100 lb. Club - Isn't losing a lot of weight kinda like having an eating disorder...




BrandNewJen
01-25-2008, 04:40 PM
Of course, I am NOT taking ED's lightly and I am not in any way saying they ARE the same (I have an MA in psychology for heaven's sake!)

But I know alot about eating disorders... and for those of us who are desperately trying to lose the weight, we certainly share a LOT of the obsessive behaviors that are frequently found in your classic ED cases.

Intake watching, intensely focused calorie counting, documentation of everything that goes in our mouths, exercising to make up for when we aren't behaving perfectly, talking ALL the time about our weight and what we're doing, thinking all the time about our next meal, what we're going to eat, what we want to eat, what we can't eat...

Weighing ourselves obsessivly, checking our appearance constantly, double, triple checking EVERYTHING in our lives...

It certainly is kinda "disordered" thinking, don't you think.

Yes yes--- those with ED's have distorted thought patterns and self-images--- we think we're fat b/c we ARE fat, unlike others. YEs, there are many clinical differences. But I'm just talking about a lot of the physical manifestations.

Just an interesting thought to ponder, ladies.... :?:


bargoo
01-25-2008, 04:43 PM
I prefer all the calorie counting, obsesive weighing.documenting, etc..........to 206 pounds on my 5'2" frame.

BreakingFree
01-25-2008, 04:50 PM
I don't do any of the things you've mentioned and I've lost 70 pounds and kept it off for several years. I suggest investigating "mindful eating." I'm also a huge fan of Geneen Roth's books.


BrandNewJen
01-25-2008, 04:53 PM
Do tell, BreakingFree---- how did you do it then without watching carefully what you eat and checking up on yourself all the time/

Glory87
01-25-2008, 04:56 PM
Of course, I think anything taken to extremes isn't a good thing.

When I was heavy, I ate completely mindlessly. If it tasted good and was in front of me, I ate it. I never once thought about the calories or fat content or my health.

Now, I eat mindfully. I do read labels, I do want to know the calorie counts of food (because it's often completely mindblowingly huge). I go online to read the nutritional information for a restaurant because I want and need to make good choices, for my weight and my long term health.

I have found that I can't eat healthy by accident - I have to go to the grocery store and buy fruit, I have to pack lunches. I have to plan healthy meals because they just don't happen. If I don't bring a piece of fruit to work for a snack - my only snack options are the the junk in the machine.

I weigh myself to stay accountable - once a week.

The things I DON'T eat - I don't eat because they are terrible for me - fried foods, fast foods, packaged baked goods, cream based sauces and soda. I don't think I'm obsessed to not want to put terrible things into my body.

Do I have a disorder if I budget my money and don't overspend? I try to look at food and money in a similar way. I have a calorie budget and if I go overspend, I will get heavy. I have to plan and budget to stay within my limits, just like money. Why is it considered laudable to carefully budget and plan money and a disorder to carefully budget and plan food? They both have repercussions if you go beyond your limits.

I am aware and mindful and slender and much happier than when I ate whatever I wanted without ever thinking or planning or counting. Now that I am maintaining my weight loss, I only estimate my daily calories, I don't feel like I'm obsessively counting.

Moosegirl
01-25-2008, 05:08 PM
I guess you could look at it that way but I am not obsessing over things like that. I just take it one day at a time, no calorie counter, no points zilch… for me it’s just better eating and more exercise, simple common sense I hope. I don’t have the patience to be counting calories!

Trazey34
01-25-2008, 05:13 PM
I kind of hate food being on my mind all the time - like making 3 times as much chicken for dinner so that i have it for lunches coming up, etc., stuff like that...I'm careful and mindful but i like to think i'm not obssessing LOL, but maybe that's wishful thinking ;)

fiberlover
01-25-2008, 05:15 PM
Well - you could look at it from the other angle. Isn't being very overweight a disorder as well?
I like to think of the counting, measuring, weighing and all that is involved with losing weight to be like medicine or a treatment plan for my obesity. I don't know any other way to view it.

amouse
01-25-2008, 05:23 PM
i believe there is nothing wrong with staying focused but like anything else it can be taken too far .. but i defiantly agree there is and obsessive behavior pattern in weight loss.. the thing is there kinda has to be for some people.. i find it easier to sat on track when i monitor everything... and i know i am a little obsessive about it .. but i have to be or i loose focus.. i dont discuss it with other except on this board but i will eat foods for there nutrient content and plan meals around which ever nutrient / vitamin i am low on for the day.. lol I have no desire to take multi vitamins so i want to make the most out of my healthy food lol..

Meg
01-25-2008, 05:23 PM
What I do now is ordered eating. What got me to 257 pounds was disordered eating. Mindful eating, as Glory put it so well, is not an eating disorder. It's a necessity. :)

BreakingFree
01-25-2008, 05:26 PM
Different things have worked for me at different times. Getting in touch w/ the emotional triggers for my overeating, both through therapy and extensive reading (again, with a heavy emphasis on Geneen Roth's books; I can't overstress how helpful they've been for me) has been essential. I also don't care how long it takes me to lose the weight; I've been on this "journey" since mid-2002. I find the concepts of "mindful eating" and "listening to your body" to be difficult to practice but very useful and I'd like to be more consistent in using these tools. I also do not "ban" ANY foods and just try to focus on healthy choices and/or the best choice I can make in a given situation. Exercise is also key but I really have not been very consistent with it. Currently I am getting free telephone weight loss coaching through my husband's employer. It has been much more helpful than I expected and keeps me motivated and focussed.

Everyone has what works for them. Just know that there are ways to lose weight that aren't punitive and onerous.

BTW, I have 30-40 more lbs to lose. I wish all the best to all of us in our efforts.

Jolly Molly
01-25-2008, 05:28 PM
I understand what you're saying, Jen. My previous weight loss attempts were just like what you described. I was obsessed with what I could eat, how much I could eat, how I could burn it off and how much I weighed. I finally couldn't take it anymore and just longed to be "normal" and stopped monitoring anything at all. And I gained back all the weight I'd lost and more.

As you pointed out people with EDs have disordered thinking because their weight is normal and therefore doesn't warrant such behavior, but I am fat and I'm going to stay that way unless I have some oversight of how much I eat and how much I exercise. Of course even someone who needs to lose weight to be healthy shouldn't be obsessed with it all. So, is it the unhealthy obsession that makes it an ED regardless of whether you're overweight or underweight? Is obesity in and of itself considered an eating disorder?

KateB
01-25-2008, 05:35 PM
I think the ED is what made us ...well me I can't speak for everyone...overweight in the first place. I come from a family that is riddled with addictions. Some have alcohol addictions, some have cigarrette addictions, some unfortunately have drug addictions. Mine is food. It is funny how somehow people make outward changes in their life to help and encourage a recovering,drinker, smoker, or drug addict, but not the recovering over eater.

Like my family...Since Jamie quit drinking we don't have alcoholic beverages at family gatherings. Since Marcia and George quit smoking no one smokes at family gatherings. IF Carl is going to be there we clean out the medicine cabinet and lock up the contense. But have we ever had a family gathering with healthy low calorie foods??? Then on top of it family make comments like..."well turkey isn't fattening" (No the turkey isn't but the 3 sticks of butter it was basted with is) "You should eat the vegetables" ( Well the green beans are ladenwith cream soup and the carrots are glazed with butter and brown sugar) or how about, "Go ahead and have a little slice of pecan pie...how much can it hurt?" (Now would she had Jamie a bottle Jack Daniel and say 'a little sip won't hurt'??? I DON"T THINK SO!!)

I know I have an addiction...an addiction to food. So if calorie counting, weighing myself, planning for the next meal is an ED. Well I for one would rather have this ED than the one that got me to over 300 pounds in the first place.

valpal23
01-25-2008, 09:42 PM
I had struggled with ED habits as a young teen.
I never really resolved my issues. I went from starving myself to proving that I liked myself by eating.. to emotional eating when my health decided to call it quits. It's been very dysfunctional.

So personally for me, I have to keep my mental voice in check. I dont think I would consider my diligence with calorie counting now as dysfunctional/obsessive behaviour. I try not to get too caught up in it all.

(hopefully that makes sense-seriously sometimes I think working in bureaucracy has made me unable to do anything but talk in circles!!)

Robin41
01-26-2008, 12:34 AM
Do I have a disorder if I budget my money and don't overspend? I try to look at food and money in a similar way. I have a calorie budget and if I go overspend, I will get heavy. I have to plan and budget to stay within my limits, just like money. Why is it considered laudable to carefully budget and plan money and a disorder to carefully budget and plan food? They both have repercussions if you go beyond your limits.



This is brilliant and I am totally going to steal it. I will be passing this thought off as my own for years to come. It absolutely captures the essence of trying to eat in a healthy, responsible manner.

I, for one, got fat because I looked at food in a totally unhealthy way. It wasn't fuel; it was a cure for boredom or stress. I don't think anything I do to behave in a more logical way towards food could be considered disordered.

kaplods
01-26-2008, 12:47 AM
I think the reason I've found it so difficult to lose weight and keep it off, is that I've used disordered patterns of behavior to try to lose the weight. The obsessiveness, the bizarre thoughts and behaviors, the horrible feelings of shame, disgust, and self-hatred. They don't have to be part of a person's life, whether you're trying to lose weight or not, and if they are present they cause problems in one way or another. I think we expect a certain amount of the disordered "crazy" thinking to just be part of dieting, but I think it's more optional than we realize, and also more detrimental.

BattleAx
01-26-2008, 12:55 AM
I have had disordered eating since I was a child. My relationship with food may not be totally normal now, but this is where I am, and I am doing what I know will lead me to good health. I'd rather not think about it, seemingly like some of my thin friends, but not thinking about it got me over 300 lbs. Clearly I am a person who needs to think about it. And, if I think about it more than I do other things, it's partly because I'm where I am psychologically, and partly because that's what I need to do. I see this as my best chance for improving my relationship with food over time.

When I go off, I no longer do the destructive things I used to do. Or, at least now I know they are destructive, and when I see myself heading in that direction, I pull back from the abyss. No more crazy exercising or severe restricting after a slipup. No more binges that go on for months and years because if I messed up one day I must be a total failure. No more beating myself up for lack of perfection. I do the best I can every day. Some days are better than others, but each day is a new opportunity to deliberately take care of myself.

I love Glory87's analogy to budgeting, and that's what it is. I'm not used to living on a food budget that is neither severely restricted nor bottomless. So it takes time and effort. It may always take more time and effort than it does for others, but this is my new normal. It is as normal as I can be.

BattleAx
01-26-2008, 12:55 AM
Great post, kaplods. That fits my experience as well.

JayEll
01-26-2008, 05:45 AM
I don't think it's ED, although for some people it might get that way. I'll echo what some others have already said--I just didn't pay attention to what I was eating other than it tasted good and I wanted to eat a lot of it. Now I'm paying attention. Yes, it's different to pay attention, but it's not a "disorder."

I think we ought to be careful about labeling things.

Jay

rockinrobin
01-26-2008, 10:36 AM
It's no disorder. It's being responsible. With the thing that matters most in life - our health.

It's not obsession - it's dedication. With the thing that matters most in our life - our health.

modkittn
01-26-2008, 10:50 AM
I don't think Jen was trying to say that we all have eating disorders, just that some of the things that most people do in order to lose weight in a healthy way are some of the things that people with EDs do (journal, possibly thinking about food often, trying to find ways to "fight the urge to eat those free donuts that someone brought into the office", etc). Although I would argue that "exercising to make up for not behaving properly" is not a healthy way to approach weight loss and can lead to an ED mindset.

The real difference is in the mindset. We are trying to lose weight for our health and we are trying to do it in a healthy way. People with EDs (and I used to be one of them) do not have this mindset. Sometimes the reason for ED behavior is not even rooted in weight but in control (as was mine). I think people wanting to lose weight have to gain some control in order to do so (primary objective being weight loss), while some people with ED are trying to gain control and that is really their primary objective even though to others it may not be that way. I am not saying that all people with an ED are like this, just that this was my experience.

rakel
01-26-2008, 11:24 AM
I believe I had an eating disorder before I started losing weight. Like a person throws up after they eat in private, so I would chow down on sweets, chips, etc in private, knock back an entire chocolate bar or bag of chips and feel ashamed of myself for the lack of control I had over what I put in my mouth. What was stopping me from being bulimic? Honestly, I just didn't want to force myself to puke -- something I like to avoid, but I don't think I was too far from that, just in the opposite direction.

Getting healthy when you NEED to get healthy, as others are saying, is not like a disorder. I would say if someone is 5'6" and 135lbs and pretty healthy, if they start going on a mad diet to lose 20lbs, hating themselves... etc... they are exhibiting some kind of disorder that may play out into anorexia or bulimia. Essentially, these two disorders are based on people trying to LOSE weight, but they are a far cry from what I'm doing right now to lose weight for sure!

pamatga
01-26-2008, 03:08 PM
I don't believe every one who has participated on this web site has an eating disorder but I do believe most do have a weight issue. We all have a common goal: to lose weight and regain our health. Yes, it would be ideal if others would understand but it is not necessary to my recovery that they do as much as it is that I do! Blaming others does nothing to resolve your weight lose issues. Taking responsibility, even that means buying your own food and preparing it separately from others, will. I know, I have been there and done that until one day I awoke and realized that no one was going to make me happy but myself.

I am a recovering compulsive overeater, overspender AND codependent person! I have always said I have a "three fold addiction:FOOD, MONEY AND UNHEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS". There was a time when I really and truly "could not help myself". I was acting in a very crazy way. What was up I thought was down. What was black I thought was white. I didn't know it at the time but that was who I was. Along the way, I had to also learn to accept my past and, yes, forgive myself for it. There is a saying I remind myself: Forgiving myself is giving up the hope of a better past. I did the best I knew how to at the time. The same could be said for today. I want today to be better but it is going to be as good as I can make it. No more and no less!

Then, I stepped into my first 12 Step meeting on May 5, 1995. As far as I am concerned that is where my addiction ended and my recovery began. I remember seeing people lose a lot of weight in what seemed like a short period of time and never seem to have a problem. I wanted what they wanted and I felt so frustrated. Why was it working for them and not me?

NOW, I know why. It took me 12 years to be able to trust my Higher Power enough where I could take Step 3-"turning my life over to God as I understand God" I found it easier to do Steps 4-11 and I did made strides in my overall maturity and emotional make-up but I just couldn't trust something/one outside of myself to be able to let go of all of this weight. Now, that I can trust God I am being lead to how I should eat, what I should eat and how much. I am not relying on my own "well intentioned but flawed" efforts. I have fooled myself in the past and I don't want to make that mistake again.

Now, I know that I will lose this weight. I have had to give up control over how much, when and how long. It will come off when it is ready to come off. Oh, did I mention that I also had to give up control, obsessing, perfectionism, pride, people pleasing ------to name a few, among other character defects, to be able to "release" this extra weight?

My food plan which includes both portion control and restrictions on what kinds and types of foods I eat is a TOOL. It anchors my efforts. It sets up boundaries. If you have ever been a parent you know that there are some rules you set not because you are being mean but out of love. Eating the right foods for the right reasons is an act of self-love.

I do keep a food diary, an exercise chart and a weight lose chart. I see them as compasses that guide me towards my goal of a normal and healthy weight. Whether I was to lose weight, make my first million or run the Boston Marathon, I would need a plan so I could prepare, monitor and then finally acheive my goal. "If you don't know where you are going, you are probably going to end up somewhere else." Determination not obsession is what you need to succeed. Don't confuse the two!

We are all here to teach and learn from each other. Don't put us on a pedestal or make us a hero. We're not. We are no different than you. We all have our weaknesses and strengths. We have our own individual challenges. We have our hopes and our dreams. If we fail to live up to your ideals, don't worry because you will probably not be able to live up to yours some days as well. Don't stop trying or believing that you can do this and you won't disappoint yourself. Remember, when you cross that finish line we will be there waiting for you!

I want to end up at Thanksgiving 2008 at my goal weight. That's my plan.
Every decision and choice I make today and all of my tomorrows will contribute to me attaining that. And, I am as clear as bell about what it will take to get there too.

Jennifer 3FC
01-26-2008, 04:13 PM
Hi, Jen! I understand exactly what you are saying. But I think what maybe you are seeing compared to some of the others is just the angle in which it is looked at. I think Meg hit it on the head that before it was disorder, and now it is order. My guess is you are working at this so diligently and carefully, and this may be a 180 from your old life. So it may not feel normal at all! :)

FluffeyNutter
01-26-2008, 08:31 PM
hmmm...is it really an eating disorder if most women think these things whether they are fat or not? I think the ones who don't aren't the norm and therefore are the ones with the disorders. :P

BrandNewJen
01-28-2008, 12:25 PM
"Go ahead and have a little slice of pecan pie...how much can it hurt?" (Now would she had Jamie a bottle Jack Daniel and say 'a little sip won't hurt'??? I DON"T THINK SO!!)

Good point--- that's one thing I've always said when people say "overeating is an addiction and you get over it just like you get over any addiction"

I say "well, guess what? You can STOP smoking completely. You can STOP drinking alcohol completely. You can't stop EATING completely!!!"

ANYHOW... just as a clarification... I don't think my diet is an ED, in case that's the impression you got. I was just playing devil's advocate, stirring up some discussion. The points I brought up were all things I've garnered both from my own life and reading the varied posts here on 3FC.

Some times I look at how focused I am at losing this weight (My mom says I'm "calorie obsessed" but that's just b/c she doesnt' want me pointing out how horrible she eats and the little things she can change to lose weight) and wonder how easily someone could slip from losing weight to dangerously losing weight.

Hmmm.

rockinrobin
01-28-2008, 12:38 PM
Good point--- that's one thing I've always said when people say "overeating is an addiction and you get over it just like you get over any addiction"

I say "well, guess what? You can STOP smoking completely. You can STOP drinking alcohol completely. You can't stop EATING completely!!

Some times I look at how focused I am at losing this weight (My mom says I'm "calorie obsessed" but that's just b/c she doesnt' want me pointing out how horrible she eats and the little things she can change to lose weight) and wonder how easily someone could slip from losing weight to dangerously losing weight.

I've definitely come to the conclusion that eating, overeating that is, must be an addiction. And I do believe that we can never be "cured" of it, but I do think/know that it CAN be controlled. And I've said many, many times how I wish I were addicted to cigarettes or alcohol because you can do totally without those things and therefore it has GOT to be easier then the food. Who knows?

And IMO being calorie obsessed or dedicated as I like to call it, is a good thing, a VERY good thing. It's that dedication and DETERMINATION that help me to shed the pounds and now is helping me to keep them off - forever. Good luck to you!!! You are doing FANTASTIC. Keep it up. :)
Hmmm

Lyn2007
01-28-2008, 01:10 PM
No doubt in my mind that I got fat because I have an eating disorder. It is NOT NORMAL to sit and eat a 9 by 13 pan of brownies all by yourself in one sitting, or 3 dozen cookies. It is NOT NORMAL to keep eating even when you are in physical pain from stuffing your stomach beyond it's intended capacity, beyond nausea, beyond your body screaming at you to stop. But that's what I did for ten years. And I WANTED to throw up. I wanted to use laxatives. I tried. I got such bad cramps and was in the bathroom for hours and still gained weight. I could never get myself to throw up effectively either. Good thing, because I would definately have become bulemic. But there was a time I sat in the bathroom and cried because I had eaten an entire supreme pizza and a 2-liter of coke, and couldn't throw it up. THAT is definately a disorder.

Stopping that destructive behavior is the healthy thing to do, and that is what I am doing. Since I started losing weight in August, I have not done those things anymore. I have overeaten but not like that. And I have banished any thoughts of wanting to purge.

LaurieDawn
01-28-2008, 01:41 PM
Very interesting discussion, Jen, and one to which I've given some thought over the past few days.

While not going too deeply into my eating past, I have to say that I am sure I do have an Eating Disorder, and have had one since my early teens. But my behaviors then and my behavior now are very different. Just like a recovering alcohol or drug addict will spend a lot of time thinking about those things, particularly when they are trying to remove the habits from their lives, we think a lot about eating, exercise, and related things. But - I have spent some time on pro-ani and pro-mia sites because I was interested to see how people could advocate EDs. Their lives are completely about weight issues. And though the food requires a lot of my attention now, I am no longer under the control of the compulsions that used to dominate my life - although I do relapse once in a while.

So, my conclusion is that many of us do have EDs, but our lives now are about finding ways to cope with those EDs in healthy ways and to overcome the destructiveness that the EDs have had in our lives. And just like with any other addiction, it will take time, energy, and attention to maintain the habits that allow us to avoid being under the control of the eating disorder. The biggest difference for me between now and then is that the work that I have done to get my ED under control has had an enormously positive impact on the rest of my life, in direct contrast to the destruction and chaos caused by living under the control of the ED.

Switzie6
01-28-2008, 02:28 PM
No doubt in my mind that I got fat because I have an eating disorder. It is NOT NORMAL to sit and eat a 9 by 13 pan of brownies all by yourself in one sitting, or 3 dozen cookies. It is NOT NORMAL to keep eating even when you are in physical pain from stuffing your stomach beyond it's intended capacity, beyond nausea, beyond your body screaming at you to stop.

I did those exact same things. I felt so out of control and miserable. I felt really alone, like I was the only person ate that way and had to hide everything I ate. Though I'm sorry other people had to go through what I did, it's a comfort to know I'm not the only one. I feel so much better now! I would rather be obsessed with logging my meals and counting calories then sitting alone stuffing my face again.

shelby897
01-28-2008, 02:42 PM
I've been very interested in this thread -- many, many good points.

I, personally, find that dieting/lifestyle change is my way of controlling my eating disorder -- so I can positively say it is "the medication that controls my disease", not a disease in itself. It makes me aware of my faults, makes me take a step back and decide if something I eat is for an emotional fix or for actual nutrition, etc. Although counting calories can become an obsession for me, I'm trying to put food "in it's place" and not obsess so much about the things I can't have and enjoy the things I can.

I think you create an eating disorder out of food control -- either loss of control of what you consume or too strict control over it -- but it's all a matter of the "happy medium" needed to lose weight in a healthy way, with no rigid restraints.

chunkomommy
01-28-2008, 03:10 PM
Hi !

Is it an eating disorder?? hmmm.. this is a very valid and thought-provoking question. It got me sitting here thinking about it and yes - maybe it is one but, maybe I just think that because it I haven't thought (or realized) that perhaps I already have an eating disorder and that's why I now weigh this much. I LOVE (I repeat - LOVE) food and didn't see what I was doing to myself by enjoying it whenever I wanted (and don't forget I also ate WHATEVER I wanted). This in itself is an eating disorder much like drug users, alcoholics and gamblers - it is self-satisfaction. In a way it's a means to an end, only for the end to NEVER arrive.

So now I ready to LOVE (I repeat LOVE) myself and take care of me, my body,mind and soul. I have others who rely on me everyday (my kids and hubby) and I wouldn't do drugs, drink or gamble if it hurt them so, why do I do this???

I'm on the road to recovery and just like other addictions it's a one-day-at-time thing and maybe it's good that it's on my mind. If it wasn't then maybe CHEESECAKE would be on my mind instead! ha! ha!

Keep strong and keep going!! We are all here and ALL want the same thing!

chunkomommy

zenor77
01-28-2008, 03:35 PM
I think that the American Food Industry is the one with the disorder (I'm including the government agencies that so call "police" the industry in this statement.)

BrandNewJen
01-28-2008, 05:09 PM
"I think that the American Food Industry is the one with the disorder "

I agree--- like I've posted elsewhere, should it really even be LEGAL for a place to sell a Triple Stacker Burger with over 1,000 calories?!?!!? I mean, seriously, how is that healthy for ANYONE!?

They just simply shouldn't be allowed. It just shouldn't. ::sigh::

kimmieone
01-28-2008, 06:50 PM
As laid back about weight loss as I am, I don't do most of that stuff. But, ok. I want to drop pounds I do what I have to, but you could say that about a job. Is it disordered to check your work a few times to make sure you've done it correctly. Is is disordered to check several times to make sure you don't run over a kid in a parking lot. What I'm saying is improving ones health does take some attention, just like anything worth while in life.

LisaF
01-28-2008, 09:17 PM
But I know alot about eating disorders... and for those of us who are desperately trying to lose the weight, we certainly share a LOT of the obsessive behaviors that are frequently found in your classic ED cases.

Intake watching, intensely focused calorie counting, documentation of everything that goes in our mouths, exercising to make up for when we aren't behaving perfectly, talking ALL the time about our weight and what we're doing, thinking all the time about our next meal, what we're going to eat, what we want to eat, what we can't eat...

Jen, I know exactly what you're getting at. My very first post on 3FC was me saying that I was afraid that focusing on losing weight would trigger my ED behaviors, most of which I have fully overcome. Because I would rather be fat than obsessed with every aspect of what goes into my mouth, I have refused to engage in most of these behaviors. I know that calorie counting, journaling, etc, work for a lot people, but for me I fear that they're a one-way trip back into binge eating.

Lisa

shelby897
01-28-2008, 09:58 PM
LisaF -- I agree with you -- I can go from obsessing over what I will shovel into my mouth to obsessing over what I'm not going to or can't eat. I'm still working on the happy medium -- counting calories, journaling, etc., at least to me, puts too much emphasis on the food -- exactly what I do when I binge, etc. As soon as I tell myself I can't have something, that is all I think about until I eat every last crumb of it and then some. I think with an ED you will always have a power struggle -- but taking control is not a disorder in itself, but can become one if I'm not careful of my approach.

nylisa
01-29-2008, 05:09 PM
See, I tend to think my behavior was more compulsive when I was actively overeating on a regular basis. I wasn't paying attention to my body's cues on hunger, instead just stuffing it with mindless eating. Just as someone with anorexia would starve hers and not pay attention to her body's cues on hunger. Both are health endangering in their own way. Anorexics may have more immediate heart problems, but having eaten my way to obesity, I was getting warnings from doctors.

I pay much more attention now to whether I'm actually hungry or not.