Food Talk And Fabulous Finds - Where do you find Shirataki Tofu noodles?




azmom
03-26-2008, 11:37 PM
I have never seen them in any of my stores????


zenor77
03-26-2008, 11:46 PM
They are in the same area as the tofu, although I've only been able to find them at our local health food store.

BlueToBlue
03-27-2008, 03:39 AM
My Safeway sells them in the tofu section (which is off to the side of the produce area). I've been told that some Trader Joe's stock them, but I don't think I've ever seen them at my TJ's.


walking2lose
03-27-2008, 06:40 AM
I had a really hard time finding them. My TJs does NOT sell them either (I asked), nor do any of the health food, speciality/high end marketes, or regular markets. Finally, I came to my senses and went to an asian grocery (about 15 minutes from my houses). I asked about them instead of looking, and he took me right to them and they had several different brands. I've been eating them since!

You've probably already heard this, but RINSE really well in colander, and then for good measure (to rid of smell), I have to boil mine for about 3 minutes too.

I bought several different brands at first - one mistake I made was to get one package that was sorta gray - even after boiling they smelled like fish. The guy told me they were exactly the same in taste, just different color for decorative purposes (?). Well, I checked the ingredients and the only thing they had that the white didn't was SEAWEED, hence the fishy smell/taste. I threw that batch away.

Good luck... an asian market may be your best bet too!

Circebee
03-27-2008, 08:34 AM
I find mine at Whole Foods Market! Love them, but, heh, rinse well!

nanj
03-27-2008, 08:56 AM
I'm from Ohio and I found them at the Meijers Department for $1.98 and now at Krogers for $1.69.

nelie
03-27-2008, 09:26 AM
Asian markets are definitely the place to check. They will probably be cheaper there too.

azmom
03-27-2008, 03:25 PM
Ok, you scared me wth the smell thing! Are they really that good????

tommy
03-27-2008, 06:57 PM
When you open the package there is definitely a smell. I dump them in a colander and rinse well, then par boil for a few minutes. I am having the fettucine shaped ones right now with mushrooms, spinach, Laughing Cow light cheese and cottage cheese- all warm and melty. Very satisfying. Hungrygirl.com is a big fan (her recipes are on the back of the House brand ones). She advocates drying them well and nuking for a minute. Have not tried that yet. I also use the white/clear ones without tofu in soups. Bulk and texture with almost no calories and not alot of artificial stuff works for me. Give it a try. Oh- get mine at Asian markets.

BlueToBlue
03-27-2008, 07:05 PM
You should try them. I honestly don't notice any smell.

I tried them in the fake fettuccine alfredo recipe and really wasn't that impressed. But maybe the problem is that I didn't dry them--they came out really watery and the cheese got all runny. Also, I couldn't find the fettuccine shaped ones so I wasn't using the right noodle shape for the recipe.

I also tried them in soup and didn't feel like they added anything. But I do think they would work well in Asian-style noodle dishes. I definitely haven't given up on them yet; I think I just need to figure out the right way to prepare them.

beegoss
03-28-2008, 09:08 AM
I personally really don't like the fettuccine style ones. There's just something about the broadness that highlights the funny texture shirataki noodles have to begin with. The thinner versions, however, are absolutely lovely.

I get mine at an asian grocery store. It's sold in the refrigerated section near tofu.

junebug41
03-28-2008, 11:14 PM
You should try them. I honestly don't notice any smell.

I tried them in the fake fettuccine alfredo recipe and really wasn't that impressed. But maybe the problem is that I didn't dry them--they came out really watery and the cheese got all runny. Also, I couldn't find the fettuccine shaped ones so I wasn't using the right noodle shape for the recipe.

I also tried them in soup and didn't feel like they added anything. But I do think they would work well in Asian-style noodle dishes. I definitely haven't given up on them yet; I think I just need to figure out the right way to prepare them.

I use them only in asian-style dishes such as stirfry. I rinse them really well, and soak them for a bit in garlic and terryaki or stirfry sauce and then saute with veggies (mushrooms, edamame, and the life) and more sauce. I don't stray to far off the reservation with them, but it makes for an incredibly filling meal.

And to the OP, I can't find them in any regular grocery store around here, only at Whole Foods. Though they may be hard to find, they are very inexpensive ($1.24 per bag).

LindseyLouWho
03-30-2008, 12:49 PM
Hm, I never actually thought to look at an Asian market for those... *smacks forehead* DUH! Hahaha. Too bad I wasn't all that impressed with them when I got some from WF. I don't know, the texture threw me off. They were too... rubbery.

murphmitch
04-01-2008, 07:06 PM
I found them in the health food section of my local grocery store (Hy-Vee).

BattleAx
04-01-2008, 08:33 PM
I hated them and they upset my stomach.

chick_in_the_hat
04-04-2008, 09:26 PM
I get them at Safeway....I'm not a fan of the fettuccini ones, either but I like the spaghetti ones.

gastronome
04-05-2008, 02:34 AM
I've seen them at asian stores and vons only. How does everybody like to eat their shirataki? My recent favorite is with some canned low fat clam chowder. For some reason I feel like I'm eating a seafood alfredo. Really tasty and filling!