Weight and Resistance Training - Lifting while you're still sore from the last lift?




sportmom
01-19-2008, 09:52 PM
I'm sure we've discussed this before and probably said that as long as there was a long enough recovery period, you should go ahead and work out and it might make you feel better. Mostly it's my quads - I just couldn't get up the desire to work them when it still hurt to walk/sit. So luckily I woke up today without the soreness and got a workout in this afternoon. They were still tight when I did my squats and my wallballsits, but it felt good to work them out, not like yesterday where I could barely chug thru it on the t'mill.

So I don't know if there's a right/wrong answer but just thought I would share. I enjoyed my nice homemade strawberry protein smoothie within 30 minutes afterward as well. :stir:


Lifeguard
01-20-2008, 11:35 AM
Sometimes doing a good warmup with active (not static) stretching can relieve a lot of the soreness, allowing you a good workout.

lalala123
02-12-2008, 06:59 PM
This is something I was wondering about. When I go to the gym (not as often as I should :frypan:) I like to get as much time with the machines (I know, free weights are better, I'm learning about them now :D) as I can, so I'm usually all sore the next day. :o
Last week I did work on different areas each of the (two) times I went to the gym, but when my muscles hurt I get kind of worried about overdoing it / hurting myself, and I don't really know how much I could/should do. Also, I'm less motivated to go to the gym if I think that I should avoid using whichever body part is hurting at the moment. If that makes sense. :dizzy: (I'm a total newbie to this.)

I have worked sore muscle (I took it easy, though) and it did feel better after that. I guess I'd just like to read more experienced people's opinions. :^: - Is it good to exercise sore muscles? How hard/light should the workout be? What are the main benefits / dangers of working out before the muscles stop hurting?
And why do they get sore in the first place? - Oops, never mind, the wiki page on "Delayed onset muscle soreness" (can't post link, but if you search for that there you'll get the page I was reading) says there really isn't an answer for that. :lol:

Anyway, I'd love to read about everyone's opinions and experiences. :D


(PS: I hope it was ok to post on this thread instead, I didn't want to start a new one because it is the same topic.)


Depalma
02-12-2008, 07:39 PM
If I'm still sore from a previous workout, I'll usually add an extra warmup set or two and the soreness normally works itself out. If it doesn't I'll try to continue with my working set anyway. However, if at any point I notice that I'm compensating for the soreness by seriously altering the range of motion or form, then I'll push my workout schedule back a day and get in some intervals or steady state cardio.

sportmom
02-12-2008, 10:35 PM
In just reading the Weight Training book I posted about in the other thread, they remarked that while there was no definitive research on it, they did recommend it was probably a good idea to wait for pain to subside before working out again. And pain is on a continuum - is it just a little achy, vs feeling it when on the stairs, vs can't even get up or down on the couch and being achy. I think different levels of soreness call for different plans as well.

GatorgalstuckinGA
02-13-2008, 07:55 AM
my personal trainer (who is receiving a masters in sports therapy) always wants me to work the same muscle the next day after a hard workout. But she said i need to do very light low reps. In other words if the previous day i did bicep urls with 25lb wts, the next day i do bicep curls with 3 or 5 lb wt. What it does is repeats the movement and gets the lactic acid moving out of the muscle group. It really has helped with my soreness. Also you need to streth multiple times. After a hard workout, i stretch that night, the next morning, and the next night. I find if i do all of that...then i'm not really sore.