even though she doesn't have a lot of money and she lives in a very small house, but none of her four kids have ever come back since we were 17 or 18. I'm not saying I never would, but it would certainly be my absolute last resort. I'm just a big believer in being on your own once you're an adult. I think my mother taught us that while still making it known that we were welcome home if we needed to return. Some of this is generational, too, I think. I'm 36, and I find that people my age and older tend not to think of it as an option, while younger people seem to always know they can go back home. Though I think it can work, I think this trend is a little dangerous in terms of building responsibility and character. There are exceptions, certainly, where people can make it work and it's great, but as an overall trend it's a little scary.

nelie
07-12-2008, 12:38 PM
I don't think anyone should feel ashamed for moving back in with his/her parents, particularly if you're pitching in and not just freeloading (I know plenty of people who do the latter, and it drives me insane). I do tend to agree with JayEll, though, that it's far better to try to make it on your own. My mother would take any of her kids in, even though she doesn't have a lot of money and she lives in a very small house, but none of her four kids have ever come back since we were 17 or 18. I'm not saying I never would, but it would certainly be my absolute last resort. I'm just a big believer in being on your own once you're an adult. I think my mother taught us that while still making it known that we were welcome home if we needed to return. Some of this is generational, too, I think. I'm 36, and I find that people my age and older tend not to think of it as an option, while younger people seem to always know they can go back home. Though I think it can work, I think this trend is a little dangerous in terms of building responsibility and character. There are exceptions, certainly, where people can make it work and it's great, but as an overall trend it's a little scary.


It is quite common in other countries and I think in the US, the trend to be 'on your own' is even fairly new. When money/jobs were good and housing was fairly inexpensive, it was fairly easy to move out on your own. I also think consumerism plays a part in now that we acquire so much stuff, that the basics really aren't basics anymore. There is also the trend towards larger housing and going in major debt that plays into the part of rising house costs beyond what is reasonable for most people.

If someone moves in with their parents to be a freeloader, that is quite alarming and I think no matter what the culture, they would agree with that.

I had a friend who lived very simply in an inexpensive apartment by herself and I was amazed that she basically owned nothing more than a couch, a bed, a tv and some clothes. She saved money for herself, but sent a large portion of her income back to her family. She ended up moving and living with one of her close relatives because she moved to an expensive area and couldn't justify the money on rent when a close relative lived near her new job. She was from a different culture though but I was majorly impressed by the fact that she didn't think of her income as her own but her family's.

JulieJ08
07-12-2008, 01:10 PM
I also think consumerism plays a part in now that we acquire so much stuff, that the basics really aren't basics anymore.

Amen to that. So many young (well, really all ages) people today (certainly not all!) buy iPods, cameras, CDs, game systems, alcohol, eat out multiple times every week, etc, and can't even imagine public transportation / bicycles. They live with all those things, and complain about being broke and borrow money.

junebug41
07-12-2008, 01:33 PM
Amen to that. So many young (well, really all ages) people today (certainly not all!) buy iPods, cameras, CDs, game systems, alcohol, eat out multiple times every week, etc, and can't even imagine public transportation / bicycles. They live with all those things, and complain about being broke and borrow money.

I own an iPod, buy a lot of music, and like to eat out and love good wine.

But I take public transportation ;)

HarpoChicoGroucho
07-12-2008, 11:06 PM
Amen to that. So many young (well, really all ages) people today (certainly not all!) buy iPods, cameras, CDs, game systems, alcohol, eat out multiple times every week, etc, and can't even imagine public transportation / bicycles. They live with all those things, and complain about being broke and borrow money.

I have all of those things (and drink and go out) and I have never borrowed money or been broke (and I also save). And I don't make loads of money either. I do okay, but I would say it's about average for my age for my area. I even went through a health crisis earlier this year and didn't lose my car or my apt and didn't have to sell anything after having no income at all for 4 months (I used my savings). But I will say, I wouldn't live the lifestyle I do if I couldn't afford it and was always broke or have to borrow from people. I have a few friends who enjoy similar lifestyles and are also not broke and can afford it. And then I know some people (mostly family members) who live beyond their means and live paycheck to paycheck because they spend any extra money they have on 'luxury' things. So, they are some responsible/financially savvy people out there who can enjoy those things and not be broke all the time. And they're are some who can't.

:)

Michiemish
07-13-2008, 11:49 AM
Don't worry about moving back home, I know alot of people that are doing that. It is better than putting yourself into credit ****. If I could sell my house and get something out of it I would and move back home to stay with my dad and save money. It hard to go back home, because you think that you failed but you haven't. You are trying to do the right thing for you and not being irresponable and let things get the best of you. Just remeber any person that is going to judge you based upon who you live with and not understanding the reasons behind it, is not worth knowing, even when it comes to guys. :hug:

Smiling_Sara
07-15-2008, 08:50 PM
Thanks for all the kind words everyone. I'm still struggling with this. I don't know anyone my age who lives at home. I could prob swing a 500 a month payment INCLUDING all utilites, but I wouldn't be able to save a dime and I wouldn't be able to have anything but the bare min. including cable and internet. If I move home I can save, and hopefully sometime in the near future put a down payment down on a home.

I do plan on paying my parents rent, I've paid rent since I was 19. I wouldn't feel right if I didn't give them something. I just feel bad, bc in almost 30 years, it would of been the first time my parents would of had a house to themselves. I also feel like at my age, I am taking a step back by doing this, but I'm hoping it will help me more in the future. It's just something I have to keep telling myself, bc it's just not something I'm use to.

Gale02
07-16-2008, 04:33 AM
I wouldn't be able to have anything but the bare min. including cable and internet.

Not to beat a dead horse, but since when are these considered necessities?? Cable and internet are NOT bare minimum, they are luxuries. Basic housing, basic transportation, medication, food (that you cook, not that you eat out), water, climate control, enough clothes to keep you in a job... those are bare minimums.

I think if you can buy ipods, music, movies, dinners out, wine, whatever... WITHOUT GOING INTO DEBT FOR IT then great!! DH and I have made the decision that some of those things are important to have and so we make allowances for them. But, we give up other things in order to have them. Things like cable TV and going to the movies. We own a 10-year old and a 12-year old car, paid for and kept well maintained. We live in a 2 bedroom house and make due with our second hand furniture. We don't take yearly vacations or spend thousands on Christmas. We've decided that being debt free (except the mortgage) is more important. And, yes, we even rented a 600 square foot, one bedroom apartment when we got married.

What's wrong with not being independently wealthy in your 20's? We all look at our parents in their 40's and beyond and think THAT's the life we should be living, completely disregarding the fact that they are 20+ years ahead of us in life. I think that learning to be fiscally responsible is a huge deal and if you don't learn it now, while you're in your 20's, you'll still be trying to learn it while you're in your 30's and 40's and 50's and the cycle never ends. Learning to stay out of debt and support yourself is a big deal, IMO, and should be treated as such.

I think I'm in the minority here, so I'm preparing to duck from all of the rotten tomatoes headed my way... ;)

LisaMarie71
07-16-2008, 11:15 AM
Learning to stay out of debt and support yourself is a big deal, IMO, and should be treated as such.

I think I'm in the minority here, so I'm preparing to duck from all of the rotten tomatoes headed my way... ;)

I completely agree with you. I made some mistakes in my 20s, so I do have some debt that I have to deal with now, but I wouldn't trade that because I know that I did it on my own, you know? We all make different choices, and I can respect that, but I'm just a firm believer in striking out on your own even if it means letting go of things we consider necessities but are actually luxuries.

nelie
07-16-2008, 11:41 AM
Not to beat a dead horse, but since when are these considered necessities?? Cable and internet are NOT bare minimum, they are luxuries. Basic housing, basic transportation, medication, food (that you cook, not that you eat out), water, climate control, enough clothes to keep you in a job... those are bare minimums.


I agree. We don't have cable because it is just too expensive (and we can afford it). We also don't have a phone line because we have cell phones. We do have internet though. I had a friend who was constantly having money issues, borrowing from people and such but she had every channel possible on cable.

If I didn't make much money, cable and internet would be the last thing I'd think about. Buy an antennae, use the internet at a library, rent movies at the library or those $1 boxes on occasion (or budget in Netflix), get rid of any cars and use public transportation, etc.

Smiling_Sara
07-16-2008, 01:22 PM
Not to beat a dead horse, but since when are these considered necessities?? Cable and internet are NOT bare minimum, they are luxuries. Basic housing, basic transportation, medication, food (that you cook, not that you eat out), water, climate control, enough clothes to keep you in a job... those are bare minimums.

I think if you can buy ipods, music, movies, dinners out, wine, whatever... WITHOUT GOING INTO DEBT FOR IT then great!! DH and I have made the decision that some of those things are important to have and so we make allowances for them. But, we give up other things in order to have them. Things like cable TV and going to the movies. We own a 10-year old and a 12-year old car, paid for and kept well maintained. We live in a 2 bedroom house and make due with our second hand furniture. We don't take yearly vacations or spend thousands on Christmas. We've decided that being debt free (except the mortgage) is more important. And, yes, we even rented a 600 square foot, one bedroom apartment when we got married.

What's wrong with not being independently wealthy in your 20's? We all look at our parents in their 40's and beyond and think THAT's the life we should be living, completely disregarding the fact that they are 20+ years ahead of us in life. I think that learning to be fiscally responsible is a huge deal and if you don't learn it now, while you're in your 20's, you'll still be trying to learn it while you're in your 30's and 40's and 50's and the cycle never ends. Learning to stay out of debt and support yourself is a big deal, IMO, and should be treated as such.

I think I'm in the minority here, so I'm preparing to duck from all of the rotten tomatoes headed my way... ;)

Sorry, I forgot the *not* in there. Not including cable and internet. And even without those things, I wouldn't be able to save much. I've even sold all my books and cd's and a lot of my clothes on ebay to help pay down some CC debt. I don't live outrageously at all. Or at least, I don't think I do.

Smiling_Sara
07-16-2008, 01:25 PM
I agree. We don't have cable because it is just too expensive (and we can afford it). We also don't have a phone line because we have cell phones. We do have internet though. I had a friend who was constantly having money issues, borrowing from people and such but she had every channel possible on cable.

If I didn't make much money, cable and internet would be the last thing I'd think about. Buy an antennae, use the internet at a library, rent movies at the library or those $1 boxes on occasion (or budget in Netflix), get rid of any cars and use public transportation, etc.

Thankfully my car is paid for. I also live in to small of a town so there is no public transportaion or I'd be all over that. If I move back home, I will be within a couple miles to my work, which will help lots.

marbleflys
07-16-2008, 01:32 PM
you don't have to defend your position....I think you are making a wise choice. I happen to think that cable and broadband are necessary evils....and public transportation or riding a bicycle (like down a freeway to work) are not always feasible options.

you'll also be more relaxed as you pay off your bills and this will be allow you to focus more on your weightloss goals instead of worrying about saving and debt.....you know you have a long-term goal and hopefully your parents will be supportive. They may even appreciate the fact that you are living there (housesitter) so they have more freedom to go places.

nelie
07-16-2008, 01:40 PM
Thankfully my car is paid for. I also live in to small of a town so there is no public transportaion or I'd be all over that. If I move back home, I will be within a couple miles to my work, which will help lots.

That really wasn't directed at you but just in general. If it was feasible for me, I'd get rid of my car, not because of money but just because it'd be nice to live somewhere and have a lifestyle where a car isn't required.

I also think life without cable is awesome. I can't believe all those years I wasted on paying money to a cable company.

HarpoChicoGroucho
07-16-2008, 07:35 PM
I don't have cable either -- of nearly two years of living alone, I saved $1440. That money I didn't spend on cable went to buying a washer/dryer and my iPod. I do have internet though, but it's $60 just for that (but I had billing problems, and for my troubles, I got a promo rate of $20 a month for a whole year, so when I average it all at, it's not so bad). And cable is another $60 for basic digital! It's ridiculous. I think it's an expense many people can live without, and it helps me with getting my workouts done too -- I can get really sucked into tv and lay on my couch for hours. It's just a plus all around to not have it. :)

Gale02
07-16-2008, 08:03 PM
Sorry, I forgot the *not* in there. Not including cable and internet. And even without those things, I wouldn't be able to save much. I've even sold all my books and cd's and a lot of my clothes on ebay to help pay down some CC debt. I don't live outrageously at all. Or at least, I don't think I do.

BUT, even if you can't save much it sounds like you can support yourself. Why wouldn't you? Little bits of savings over time add up to big amounts. You don't have to be able to save hundreds every month to have an emergency fund... a little bit consistently will build up faster than you think.