Exercise! - Exercise induced asthma?




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StillTryin
03-17-2008, 12:49 PM
OK, I have never been a jogger or really a person to get a good workout going to where the heart rate gets pumpin good, but when I joined the gym 3 weeks ago of course I started to do this. Well, I think I have exercise induced asthma. Last night I went for a jog, I couldn't get any air, I was salivating like crazy, a little neausous (sp), and had serious wheezing. So I called my Dr. today to see what he says. I had plenty of energy, but couldn't keep going because I couldn't hardly breathe. Anyone else have something like this happen?
What did you do to fix/resolve it? Thanks!


jamsk8r
03-17-2008, 01:41 PM
Well, seeing the doc may indeed be a good idea, but if you haven't jogged before, you might also think of starting slow, and not just take off jogging, to give your systems a chance to build up to it. The Couch to 5K program, on the Cool Running website (google will turn it up for you), is a sample of how you might ease into such a thing. You start out jogging for 1 min, then walking several minutes, then jogging 1 minute, and slowly it builds you up to steady jogging/running over a period of weeks. You might try that, and also jogging slowly at first, and see how your breathing is with that. It takes time for your heart and lungs to get in shape, just like it does for muscle and bone, so you don't want to just jump into having your heart rate up there for an extended period of time, from what I understand.

Diva
03-17-2008, 02:21 PM
Well, seeing the doc may indeed be a good idea, but if you haven't jogged before, you might also think of starting slow, and not just take off jogging, to give your systems a chance to build up to it. The Couch to 5K program, on the Cool Running website (google will turn it up for you), is a sample of how you might ease into such a thing. You start out jogging for 1 min, then walking several minutes, then jogging 1 minute, and slowly it builds you up to steady jogging/running over a period of weeks. You might try that, and also jogging slowly at first, and see how your breathing is with that. It takes time for your heart and lungs to get in shape, just like it does for muscle and bone, so you don't want to just jump into having your heart rate up there for an extended period of time, from what I understand.

Cheryl is exactly right. You do have to start slowly and allow your heart and lungs to build up. I have had asthma my entire life. I was never allowed to play in P.E. at school or run, but I am determined to do it now. I just carry my little inhaler with me and if the lungs get tight and I start having trouble catching my breath I slow it down a little, but keep moving, take a couple of puff's and then in a couple of minutes I can pick up my speed again. The good news is I am having to use that inhaler less and less. :) Good luck to you and it really is a good idea to see your doctor.
BTW- I'm doing the c25k from the coolrunning site. I'm in week 2. I did week 1 like 3 times, lol!


FluffyGirl79
03-17-2008, 03:53 PM
I agree with everyone else......I also have asthma. I normally take a puff before I start on the treadmill (kind of a preventative measure!), then if I get tight I take another. But like others have said, you'll need it less and less as you build up your tolerance!

Pink Geranium
03-17-2008, 06:38 PM
I do not have asthma but my husband does. (He has also been losing weight, now 196 from 317 2 1/2 years ago, brag! brag!) Anyway, in the beginnning he used his inhaler even to walk a couple of miles - he was just so out of shape and any exercise set off breathing problems. Now, after all this time, he regularly swims 2 miles in an hour, runs, and does kickboxing, and rarely needs his inhaler (either before the workout or during), although he still takes other medication. If he has trouble, he slows down and he also realizes that some days it's just not in the cards to work out hard. Most of the time, he does not even use the inhaler anymore. I think the key was working with the doctor's reccomendations and also building up gradually. His lungs and respiratory system was strengthened gradually as he did this and he was able to keep adding distance, intensity, etc., without attacks. Good luck!

Sheila53
03-17-2008, 06:39 PM
Yes! This happened to me when I first started jogging outside. It was pretty scary, actually. I couldn't catch my breath, and I kept wheezing for quite a while after I got home. My dr. prescribed an inhaler, and I took a puff before running. It helped. But what really helped was just continuing to run and getting my lungs in shape. Now I don't need the inhaler when I run.

StillTryin
03-17-2008, 06:39 PM
Jam-I actually do that walk/jog/walk thing.....it is awsome!

I called my doc and told him what was happening, (he is an hour away) so he called me an inhaler in to the pharmacy to see if that helps, if it doesnt I have to go see him.

Thanks everyone! It is nice to know it isnt me..

I had plenty of energy to keep going, but just couldnt breathe....kinda a scary feeling. I will try the inhaler tonight before going to the gym to see if that helps. I sure hope so.

StillTryin
03-17-2008, 10:17 PM
OMG I got the inhaler, then I used it as directed...I went to the GYM...Holy cow!! Oxygen is AWSOME....I never realized how much trouble I was having breathing until I used it....I was able to jog for 10 minutes!!!!! I was tired when I stopped and not out of breath!!! This is GREAT! I had an awsome work out tonight. I can not wait to tell my Dr. what a difference it made!

bopeep
03-18-2008, 02:37 AM
I'm also a lifelong asthmatic. I've gotten my act together over the past couple of months and started exercising on an elliptical machine. I found that the key to avoiding setting off my asthma was to watch my heart rate. I found the point that I couldn't go beyond, and I hovered just under that (I would get out of breath, but I wouldn't be wheezing or feeling like my lungs were closing off). After a few weeks, I found I could push it a bit higher, and after a few more weeks, even higher. I also take my bronchodilater inhaler beforehand, as that helps big time (as you've just found out).

Once you're in better shape, you may not need the inhaler anymore, but everyone's different. I have a friend that never thought she had asthma until she started running a few years ago, but she now knows the difference between her old 'normal' lungs and her new exercised and drugged up, and functioning lungs, and will never go back :lol:

BP

StillTryin
03-18-2008, 10:31 AM
BeBop, that is how I feel...what I thought was "normal" was definitely NOT. Now I feel better, I breathe easier....what an amazing thing oxygen is..lol

Diva
03-18-2008, 10:55 AM
LOL! Congratz StillTryin! I'm glad you got it worked out! People just don't know how wonderful air is until they can't seem to get enough of it huh? I get so irritated EVERYTIME my fiance' lights up a ciggy. I really hope he quits one day. I make him go outside to smoke too. the smell of it makes me wanna hurl.

FluffyGirl79
03-18-2008, 04:10 PM
I am so happy the inhaler did the trick!!!! :D

pipernoswiper
03-18-2008, 04:58 PM
what kind of inhalers are yall using, i just tried the new albuterol inhaler, and for me its not very effective. also i have just recently amped up my exercise routine, and now i feel like i am having breathing problems, but not on the treadmill, i'm good with that. it's after i get the treadmill that i'm having problems with...........does that even make sense?

bopeep
03-18-2008, 05:54 PM
pipernoswiper - Have you ever tried Ventolin? Not everyone responds well to albuterol or salbutamol (aka Ventolin). There's a genetic component to it - some people do not have the gene/s that allows this drug to work. I obviously have the genetic makeup that allows the drug to work, as it works well for me.

There are other drugs available for quick asthma relief, but their use would depend on the severity, frequency of attacks and weather you have any other underlying health conditions. Some of these drugs are hard on the heart. You might want to get a referral to a respirologist to get the right combination of drugs for you.

There are also drugs that do not provide immediate relief, but work to minimize symptoms all the time - the idea being that you will have less need for inhalers such as albuterol or Ventolin. Inhaled corticosteroids work to suppress chronic inflammation. Leukotriene inhibitors like Monteleukast (aka Singulair) also work to prevent the constriction and keep symptoms under control for many people.

If albuterol doesn't work for you and your doctor does not think you should take other asthma drugs, there are still other things you can do to help you breathe better. If you suffer from reflux, getting that under control will help a lot (reflux is a big trigger for asthma). Sometimes an antihistamine will help if you are breathing in something (dust, mould, pollen) that is setting your asthma off. If you work out at home, getting an air filter with a HEPA filter will help. Also, pay close attention to your symptoms and learn how hard you can work out without triggering your asthma, and stay under that point. Eventually it will improve - it takes a lot longer that you'd like, but it WILL get better.

BP

LaurieDawn
03-18-2008, 08:25 PM
Interesting thread! If I had seen it yesterday, I could have skipped a visit to my doctor - as I am now doing precisely what is recommended here and inhaling a puff or two before I exercise. Breathing is a GREAT feeling.

I did want to add one quick thing my doctor told me, though. I actually did not have any asthma issues when I started exercising in earnest. It only started to act up in October, and then it only happened sporadically, so I just dealt with it. When I finally saw a doctor about it yesterday, he told me that winter weather (something to do with the dryness of the air due to indoor heating) made it worse, and that I may not need to inhaler when spring finally gets here.

KristasMom
03-19-2008, 06:08 PM
Just thought I would add - I talked about this with my allergist before getting into exercise.

I also use my Ventolin before working out, even if I used the long-acting Advair in the AM.

She also prescribed Intal for before working out, if my lungs are cranky, or if the humidity is a little high, or if the barometer is rising. Intal is an older medicine (chromolin sulfate) that athletes sometimes use to just take that "twitch" out.

I agree - exercising with oxygen is AWESOME.