100 lb. Club - will too much protein kill me?




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tiredofbeingafatmom
07-05-2008, 03:43 PM
A competition bodybuilder told me to use protein shakes (Whey and Caseins) 2-3 times a day and the rest of the time eat frozen (nuke them) veggies like brocolli, steamed Tilapia 2-3 oz. and the same for chicken breast fillets.

So far in less than three weeks I have lost 13-15 lbs. and not been hungry or felt deprived or had any cravings...:dizzy:

But does anyone know if this will (in the long run) harm me? This friend says he does it to drop any body fat before his competitions and it has never failed him...

Any helpful advice or suggestions are welcomed!


SoulBliss
07-05-2008, 03:46 PM
Too much of anything isn't good. :)

That being said, eating green veggies and lean proteins is a good way to eat for a lot of people.

Remember that we need good fats too and when eliminating variety in your diet, supplementation is suggested.

thistoo
07-05-2008, 03:48 PM
Too much protein can be pretty hard on your liver and kidneys. The more immediate concern, though, is that by cutting carbs that severely, you risk regaining the weight pretty fast when you go back to 'normal' eating. There's no way to sustain that low carb forever, and without whole grains you're not getting a balanced diet.


SoulBliss
07-05-2008, 03:50 PM
The more immediate concern, though, is that by cutting carbs that severely, you risk regaining the weight pretty fast when you go back to 'normal' eating. There's no way to sustain that low carb forever, and without whole grains you're not getting a balanced diet.

Well, there are quite a few low carbers on this board even who would disagree!

Some people just make an entirely different lifestyle and dietary change and do quite well.

thistoo
07-05-2008, 03:52 PM
Well, there are quite a few low carbers on this board even who would disagree!

Some people just make an entirely different lifestyle and dietary change and do quite well.

I am low carbing myself since I am insulin resistant. But the OP's post makes it sound like she's taking in no carbs at all, and that's pretty hard to sustain.

SoulBliss
07-05-2008, 03:57 PM
I am low carbing myself since I am insulin resistant. But the OP's post makes it sound like she's taking in no carbs at all, and that's pretty hard to sustain.

Broccoli and other green veggies have carbs. ;)

I know of people who (long term) eat 50 or less grams of net carbs daily, getting most of the carbs from green vegetables. It *is* something that takes dedication, but it *is* possible.

I think many people who ar IR find low carbing, controlled carbing or low GI the best way to live.

It works really well for those who have addictions to foods too.

tiredofbeingafatmom
07-05-2008, 03:58 PM
Here's an an ammendment to my post...
I am taking a daily vitamin
I am not sure about carbs
Q: Is brown rice okay?

*any suggestions about which carbs? I thought that veggies like corn and peas contain carbs enough for energy?

tiredofbeingafatmom
07-05-2008, 04:08 PM
Here's another question...carbs are for energy, right?
I have not felt a lack of energy thus far.

And I do plan to try to live by this cleaner way of eating...minus the liquid protein after awhile and just veggies, fish andchicken...all of which I love.

FB
07-05-2008, 04:38 PM
I eat pretty heavy protein, lighter carbs. My carbs also come from fibrous vegetables, no flour or sugar. I've never considered myself low carb, although my diet probably qualifies as one.

I sort of go by Burn the Fat, Feed the Muscle's principles on grading carbs. There are good carbohydrates, okay ones and less desirable ones. I eat pretty clean, so my carbohydrates usually make an 'A' grade. To answer your question, brown rice gets an 'A' grade under the guidelines of this book.

I also take protein shakes, take vitamins, eat plenty of fish and poultry.

Losing 15 pounds in three weeks is likely a result of beginning a new diet - BTW- CONGRATULATIONS!, losing some water weight, ect. If it continues at that rate you'd obviously want to look over your plan and adjust from there, as 5 pounds per week is pretty intense.

I don't think this way of eating is unsustainable. Eating lean proteins and getting healthy carbs from whole grains and vegetables works well for me. I don't find this restrictive at all, it seems natural. A typical dinner is a chicken breast or fish, veggies and a salad. YUM, imo. I think of this way of eating based both on protein and volume. I like to be satisfied with the volume of veggies!

kaplods
07-05-2008, 04:42 PM
Carbs are for energy?

I wouldn't say that you cannot, practically simplify to this extent. All carbohydrate sources are not created equally, neither fats nor proteins. Foods provide macronutrients (fat, protein, carbohydrate) generally in a combination, and also provide micronutrients (vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals, antioxidants....)

I think consulting a dietitian, or at least maybe reading a good basic nutriton book, might be helpful. There is some controversy on "optimal" nutrition and what that means for individuals and groups of people, so I'm not sure you'll ever get a "straight" answer that doesn't disagree with someone else's, even given they have the same qualifications and authority to give a respectable opinion.

As for reducing carbs, I think it is a myth that the food plan is unsustainable. Difficult to sustain, given our carb-overloaded society, absolutely! I would even agree with "nearly impossible" to sustain, but for myself I've learned that it is the ONLY plan that doesn't leave me wanting to eat absolutely everything in sight.

I think what makes most "diets," or to use the more politically correct term WOE (way of eating), difficult to sustain, is not the nature of the food plan, but the expectation (even if half-heartedly held) that the WOE for maintenance will be significantly different than the WOE needed for weight loss.

For most people, this isn't true. Weight maintenance needs as much effort, if not more than weight loss. Another huge barrier to weight loss/maintenance success is the idea that perfection is necessary for progress. It is customary, in this culture, to view lapses in faithfullness to a food plan, as a sign of failure, and a signal to abandon it. If I can't "stick to" a plan, I'm expected to give it up.

I have chosen to restrict carbs because I am insulin resistant and two doctors I respect, suggested it. The greater part, is that I find it the only plan that has ever, in any way, curbed my freakishly large appetite. I also know that if I were to stop following the WOE (or perhaps I should more accurately say "when" since I've often done so), I will stop losing and could even regain. Over and over, I've proven to myself that this has to be a WOE for life. That doesn't mean that how many carbs I can eat to maintain (or lose) won't change over the course of my life, but I know that I will always have to monitor it. I will never be able to eat "whatever I want, whenever I want."

Part of the long-term "failure" of low carb plans (and any plan for that matter) may be in people not realizing they will have to always monitor their progress and adapt as necessary. Many "low carb" plans minimize the importance of portion control or "counting" of calories, exchanges... However, I learned that for myself, I will probably always need a backup plan, because of my abnormal response to food. It will always be a struggle, and it will always take comittment and vigilance, and I will always learn from my mistakes. And I will continue to make many, but if I can keep in mind that progress, not perfection, and constant (re)evaluation of that progress will be necessary.

There is no "vacation" from this (at least, not without consequences), which is as true for any other WOE as much as for the low-carber.

FB
07-05-2008, 04:43 PM
BTW - How many calories, grams of protein and carbs are you eating in a typical day? That'd help define how much is too much.

FB
07-05-2008, 04:46 PM
Part of the long-term "failure" of low carb plans (and any plan for that matter) may be in people not realizing they will have to always monitor their progress and adapt as necessary. Many "low carb" plans minimize the importance of portion control or "counting" of calories, exchanges... However, I learned that for myself, I will probably always need a backup plan, because of my abnormal response to food. It will always be a struggle, and it will always take comittment and vigilance, and I will always learn from my mistakes. And I will continue to make many, but if I can keep in mind that progress, not perfection, and constant (re)evaluation of that progress will be necessary.

Yeah, kaplods, as always! The single most important aspect of my diet is to monitor my calories, constantly monitoring everything I take in, the lower carbs are secondary, close, but secondary. These two methods support each other in my success.

It certainly does take commitment and vigilance, but maintenance will too. This has been my biggest failure in the past. Somehow I thought that maintenance would mean returning to my old ways. Nope, healthy is forever, I realize it this time.

PhotoChick
07-05-2008, 05:08 PM
Back to the protein question, sustained consumption of extremely high amounts of protein *may* cause issues with your kidneys. In studies it has only been problematic with people who already have kidney issues ... in healthy adults, lots of protein seems to be quite fine.

But "extremely high amounts" is subject to debate. As much as 1 g per lb of bodyweight seems to be considered a reasonable amount - if more than most people get on average.

.

tiredofbeingafatmom
07-05-2008, 05:10 PM
In answer to what have I been eating every day...
Breakfast @6am: 1 scoop Caseins protein about 22 grams / 100-110 calories (in water or I add instant coffee and sweatner to about 10 oz. of cold water)
*Note: I really LIKE the taste of the shake and it keeps me feeling full until noon.
Lunch is another shake I have pre-made and brought along to work
(but if I am at home I eat about four cups of "Asian style veggies" and nuke a pre package 2oz. portion of Tilapia and mix it all together) The large portion of veggies fills me up until dinner
Dinner: More nuked frozen veggies about two cups (and afew pieces of watermelon here or there)
*Right before bed I make a one scoop of Caseins proteins shake and hit the bed...

So for the past three weeks this has been my routine...am I doomed?
The good thing is, I really love veggies and they are so filling...and I really like the way the shakes taste...
Best of all the 15 pound loss is encouraging to keep going...
I was wondering though about adding a 1/2 cup of brown rice at lunch with my fish? What is the benifit of doing this?

**Note: Thank you so much to everone who has posted and given of their time and knowledge.

PhotoChick
07-05-2008, 05:15 PM
Brown rice is good - it's good for you, a strong source of complex carbs and fiber. I'm a big fan of brown rice.

I'd say you should add some protein of some kind to your dinner - it will help keep you feeling full overnight.

Other than that, I personally couldn't deal with shakes all the time - I need whole food and real food, but that's me. If you are enjoying the taste of the food you're eating and not feeling deprived, I'd say continue doing what you're doing.

.

SoulBliss
07-05-2008, 05:19 PM
In answer to what have I been eating every day...
Breakfast @6am: 1 scoop Caseins protein about 22 grams / 100-110 calories (in water or I add instant coffee and sweatner to about 10 oz. of cold water)
*Note: I really LIKE the taste of the shake and it keeps me feeling full until noon.
Lunch is another shake I have pre-made and brought along to work
(but if I am at home I eat about four cups of "Asian style veggies" and nuke a pre package 2oz. portion of Tilapia and mix it all together) The large portion of veggies fills me up until dinner
Dinner: More nuked frozen veggies about two cups (and afew pieces of watermelon here or there)
*Right before bed I make a one scoop of Caseins proteins shake and hit the bed...

So for the past three weeks this has been my routine...am I doomed?
The good thing is, I really love veggies and they are so filling...and I really like the way the shakes taste...
Best of all the 15 pound loss is encouraging to keep going...
I was wondering though about adding a 1/2 cup of brown rice at lunch with my fish? What is the benifit of doing this?

Geez, that looks like a VERY low calorie diet. Adding in good fats is something you may want to look at too.

If you want brown rice and it fits into your plan, do it!

Have you spoken with a doctor or dietitian?

tiredofbeingafatmom
07-05-2008, 05:27 PM
No doctors, just my bodybuilder friend...
Fats? I love a good avacado now and again...isn't that a "good fat"?

Here's the low calorie thing...I hate exercise. There, I admitted it! So I chose to do this rather than do a single sit up!

What is the benifit of adding brown rice?

Again, I am so in awe of all yall's great info...THANKS!

SoulBliss
07-05-2008, 05:40 PM
Avocado *is* a great fat!

How many calories are you eating? At your height and weight your range could be between 1,600-2,000 depending on your unique metabolism and activity level.

In your case, based on only what you posted, the "benefit" to adding the brown rice would be MUCH needed calories.

I really suggest you speak to your doctor or a registered dietitian and at the very least, read a reputable, healthy nutrition/diet book.

kaplods
07-05-2008, 05:46 PM
Your friend may be knowledgeable, but he may not be. Often for bodybuilders the focus is on muscle gain, not overall health or nutrition.

I think the specific benefits of brown rice - well there are none. None that couldn't be gotten with other foods, at least. It's very difficult to give such specific advise on such a general topic. There is no "one" reason to add any food or subtract any. It's all big picture stuff. Such a big picture, that I'd really recommend a general nutrition book, or even a class if you have an affordable community college available.

My sister is a dietitian, and she recommended the book "American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide by Roberta Larson" to me. I haven't bought it yet, but I'm going to (I'll probably buy a recent, but not the most recent edition from amazon.com to save a little money). Though I have read Nutrition for Dummies, and I thought that was very helpful to me.

I hate most exercise too, so I understand your feelings. Weight loss may be accomplished exclusinvely with diet, but health can't. Exercise isn't optional to health, it's essential.

That being said (and I'm no paragon of exercise), it's vital to find a source of movement that you can enjoy. All movement is exercise, even if it's fun movement. So stop looking for exercise, and start looking for fun things to do that require more movement than you're currently engaging in.

For me, that has been

swimming - LOVE. I could live in the water, and even be VERY active in the water. Only expense (and hating getting dressed and undressed) is keeping me from being in the water, absolutely every day.

bicycling - Well, I BOUGHT a bike anyway. I want to do this more, as there are great nature trails in our area to do so. My husband can't ride with me any more because of balance issues, so I haven't biked at all this summer. I've promised myself to take the bike with us the next time we go fishing, so I can ride the bike trails when I get bored with fishing (which hubby loves).

Geocaching - an electronic treasure hunt. You need a GPS. We can't find ours, so I'm going to see if I can find one in a thrift store or on ebay, as we can't afford a new one. There are low tech versions of this as well (I think they're called letterboxing, there's a lot of information on both online, so just google). There are dozens of local caches, mostly hidden in parks and hiking areas. When I walk without a purpose, I get bored within minutes. When there's a reward at the end, or throughout I'm more motivated.

Walking through museums, zoos, and shopping malls is exercise.

I want a Wii and the Wii Fit software. I want to learn to bellydance (I've done so with the show Shimmy on Fit TV. I want to tape the shows.

There are a lot of fun things to do that requie a good deal of calorie burning. Even for someone my size.

PhotoChick
07-05-2008, 05:46 PM
So I chose to do this rather than do a single sit up!
If you refuse to do exercise, eventually your weight loss will stall and you won't be able to maintain it.

Seriously. There comes a point where you cannot eat less food ... and at that point you HAVE to consider exercise ... movement of some kind.

.

FB
07-05-2008, 06:00 PM
TBH, your calories would be more of a concern for me than the amount of protein. They're awfully low, you'll be at even scarier levels when it comes time to lower them more. I eat much more protein than that, but I do work out. I also use my protein shakes as an occasional meal replacement, all the time as a post workout shake. The amounts I eat were checked out by my doctor and approved.

When I started my plan in January I was unable to exercise because of my size. I HAD to add in exercise once I was down a few and able to, in February, necessary - or I wouldn't still be losing. I would have quit after that month because I wasn't seeing any more results. You know what? I used to despise voluntary exercise, I lovelovelove it now. I'm a lazy, lazy girl but I promise you that exercise is easier than spending the day starving!

The beauty of exercise is not only that it makes you fitter, but you're able to eat a bit more, your metabolism will run higher., you'll be a healthy girl!

BTW, I work out at a bodybuilder's gym and I wanted to add that bodybuilders do that diet right before a competition, trying to get their BF% really low really, really quickly. They don't do that for long, otherwise they wouldn't have that physique. Those dudes are half dead before a competition. Seriously.

Lyn2007
07-05-2008, 06:03 PM
I don't see how your body can function and be healthy long term on less than 500 calories per day. Or did I calculate that wrong?

tiredofbeingafatmom
07-05-2008, 06:07 PM
I know...I know..I know!!!
You are all right, but you just have no idea how badly I want this weight off!
(feel free to read my diet blog, "I used to turn heads")...heres the real deal....
I am sure once (not if) I get this belly down, I won't feel like such a whale in my swim suit and will swim more (which my kids and I love).
I have a bike...my *** hurt so bad the next day...need I say more on that?!
I bought an "Ablounger" and have forced myself to do fifty every morning...I also have "hip-hop abs" which I listen too as I do the Ablounger!!!!

I know I will have to exercise...trust me, the last thing I want is a sagging *** or boobs that look like deflated water balloons (or waving arms!)...I guess right now my focus is on getting some of the initial weight off and then tweaking my program to incorprate more balance between the two. Like I said, I was skinny all my life, so this diet and exercise stuff is all new for me...
I love you all for your input!
I hope I can count on your continued support?
Any other low cal carb suggestions? Anyone?

tiredofbeingafatmom
07-05-2008, 06:15 PM
Question: On the liquid diets don't those people go for like the first three months or so at a very low caloric intake? What about the people who can barely eat after Gastric bypass surgery?

I don't want to hurt myself, just take off about thirty or so then kick up the activities...

SoulBliss
07-05-2008, 06:18 PM
You can count on our support in eating a healthy diet and exercising in a way that's right for you. No STARVATION dieting allowed! :hug:

fiberlover
07-05-2008, 06:24 PM
I know...I know..I know!!!
You are all right, but you just have no idea how badly I want this weight off!


Actually - I think we all do know how badly you want the weight off. ;)
We are all in the same boat. Have you checked out the low carb forum down below? That would probably help you.

It would also be a good idea to count your calories to see exactly how much you are eating in a day to keep it in a healthy range that will still allow you to lose weight.

JayEll
07-05-2008, 06:41 PM
Hey, tiredofbeinga...! :wave:

Looks like you're getting a lot of ideas. First thing I'd say is, remember that your bodybuilder friend is actively working out very hard to build and maintain muscle. You're not doing that, so what works for him may not work for you.

I know you want to get that weight off ASAP, but there are ways to do it that aren't so drastic. You could be eating "real food" instead of shakes and losing as well. :yes: I wouldn't say stop what you're doing--I'd just say, look around and see what other approaches are available. Learn about the food groups, maybe see a dietitian, as others have suggested.

Also, because you do have many pounds to lose, you might do well to consider a plan that is sustainable in the long run. Even your bodybuilder friend uses this approach for the short term, before a competition. Do you think you can do this program for weeks? Months?

And, you'd do well to think about what you'll do once the weight is gone. Many weight loss plans fail at "aftercare," and people stop their program and go back to the old ways of eating. Guess what happens then... :eek:

So, good for you for getting started! Now look around and do some planning. :)

Jay

kaplods
07-05-2008, 06:52 PM
The most persuasive argument against VLCDs (very low calorie diets) is that there is growing evidence that they lower metabolism and cause or contrubute to metabolic changes, even insulin resistance and perhaps even diabetes. So rather than assist you in weight loss, they work against you.

In a very real way, I dieted myself to nearly 400 lbs, because I was always desperate to get the weight off (at age 5, I learned that fat people are freaks, and I desperately didn't want to be a freak). But VLCDs change your body and your mind, and can contribute to the yoyo diet rollercoaster and an ever expanding waistline.

Even when looking at WLS patients. The best statistics seem to indicate that only 40% of WLS patients keep any of the weight off. 60% regain to their original weights or higher.

Theoretically, (if metabolism weren't effective), removing or bypassing a good bit of the digestive tract, should make it virtually impossible for a person to return to their original weight (at least not without eating far more than they ever did before. However, about 60% do gain it all back (and maybe a bit extra) and they do not do so, by eating more than they ever did.

If I had never dieted (instead of being forced to diet at age 5, and being put on prescription stimulant appetite suppressants at age 12 or 13), I strongly suspect that I would have never exceeded 200 lbs. In my mid to late 20's I went through a "fat acceptance" phase of about 2.5 years in which I neither gained nor lost weight. If I had done so at age 12, maybe I would would have stayed 225 lbs. If I had done so at age 5, maybe I would never have been overweight at all.

I don't know, but I do know that starvation diets contribute alot more to the the problem of excess weight, than they contribute to it's solution. They change your metabolism, and your brain (some studies suggest they may actually change the physiology of the brain). They also affect they way you feel about yourself and food.

To reduce to the level of superstition, bad mojo all the way around.

VLCD's are a lot like holding your breath. If you hold your breath, you can do so only so long, before the desire to breathe becomes irresistable. Even if you have ironclad willpower, you will pass out, and begin breathing as soon as you lose consciousness. Now, you won't pass out and start eating, but starvation diets will lead you obsess about food, and eventually obsessing about food will make it difficult to resist. "Giving in" to a binge will seem easier and less miserable than continuing. You will binge, hate yourself for it, and start the whole cycle over again.

Bypass the deadly cycle. Stop it in it's tracks, by doing this the sensible way. Just like women attracted to toxic men, the sensible way may seem like the "boring" way, but sometimes the consequences of exciting are deadly.

I wouldn't wish my 36 years of dieting (well, I suppose 33 years of dieting if you include the 2.5 years vacation I took from it during my fat acceptance days), on anyone. I really think it would probably be healthier for someone to stay overweight and focus on eating healthier foods (even if too much of them) and getting more exercise, than it would be to focus on getting the weight of by ANY means, especially the extreme means that are virtually impossible to sustain.

Some of the research does bear this out, though weight loss and health research, I firmly believe, is still in its early infancy. We have a lot to learn, but what I feel is well established is that VLCDs are harmful in many ways, and unsustainable for long term weight loss.

I know that the sensible way may not be the most appealing, but it does have the best "track record" for long term results.

TwynnB
07-05-2008, 06:59 PM
I'm doing South Beach as a low carb diet, and have been very pleased with the results (stunned, actually).

My problem with the drinks are, can you really keep that up when you get to maintenance to keep the weight off?

I think you need to find a form of diet that works for you, and something that you can live with as a lifestyle. South Beach is great for me (and a lot of other folks too), but it's definately not for everyone.

The people here are awesome!! Browse around the forums and ask a lot of questions! The one commonality.....there is NO miracle pill or diet!! It all takes work!

chick_in_the_hat
07-05-2008, 07:14 PM
I have a bike...my *** hurt so bad the next day...need I say more on that?!

The sore patootie problem can prolly be solved by a gel seat. It also goes away if you keep riding at least like once a week. Really. I swear. :D You don't have to go out for a long ride, maybe just 15 minutes around the neighborhood. It's like new shoes...you gotta break it in.

As for low carb ideas, have you checked out the low carb forums here at 3FC? Tons of recipes there. I'd suggest maybe checking out the South Beach forum as well. It's a pretty healthy plan. I'm a calorie counter myself. :carrot:

I think you just need some edjumacating. ;) You've come to the right place.

:wel3fc:

kaplods
07-05-2008, 07:38 PM
I can so vouch for the gel seat. Hubby and I bought bicycles a couple summers ago. I wasn't at my highest weight, but I was at least 20 lbs heavier than I am now.

I tried to do online research, but I couldn't find any information on the weight limits of bicycles, so I wasn't even sure a bicycle was a possibility at my size. Finally, I had to break down and ask a live person. Hubby and I went to a bike shop, where instead of laughing at us (which I was expecting) the young, skinny, competitive cyclers that owned the shop gave us enthusiastic pointers. They told us to go for simple, sturdy construction (with no springs and fancy suspension systems).

We decided on Walmart cheapies to gain practice on, with plans to buy good bikes when finances warranted.

My hubby (fat, but Mr. No Butt) was fine on the standard seat. I however was in excrutiating pain (both in the butt and more frontal inner thigh region - I think I walked bow-legged for a few days, and didn't let hubby near me, if you know what I mean - he teased me that I had been sexually assaulted by the bicycle, and I sort of felt that way).

The biggest gel seat Walmart sold solved my problem. Hubby can't ride anymore because of balance issues with this nerve and joint problems, but I plan on upping my tolerance this summer and fall. If I can get to the point that I'm on the bike more than an hour, I'm going to start looking online for an even wider gel seat.

tiredofbeingafatmom
07-05-2008, 07:46 PM
I just want to THANK each and every one of you for your input! When I read your profiles and see your sucessful weight losses it is really motivating!

I am going to get an appointment Monday with Doctor and just kinda take it from there...It took me six years to get this way...I guess I need a big helping of "calm down and get a grip baby"!

Love to you all and I hope I can count on ya'll for future support!!!!

MaNdA22
07-05-2008, 08:50 PM
I don't know if any of you have ever watched 'Survivorman' on the discovery channel. He said if you eat nothing but protein for even just a few days your body will get protein poisoning which leads to diarea and dehydration because you're not eating enough fat or something and then you could die.....I dont know if it's true just what I heard.

PhotoChick
07-05-2008, 09:01 PM
He said if you eat nothing but protein for even just a few days your body will get protein poisoning which leads to diarea and dehydration because you're not eating enough fat or something and then you could die.
Uh ... I question this.

If you eat too much of anything and nothing of everything else, you can get sick. Your body needs a variety of nutrients to survive. You need protein. You also need fat. You also need carbs. You also need veggies and fruits. If you deprive your body of any of those for a long time, you'll get sick.

200 years ago sailors used to get scurvy and die because they didn't eat any fresh fruit or veggies on their ships. All they ate was meat and bread for hte most part because it kept better.

But there's a difference between eating 150g of protein as part of a more extensive diet and eating nothing but meat for a handful of days in a survivor situation as well.

.

kaplods
07-05-2008, 09:55 PM
What I believe he is referring to is "rabbit starvation." If you eat exclusively protein, with no fat or carbohydrates, it can make you quite sick, quite rapidly, especially if you do not have excessive reserves of fat (Survivorman, as I've watched it, seems to be assuming that most people lost in the wilderness are not packing alot of extra weight, to begin with).

Also, with more protein, a person does need more water, and if someone were "lost" in the wilderness, they may or may not have access to adequate amounts of moisture to properly deal with a high protein diet.

So, I would advise anyone (in the wilderness or on the couch) not to eat ONLY very lean protein (with no fat or carbohydrates or without plenty of water), but I don't think it's a problem the average person encounters.

Pandora123a
07-06-2008, 01:36 AM
Question: On the liquid diets don't those people go for like the first three months or so at a very low caloric intake? What about the people who can barely eat after Gastric bypass surgery?

I don't want to hurt myself, just take off about thirty or so then kick up the activities...

I did Optifast for 12 weeks...600 calories in the form of five protein shakes per day. Originally the program was designed for 16 weeks, but folks were having too much trouble.

Here's the deal about that.

1) they make you sign a huge release telling you that it is a dangerous diet and has lots of side effects.

2) even on 600 calories a day weight loss slows and stalls. (You want frustration about a plateau, try eating 600 calories and exercising for a week, and don't lose a pound!)

3) once you start "refeeding" it is almost impossible to maintain the weight loss because your metabolism has slowed so much.

When I did it I loss 99 pounds in 24 weeks...it sounds good, but I was also exercising 3-4 hours per day (I would walk aerobically to and from work for 1.5 hours, plus additional exercise) and when I started eating I kept my eating below 1000 calories daily. As soon as I reduced my activity and increased my food at all I started to gain...50 pounds in one year. (Okay, once the weight really started to creep up the exercise diminished and the eating increased as well.)

In the long run I have ended up with kidney problems. A direct result of this? Maybe not, but I doubt this episode was good for my health!

SuchAPrettyFace
07-06-2008, 01:18 PM
Hi guys, I am late to the party as always.

I hesitate to answer questions like this since my mileage varies due to my kidney disease. I know that FOR ME, my kidneys are working very hard to function around the cysts. They have to work even harder to process animal protein. Plant proteins (quinoa, beans, peanut butter, etc) are better for me. I wouldn't see why this would be too different for someone whose kidneys are healthy & normal. Large amounts of animal protein making them work harder? But it would be an interesting thing to ask when you go to the doctor.

I think brown rice, whole wheat pasta, shredded wheat cereal, any kind of grains that are whole & have a lot of fiber would be ok.

knitsforfive
07-06-2008, 03:01 PM
This has been a very informative dialogue.

"Tired...", going to a doctor for help, as long as s/he is well-informed regarding nutrition and weight loss, is an awesome step on this journey. I started by going to my doc, who has been my doc for years, but who recently completed a specialty in bariatric medicine (non-surgical). I was disheartened in the beginning when she didn't offer any quick-fix medications and said she "hoped for" a 1/2 lb. loss per week! Now, I am grateful that I have not used any medications for weight loss (there are several out there right now). I have also lost an average of 2-3 lbs. per week on 1600-1800 calories per day. At my last visit, I asked her why she had originally "hoped for" such a low number of pounds lost per week. SHe said that it is vital that people go into this with realistic expectations in order to succeed and that 1/2 lb. loss per week is more the norm than the 2-3 I am losing. I appreciate that she gave me a dose of reality.

Finally, I had surgery 2 weeks ago and have not been cleared for exercise yet (I was also unable to exercise for 2 weeks before the surgery). I am maintaining my calories for the most part, but without exercise, I have gained a few pounds back. I know how hard it is to start exercising. IT is so vital, though, for healthy, long-term weight loss. A great way to start is to wear a pedometer and figure out your average steps for a few days. Then, increase those steps by a mere 500-1000 per week (this is 1-2 times around the block -- depending on the block). Get to 12,500 per day and you have gotten in your daily exercise! I did this when I had to stop doing any "jarring" exercise. I took four 15 minute walks a day some days to get them in. Other days, when I couldn't take 4 walks, I would put laundry away 1 piece at a time or clean the house by walking one thing at a time to each room. SOmetimes, I would park further away. Other times, I would offer to get things for people in other rooms. Little changes really add up (as much as I have always hated the millions of articles that say that, I must now admit that they are right).

Good luck on this lifelong journey!!

lisaslost
07-06-2008, 04:41 PM
Hi I know there is a lot of info out there. And you had recieved a lot of great suggestions and I have another one for you. Have you thought of putting some fruit in your smoothies? And some flax seed oil (mufas). Add some peanut butter(mufas) (the all natural kind). Maybe some oatmeal cooked and cooled first. You can also get protien from low fat dairy. And dark choclate in moderation is also good for you it contains monounsaturated fats(mufas for short). Avocado are also a mufas all in moderation.

SoulBliss
07-06-2008, 04:50 PM
MUFA = monounsaturated fats, for those who aren't familiar with that acronym.

;)

lisaslost
07-07-2008, 04:06 PM
Soulbliss thank you for pointing that out, but I did put it in my post maybe you didn't read the whole thing.

SoulBliss
07-07-2008, 04:36 PM
I did read it actually, Lisa. :) Apparently the rest of my post was accidentally altered in the "edit". ;)

It's interesting to see that used, as not many lay people are using that acronym, it's not caught on like "EVOO" (extra virgin olive oil, which I refuse to use because Rachael Ray coined it! :lol: ).

bettyred
07-07-2008, 06:18 PM
If you're going to do be doing a lot of protein, make sure it is plant protein- animal protein will leach calcium from your bones if you're over doing it, so take a calcium supplement.

The idea that too much protein can cause your blood to become toxic is true, but only really happens to diabetics. You are suppose to increase your water when you increase your protein, so just be careful that you're not truly over doing it on the protein. Too much protein can- as everyone has said put a strain on your kidneys- the more strain on your kidneys the more strain you put on your heart.

here's a nifty protein calculator :) not sure if the link will be removed but, here's the link http://www.healthcalculators.org/calculators/protein.asp