Weight Loss Support - Menopause and Weight Loss - So much more difficult




jtammy
02-09-2008, 11:07 PM
Since I first started losing weight 2 and 1/2 years ago, I've entered full blown menopause, according to my hormone levels. A little early, since I'm 41. Well in the last year, since I was last tested, I've also had to fight so much harder for every lb I've lost. And boy, it has really gotten hard. There is definitely no room for even small cheats anymore, and if I'm not exercising, I'm not losing. So far, I've been very lucky, I guess, in that I've not had some of the other symptoms and discomforts associated with it.

I'd love to hear any tips anyone has for weight loss while menopausal. Or just commiserate with me, if you're having the same issues. :)


CountingDown
02-09-2008, 11:15 PM
:lol: Your post resonates with me, Tammy. I never imagined that it would be this hard. I fight for every single lb. that I lose. I agree that a combination of PERFECTLY on plan eating and exercise is the secret. One without the other does not work for me.

I have found that 6 small meals, consistently eating protein with each of them, and making sure I get a good breakfast have really helped me.

For exercise, I rotate through yoga, pilates, weight/resistance training, and cardio. I try to do either yoga, pilates or weights in the morning and a cardio or weights workout in the evening. This seems to be a good mix for me.

Being a vegetarian, I do incorporate a lot of soy in my diet. This seems to have helped with some of the typical symptoms.

If I had known 5 years ago, what I know now - I definitely would have gotten this weight off sooner! Ah, hindsight ...

Meg
02-10-2008, 05:24 AM
Tammy, menopause happened to me when I lost weight, and probably for the same reasons. You really ARE young, though! :hug:

I was 46 and had periods as regular as clockwork before June 1, 2001, when I started losing weight. When I started restricting calories and doing a lot of exercise, I didn't have a period at all for the first three months. Then there were three semi-normal months, then a period every two weeks for a few months, then nothing. I had the blood tests too, and couldn't believe it when my doctor told me I was in menopause. :fr: (I cried because I felt so old, so can imagine how you feel at age 41 :hug: )

I'm curious what your doctor told you because mine said that it was definitely due to the weight loss. He said that estrogen is stored in fat, especially abdominal fat (which is one of the reasons that it's so deadly) and when we lose a lot of weight, we get a huge estrogen dump in our bodies. And the effect for me was to shut off my estrogen production and put me into premature menopause.

So I lost the weight and have maintained pretty much the whole time while in menopause. And I totally agree with both you and Counting Down that perfectly on-plan eating and exercise is mandatory! We just can't get away with anything, can we? :p

I'm amazed and jealous at the calorie levels that some of our other maintainers can eat and still maintain, but it ain't happening for me (and Tammy, I know that you're hypothyroid like me, so that may be playing into this too). But -- it is what it is and this is my body, so I'll do whatever it takes to keep the weight off. :)

I think that exercise is absolutely essential for post-menpause weight loss/maintenance. We can't create a sufficient calorie deficit or maintenance level otherwise. Without my daily exercise, I would probably have to eat 1000 calories or less to maintain and I am definitely not going there!!

So when you reach a point that you're stalled out and not losing but don't want to lower your calories any more, the only thing to do is increase exercise. It doesn't necessarily mean more TIME -- it can be increased intensity. Studies show that we burn more calories and fat with interval cardio (periods of moderate intensity cardio interspered with high-intensity sprints). That kind of cardio elevates our metabolisms and keeps us burning calories for hours afterwards.

And of course, weights are critical for post-menopausal women. The message is finally getting out and I love seeing all the older women lifting weights now in my gym! :D It's great for preventing osteoporosis and maintaining and building our declining muscle masses. And of course, what could be more fun that being a mom with muscles? :lol:

Counting Down has exactly the right exercise mix -- cardio for calorie burn, weights for muscle maintenance, yoga for balance and flexibility, and pilates for core strength (I need to work on those last two). :cp:

Tammy, I wish I had the Magic Pill because I'd be taking it too! But I think you, Counting Down, and I know what we have to do. It's tough to stay focused all the time, but ... when I think of what the alternative is, then it's an easy choice.


sharonrr1
02-10-2008, 06:27 AM
Once againg Meg I've learned something I didn't know. I am also in Menopause at 46 and my doctor knows how much weight I've lost and never said anything about the connection.

Meg
02-10-2008, 06:36 AM
Sharon, I think that those of us who have lost a lot of weight without surgery are the orphans of the medical system. Doctors don't know what to make of us and sure can't seem to answer our questions! Whenever I ask my PCP a question about metabolism after weight loss or skin or anything like that, she always says she doesn't know and that I'm her ONLY patient who ever lost this much weight, let alone kept it off. So she's learning from me.

I think doctors just don't know very much about what happens to our bodies when we lose a lot of weight without WLS. It just hasn't been studied.

JayEll
02-10-2008, 08:09 AM
My weight loss was after menopause, and I don't know whether it was easier or not--I just had to work with whatever it was! But my own experience is that increased exercise is a key for weight loss, and 3 times a week won't do it for me if I'm trying to lose. It has to be 5 or 6. Exercise is what will allow me to lose without eating 1200 cals all the time, which is very hard. :stress:

btw, I was delighted to get rid of my periods. I found them a complete bother and never equated them with anything positive. Good riddance! :D

Jay

rockinrobin
02-10-2008, 08:54 AM
I'm another one who got thrown into early menapause due to the weight loss. It's just about 9 months now. My doctor said 1 year without my period is when I can consider it really "official". But she says my estrogen levels are so low - it's for all intents and purposes over with. I was 43 at the time, I turned 44 in November. I had horrible, horrible, HORRIBLE periods, due to a large fibroid (that I might have to remove one of these days), so on that level, I'm glad they're over with. But I can't help but think what have I done to my body, sending it into forced menapause and I see a big obesity factor in the causes of fibroids.

Anyway, yes, I certainly can commiserate with you - it IS harder to lose and MAINTAIN weight loss. There really is no room for "error". Again, all my doing and it angers me at times when I stop to think about it. Luckily, that isn't too often - I'm too busy exercising and chopping up veggies in order to stay on plan - ;).

Meg
02-10-2008, 09:17 AM
Wow, I can't believe that the same thing has happened to so many of us!

Mel
02-10-2008, 01:08 PM
Add me to the list; my story is exactly the same as Meg's but I was thrilled. I had endometriosis which caused incredible pain for about half of each month, so menopause was a delightful side-effect of the weight loss. I don't eat soy, but have rarely had any menopausal symptoms since about 6 months of hot flashes in my early forties.

Mel

baffled111
02-10-2008, 01:24 PM
menopause was a delightful side-effect of the weight loss. Mel

:lol: I wish it would be a side-effect of my weight loss! Having periods is annoying.

I wonder if there are actual studies about early menopause and huge weight loss. Does the National Weight Control Council (is that what it's called?) ask about menopause?

Meg
02-10-2008, 01:32 PM
I've done four or five NWCR surveys and they've never asked about menopause or really any other side effects of weight loss, like excess skin. Their surveys focus pretty strictly on what maintainers do to keep the weight off, eating and exercise-wise.

Thank heavens the NWCR exists, or else we'd have virtually no scientific knowledge about weight maintenance -- but there's a crying need for so much more research. Don't you think that if people knew in advance what ALL the challenges of a large weight loss are that they'd be better prepared for maintenance? As it is, most of us are clueless about keeping weight off and what life after weight loss is like.

In the meantime, our best resource is our ever-growing group of maintainers here at 3FC. :)

AnnRue
02-10-2008, 01:57 PM
Tammy, menopause happened to me when I lost weight, and probably for the same reasons. You really ARE young, though! :hug:

Oh great. I am 37 and my periods have gone right off the chart lately (come 22 days - 34 days - when before they were regular). My doctor insists that I would be too young but seeing this thread did I push myself closer to an early menopause! Great.

But I did want to say I am also having to fight for every lb now. I think it may have more to do with getting closer to goal than any hormone changes. I have decided to give up dieting in the winter because it is counter productive to have me attempting to diet and kind of failing daily because I couldn't get the exercise I needed or couldn't be as strict as the summer usually allows me.

lilybelle
02-10-2008, 02:16 PM
Add me to the list of going into menopause when I started losing weight. I was 45 at the time. I also find that keeping the weight off is extremely challenging. For me there is no room for straying, a small infraction results in a gain for me everytime. Without my exercise, I also would not be able to eat more than a 1000 cal's a day (regardless of what the calorie counter charts show).

jtammy
02-10-2008, 02:20 PM
Wow, so interesting to hear from all of you.

Actually, there was an 11 year stretch where I did not go to the doctor because I was ashamed of my weight (yes, I know how stupid this was and I think I could have benefited from a massive dose of anti-depressants during a large chunk of those years but that's behind me and I can't change any of that), and during many of those years I had awful, awful, horrid periods. Robin, they sound similar to yours. Some months I half-jokingly compared it to childbirth, it was so very, very heavy and painful. By the time I took control of my health and started losing weight, I had already quit having periods (so that's been at least 4 - 5 years ago). It was a huge relief, like Jayell said, to not have a period anymore after those last few horrid years. I wasn't seeing a doctor at the time, but I can't say my weight loss caused it as much as my weight may have caused it. I didn't think to ask her if the early menopause would have been caused by my weight or weight loss, although in my mind, weight loss couldn't be the culprit because I stopped having a period years before I started losing weight. Of course, my FSH levels just dropped to the level where it can officially be said that I'm menopausal, so maybe that is contributed to the weight loss. :shrug:

Meg, You're right! I'll do whatever I have to do to keep the weight off and if I can't eat at as high a calorie level as some of our lovely maintainers (and I already know I can't) that's ok.

I'm reading a book right now called "The premature menopause book" and I was surprised that the book didn't list weight or weight loss as one of the possible causes of early or premature menopause. A few medical websites that I looked at did.

I just have to tell you all that it is wonderful to see you inspiring losers and maintainers telling me that it is definitely possible to lose weight, maintain weight and go through menopause. :)

CountingDown
02-10-2008, 02:30 PM
I just have to tell you all that it is wonderful to see you inspiring losers and maintainers telling me that it is definitely possible to lose weight, maintain weight and go through menopause. :)
AMEN!

jtammy
02-10-2008, 02:41 PM
And of course, weights are critical for post-menopausal women. The message is finally getting out and I love seeing all the older women lifting weights now in my gym! :D It's great for preventing osteoporosis and maintaining and building our declining muscle masses. And of course, what could be more fun that being a mom with muscles? :lol:



Oh yes, she did stress to me how important is was to be taking calcium to prevent osteoporosis. Actually, I've tattooed on my brain what she said, which was "Now that you're thin and healthy, you need to be concerned about bone density and osteoporosis". She went on to explain how those of us who enter early menopause are at more at risk. But for a few seconds there my brain replayed the thin and healthy bit over and over. :) Now that I think about it, it's a shame that she didn't mention lifting weights. I know from reading here and other places how weight training can slow bone loss, but I'm not sure the average person who isn't particularly interested in health and fitness would know that. And that's a weakness of mine. I piddle in it, but I've not yet gotten a good routine set up.

AnnRue, I've wondered if it is so difficult because I'm getting closer to goal or because of the menopause issue also, and I don't know the answer either. Not that it matters either way, does it, because regardless of the cause, we still have to do that same thing.

murphmitch
02-10-2008, 02:51 PM
I went into menopause about 12-18 months ago after having a hysterectomy (left my ovaries in) about 6 years ago. It's kind of tricky, if you aren't having periods, to figure out exactly where you're at, but my doctor did hormone levels last year and I was having the typical night sweats, headaches and hot flashes. I gained about 10# in the last year despite staying on weight watchers and exercising (I'm on an estrogen patch too). I recently started South Beach cuz I figured my metabolism is really changing too. I am thrilled that in the last 5 weeks I have lost 12#. :carrot: I don't know if my body isn't processing carbs as well or what. I do know that on weight watchers the quality of some of my "points" was not good, so I guess cleaning up my diet and eating more veggies, less simple carbs & processed foods has really helped me get back where I want to be. My next goal is to start using resistance exercises more. I hate weight training, but I am planning on seeing a personal trainer at my gym & getting some advice with it.

suesully
02-10-2008, 03:01 PM
I'm amazed and jealous at the calorie levels that some of our other maintainers can eat and still maintain, but it ain't happening for me ...

What a wonderful & informative thread!! I went into instant menopause when I had a hysterectomy due to HUGE fibroids. I was 45 at the time & fairly chunky. I continued to gain weight even though I wasn't really eating that badly & was fairly active. None of my doctors mentioned to me that I was eating at the calorie level for women NOT in menopause. The calorie charts, BMR calculations etc. had me at 1800 cal/day...I was eating less than that & still not losing. Exercise didn't help either.

It wasn't until I started my last diet that I discovered the fact that I needed much lower calories. Even though most diet sites state that one should not have less than 1200 cal/day, I had to drop mine down to 1000 to lose consistently. I'm just approaching maintenance & figure that it may be in the 1100-1200 range (up to 1400 when I am super active). I'll get to experiment with that soon! :) I do know that I have to watch carbs carefully & get most of my carbs from veggies & fruit rather than breads & starches.

All of my doctors have not been helpful in the weight loss department. Their solution was to eat less & do cardio. No mention of weights, if fact my current physician gets annoyed when I mention it. Thank goodness for online support...it was there that I got my information...and finally got slimmer. :D

susiemartin
02-10-2008, 03:23 PM
I went through menopause at 42 - I'm 54 now.

I never noticed too much of a difference with menopause until I hit my 50's.
Then my weight loss efforts became more of a challenge.

Exercise has been the only thing that really has been able to make a dent.

Meg
02-10-2008, 03:24 PM
Suesully, I don't think we've "meet" before here at 3FC and I just have to congratulate you on your weight loss! :bravo: Wow, are you really only two pounds from your goal? What an amazing journey this must have been for you! Please come join us in the Maintainers forum -- you don't have to be at goal to post there and I'm sure you have so much insight and wisdom to share! :)

AnnRue
02-10-2008, 07:16 PM
It wasn't until I started my last diet that I discovered the fact that I needed much lower calories. Even though most diet sites state that one should not have less than 1200 cal/day, I had to drop mine down to 1000 to lose consistently.

Well I am not in menopause and I admit I have to eat much lower calories to lose and maintain that most. I have been doing this for a while and I am not sick or malnourished so I think that it is just what I need to eat.

Maybe everyone just needs different amounts.

I have a friend who is past menopause and she eats the wrong calories 1800. I have tried to tell her to eat less, but her doctor insists she needs to be eating what the charts list, and I think that is wrong for post menopause. She isn't gaining but hasn't lost.

Heather
02-10-2008, 08:10 PM
AnnRue -- I don't think losing weight and menopause are inevitable. I started losing weight at 39 and lost 100 pounds in just over a year. I haven't hit menopause yet (now I'm 42).

I don't know if I should look forward to menopause or dread it. I'm leaning toward dread. I hate change.

PaulaM
02-10-2008, 08:10 PM
I just missed my first period last month, I'm 53 1/2. I won't be sorry to see the back of them, that's for sure.

jtammy
02-10-2008, 08:34 PM
I wasn't sorry to see the end of my periods either. It just seems like a "change" for the better. Although I do feel like I'm entering another "phase" of my life with this.

rockinrobin
02-10-2008, 11:47 PM
I wasn't sorry to see my periods go at all. Tammy, like you, there were times I felt as if I was going through childbirth all over again. And the bleeding was soooo heavy, I was forced to stay pretty close to home for the first few days, not to mention that I would get it every 21 -24 days or so and it would remain with me for 7 days at a time, so I was practically always with it. I lived on Advils. I haven't taken one since I lost my period. It was good riddance for me.

You know until this thread came about, I simply forgot that I am in "menapause". I mean I knew my periods had stopped, but I guess I never really equated it with being in menapause. Kinda dopey of me. I guess I'm still waiting to hit the one year mark, like my doctor told me to. But yes, I do have to consume less calories then most in order to lose and now maintain. I always thought it had to do with the fact that I was morbidly obese for so long and therefore messed up my metabolisim and also the fact that I am so short. But now it makes perfect sense that the fact that I'm "in menapause" is a factor.

ZedAus
02-11-2008, 03:38 AM
OK... just count me as one of the 'weird' ones. About 5 or 6 years ago my gynaecologist told me it appeared as though I was perimenopausal. Mind you, I hadn't had a period for about 8 years while I was obese, and the ones I was finally having were due to the contraceptive pill, so didn't really count I don't think. Well, since losing weight, I got my first 'natural' (pill free) period just over two years ago and my periods have been more regular in the past 6 months than they have been since I first started at the age of 11.

So, I have a funny feeling that my 'perimenopausal' time of my life seems to have disappeared. I even had night sweats and hot flushes for quite a few months, so I was SURE that menopause wasn't far away. But I haven't even had any of that sort of thing for over 6 months. I have a feeling that I may have to go through it all again some time. *sigh*

I'm not really sure what is going on, but my doctor seems to think everything is just perfect, so I suppose I won't worry for the moment.

Zelma

GirlyGirlSebas
02-11-2008, 02:47 PM
Like Suesully, I went into instant menopause when I had a full hysterectomy (no ovaries) in 2005. Even though I was only 41 at the time, I made the decision to have the surgery due to several large fibroids and due to the loss of my Mom to ovarian cancer in 2004. The lastest information on fibroids indicates that women with this condition have a much higher level of estrogen in their system. I wonder if this is why I started gaining so much weight right around puberty? I've had a weight problem since I was 9, but I gained an additional 75 pounds within 2 years of my hysterectomy. Like most of you ladies, I must fight for every single pound I lose. I have noticed that, when I'm on-plan and consistently losing, I have a much harder time balancing my hormone therapy due to the release of extra estrogen from my fat. Boy, do I get grumpy. I've found that regular exercise not only helps me to lose, but also helps with the grumpiness. :D I've noticed that my oldest daughter is extremely emotional around her TOM and she has a tendency to put on weight easily. I'd love to find a doctor who can tell me if she is estrogen dominant so I can help her get balanced. But, our healthcare system just hasn't caught up enough with women's issues to help much.

horsey
02-11-2008, 02:54 PM
I'm 39 and I was SHOCKED when the nurse asked at my last checkup, are you STILL having your period. I feel younger then I am I guess and it doesn't seem like a question for 39, sooooo... isn't it a transition, even before menopause, to admit that our child bearing days are about over, or they are over? I see some stars getting pregnant at this age, and really I don't yearn for another child... it's just I'd like to have the choice longer. My boy is 3 and I'm an older, now single mom. What's with perimenopause though? Someone said I might be in that as I have such mood swings. Herbs and clean eating seems to help.

rockinrobin
02-11-2008, 03:03 PM
Horsey, perimenopause is the time before menopause occurs and changes begin. It can last for up to 5 years.

Here's some info on it:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/perimenopause/DS00554

jtammy
02-11-2008, 03:15 PM
Rhonda mentioned hormone therapy and I guess I should have asked my doctor about this. Without symptoms such as hot flashes, insomnia, mood swings, would I still benefit from hormone replacement therapy? I've brought a book (Ageless by Suzanne Somers) home from the library about bio-identical HRT and the author and the doctors that are interviewed seem to believe that most women would benefit from it. I haven't finished the current book but in a previous book (The Sexy Years , same author) she talks about how bio-identical HRT can even help with weight loss.

I probably need to talk to my doctor, but I'd love to hear anyone's advice or take on it.

Meg
02-11-2008, 03:27 PM
I take HRT (the conventional kind) due to extreme symptoms, like nonstop hot flashes. I've questioned my doctor closely about the risks and she feels that the studies showing increased risk of heart disease and breast cancer aren't well-done and not applicable to younger women (I guess I'm "younger"!) She's actually a big proponent of HRT and says she can always tell by looking if a woman is on it or not (she mentioned better skin and more youthful appearance). She's never said anything about helping with weight loss, however.

From what I've read, there's not much difference between conventional HRT and bioidentical except that one is FDA regulated and the other isn't. But there's been some news lately about the FDA clamping down on compounding pharmacies selling bioidentical hormones.

Tammy, I think that talking to your doctor is a good place to start. :)

gailr42
02-11-2008, 05:17 PM
I may have a small bit of good news to report. I was 65 last year, so that puts me squarely in the post-menopausal group. I am not taking hormone replacement medication. I have not reached my goal and have not lost any weight for about three months.

The good news is that I have maintained my 38 lb loss during these three months. I have never, ever maintained any weight loss before, menopausal or not. I think the reason I have maintained this time is that I have actually established some really good eating habits. The big three - low fat protein - many veggies and fruits - whole grains.

I think perhaps my (ahem) more mature attitude towards my eating habits may be partially offsetting the difficulty age brings to weight loss/maintenance. Whatever it is, I am very happy. Because I have been able to maintain for a bit, I feel hopeful that I will eventually be able to loose the last 15 lbs and keep it all off.

Also good news: during this short experiment in maintenance, I have not been one bit hungry. I was afraid I would have to starve for the rest of my life, but not so far. Someone on here said she thought maintenance would look like a stick of celery and a forty mile walk:lol:. Scary thought.

jtammy
02-11-2008, 06:14 PM
Gail that's great news! I had to chuckle when you said your mature attitude towards your eating habits help. I think I was just finally the right age to try to lose weight. I half heartedly tried when I was younger, but just never got it right. They say age brings wisdom, and for me and my eating habits, I guess it finally did. I really admire these 20 somethings and younger who can hunker down and lose weight, because I just couldn't! :)

A celery stick and a 40 mile walk, huh? Oh if I thought that was ahead of me, I'm not so sure I'd be fighting so hard to get to goal. ;)

Heather
02-11-2008, 06:15 PM
Someone mentioned being on the pill. I guess I should ask my doctor the next time I see her, but if you are on the pill and enter menopause, would you still get your period?

Add me to the finally "mature" enough to lose weight. I wish I had been able to figure it out when I was younger, but I made lots of half-hearted attempts and excuses...

tinygrammy
02-11-2008, 10:07 PM
I had a hysterectomy (partial) when I was 40. I am now 54 and am smack dab in the middle of menopause. I was gaining weight like crazy (40 pounds last year!) and my doctor just continued to yell at me about dieting. I was soooo frustrated. Finally last November he tested my hormone levels and determined that I'm menopausal. So, I'm on a hormone patch. I said all of that to say this...today is the first day of my new life counting my calories and now I'm not so sure I'm counting in the right range in order to lose weight. I was going by what was said in the counting calories group. Should I adjust those calories down now, because I sure would hate to gain weight now that I've started dieting! LOL Jackie

CountingDown
02-11-2008, 10:20 PM
Jackie - they are a pretty smart bunch of chickies over there. Why not give it a try for a couple weeks and see how you do. If you don't lose, you can begin to "tweak" your calories and exercise until you find the right mix. For me, it really was trial and error. AND - I have had to make adjustments as I went along. I know it is confusing at first, but it will get easier as you learn what works best for you. Come back often and let us know how you are doing!

jtammy
02-11-2008, 10:36 PM
Hi Jackie, CountingDown is right. It's never an exact science, it seems to always be trial and error. You might as well try what they suggested first, and if you aren't losing, you can tweak down some. I don't think they would have suggested a high enough level to actually gain. Welcome by the way, I don't think I've seen you post before.

murphmitch
02-11-2008, 10:54 PM
Rhonda mentioned hormone therapy and I guess I should have asked my doctor about this. Without symptoms such as hot flashes, insomnia, mood swings, would I still benefit from hormone replacement therapy? I've brought a book (Ageless by Suzanne Somers) home from the library about bio-identical HRT and the author and the doctors that are interviewed seem to believe that most women would benefit from it. I haven't finished the current book but in a previous book (The Sexy Years , same author) she talks about how bio-identical HRT can even help with weight loss.

I probably need to talk to my doctor, but I'd love to hear anyone's advice or take on it.

I read Suzanne Somers' book too. I asked my Dr. about it (She prescribes bio-identical hormones) and she said she believes that Suzanne is having injections of hormones and not just topical ones(She doesn't really address this in the book, very vague about what she actually takes). She thinks that she is pretty radical, especially in light of the fact that she has a history of female cancers. I was prescribed bio-identicals for several months (Bi-est & Progesterone cream) as well as oral DHEA. I had absolutely no improvement in symptoms until I went on an estrogen patch. With a patch, your medication goes right into the bloodstream & bypasses the GI tract & the liver. She said this reduces the risk of breast cancer. She also recommended only short term use of HRT while a woman is symptomatic, and starting it right as your going into menopause, not in older women who may have more issues with cardiovascular disease.

JayEll
02-12-2008, 07:14 AM
I recently read a book by an M.D. who thinks that most people, men and women, are "estrogen dominant," which means they have too much estrogen in their bodies, compared to progesterone and other hormones, and this leads to weight gain, cardiovascular problems, and a whole list of illnesses. He believes that progesterone treatment is a better way to go than estrogen treatment. Just something to look into--I don't have any more details than that.

If you do a google search on "estrogen dominance" you'll come up with some sites to look at.

Jay

GirlyGirlSebas
02-12-2008, 10:47 AM
Jtammy - I've done tons and tons of research on the subject of hormone therapy. The only absolute answer I've been able to find is that medical science has sorely neglected women in this issue as they have in many other issues and there is a lot that we just don't really know for sure. I can tell you that, after much trial and error, I have finally found a wonderful doctor that practices a wonderful balance of conventional and alternative medicine. I am now on a bio-identical combination of estrogens, progesterone and testosterone and I have finally found the perfect combination for me for right now. Of course, as I lose weight, my combination will need to be adjusted as the hormones in my body fluctuate. But, I can say that I've feel better now than I felt for the first 1 1/2 years after my surgery. I finally feel almost normal again! :) I have my energy back, my positive outlook, I'm less irritable, I'm finally losing weight again....and, dare I say...the libido seems to be kicking back in.:o IMO, nothing is as wonderful as the hormone balance that God created, but bio-identicals are a great second alternative.

polkadotfever
02-13-2008, 12:54 PM
i think i may have you all beat. i had a hysterectomy a year ago and i'm in my 20s. talk about not being prepared!!! :dizzy:

i take bioidentical HRT and my doctor specializes in menopause and HRT. she told me that hormone imbalance can cause weight gain and cravings that are out of control. she told me i have no choice but to start getting my butt to the gym if i want to lose weight post hysterectomy and she told me that i have to live on fewer calories than i did before. so far i'm finding all of this to be true.

i'm just grateful that i'm still able to lose, even if it is harder than it was before. it was never easy for me in the first place. it may take more work and more time but it is definately doable. (personally i think it's worth the trade off just to not have a period anymore) ;)

Meg
02-13-2008, 01:55 PM
Oh my gosh, Polkadot, you're so young to be dealing with menopausal issues at your age! But I have to commend your positive attitude toward weight loss -- no pity parties for you! Kudos, that's the kind of thinking that will get you to goal! :bravo:

polkadotfever
02-13-2008, 02:42 PM
oh well i'll be honest. tis a newfound positive attitude i have. i'm finally over my year long pity party. i decided once i hit the year mark i'm going to pick myself up dust myself off and march back down to a healthy happy weight. this surgery took my ability to bear children away, it took time away from my job and friends and it took a great emotional toll on me. but i won't let it make me fat to boot. just not going to happen. and i'm pleased to say i've lost 5 pounds in the last week and a half. :carrot:

:cp:

jtammy
02-13-2008, 08:05 PM
Polkadot, :hug: I'm glad you're here! Good for you for taking control and not letting it keep you down! You are very inspiring. Congrats on your weight loss too; that's a wonderful way to start off.

BattleAx
02-13-2008, 09:11 PM
I'm wondering if the rate of weight loss has anything to do with sending the body into menopause. If one lost weight very slowly, and the hormones from the melting fat were then being released at a slower rate into the body, would that lessen the chance of flipping the menopause switch?

There's probably no answer, as it seems there has been very little research in this area. But, I have been thinking about it.