Weight Loss Support - Question about the Biggest Loser.. How are they doing it?




CountryGirl18
01-02-2008, 04:54 PM
Im very curious how these people are losing so much weight in 1 week. I know its normal to pull a big number the first week you start trying to lose weight, and that number could be bigger if youre a bigger person. But there was a girl on there who was 204, and lost 14 lbs. Does exersize really play that big of a part of weight loss. I know these people are confimed to a campus and have nothing else to do except work out, but I didnt think exersize could make you lose that much in such a sort amount of time. Is there something im missing, or is it really just working out 4-5 hrs a day, and thats how they lose this much weight?


mandalinn82
01-02-2008, 05:03 PM
I love this question!

First off, the weigh-in periods are not a week, even if they present it as such on TV. They tend to be longer, and vary from week to week. Usually, the weigh in where everyone seems to be pulling crappy numbers is a 4-5 day period, and the one where everyone pulls great numbers is a longer period.

Second, YES, if you are doing cardio for hours and hours each day, not to mention lifting, you are going to lose lots of weight. If you have NOTHING to do, day in and day out, but focus on your weight loss, you will lose faster. You're also building TONS of muscle, so their metabolisms rev harder.

Third, they are eating CLEAN CLEAN CLEAN. Very medically supervised, very protein and veggie based. That makes a huge difference - no splurges ever means no temporary water gains.

Fourth, they use some less-than-savory tactics pre-weigh in (including not drinking water/eating to dehydrate themselves after the "last chance workout", or getting in the sauna, so they lose water weight each week). I've read some articles about what goes on right before the finale, and most of them do some sort of dehydration technique to increase the percentage of water lost.

Mizu
01-02-2008, 05:05 PM
They are losing water... pounds of it. They are exercising, sweating, and dieting. That loses a lot of water weight. In fact, most of that 14 pounds is water since you can only lose 2 pounds a week in a healthy manner (it's possible to lose more through extreme starvation, but that's different). They only say she lost 14 pounds to encourage people to keep watching the show.

Also, if she weighed in at 13.5, they'd round it up to 14 as well. The bigger the number, the more shock value.


GatorgalstuckinGA
01-02-2008, 05:08 PM
mandallin hit it right on the nose...that's why i'm sort of torn with the show...i like to watch it...but i'm also realistic. I think it can be a big let down for people who don't remember those facts that mandallin stated. Remember it looks like a week...but its not...and most importantly...this is their life now 24/7 with out temptations/interruptions. I think if you aren't realistic...you can become very disappointed expecting to see the same results as the show. Ithink its great that its encouraging wt loss...but for most of us...we won't be able to have the same drastic results. Remember 1-2 lbs per weeks wt loss is healthy...and anymore than that...you are doing other methods that might not lead to good wt loss.

Suzanne 3FC
01-02-2008, 05:20 PM
mandallin hit it right on the nose...that's why i'm sort of torn with the show...i like to watch it...but i'm also realistic. I think it can be a big let down for people who don't remember those facts that mandallin stated. Remember it looks like a week...but its not...

I haven't watched it since the first season for those reasons. They never said it wasn't really a week between weigh-ins and even I didn't know until Amanda told me. I've always felt that they did a disservice to those struggling with weight as well as their friends and families because they were all left confused about what was realistic. I love to see people lose weight, but I get a bigger thrill out of watching someone lose it in a safe and sane way. Unfortunately, that isn't exciting enough for television. They should call it unreality tv.

misschris531
01-02-2008, 05:59 PM
I watched the Biggest Loser last night because I do think it is fascinating. However, I was MAJORLY turned off by the way they present the weight loss. I have been watching since the first season and it seems like every season, the weight losses per "week" get larger and larger. I felt terrible for Jenni because she "only" lost 7 lbs, and even her jerkoff dad rubbed her face in it. It usually takes me a month or more to lose 7 lbs. I think I will keep watching, because there is valuable information on the show, and the relationship stuff is a draw (yeah, I'm a sucker!), but at the same time I am completely unconvinced. My favorite part of the show, anyways, is when they show the people who left and how much weight they've lost since they've been home. I think that is the most "real" part.

ennay
01-02-2008, 06:15 PM
I have problems with the show in that weight is all that matters. They had awhile back the show where they were saying what factors everyone improved the most on and one woman had GAINED 11 pounds of muscle - more than anyone else. That is incredible, but that put her in a lower place for weight loss and she was in danger of being kicked out.

My biggest peeve with the show though was the first episode i ever watched. (and really I've only watched a couple episodes) It was a finale and they compared the % weight lost and the runner up lost by quite a bit. But the truth of the matter is...she had no chance. If she had lost the same % as the winner, she would be dead. She would have had to become seriously underweight to match the loss he had.

I still think the comparison should be % of EXCESS weight or something a little more leveling. Bodyfat measurement instead of the stupid meaningless scale.

Glory87
01-02-2008, 06:16 PM
If I were a contestant on the Biggest Loser, I would completely water load the first weigh-in (in my opinion, it would be stupid not to) so my first week's weight loss would be really really significant too.

I love the show for lots of reasons, but I hate the way it might make a regular person feel like they are a failure if they lose 2 or 1 lb a week - that is FABULOUS but would be complete loser-dom on the Biggest Loser. It's a very artificial environment and I wish that more contestants would speak to the fact that the results are extremely atypical.

The most weight I ever lost in a week while I was losing weight was 3 lbs (and I was ECSTATIC). I still lost 70+ lbs, took a little longer in the "real world" but it was still REAL and impressive, even at 1-2 lbs a week.

I also hate the fact that building muscle is NOT rewarded. In the first season, body fat percentage was a huge component of the overall win (the contestants were dunked in a tank the first weigh-in and last weigh-in), they haven't mentioned body composition since the first season and the significance is HUGE!!!!

Skinny4baby
01-02-2008, 06:23 PM
Is it just me or does it almost seem "hush hush" about what they eat? They never really go in to detail what there diet is...sure they talk about it a little..and most of the time that is all about advertising. It would be nice if they sharwd more details about exactly what kind of diet they are on instead of so much focus on the exercise??

mandalinn82
01-02-2008, 06:36 PM
Skinny4Baby - they have a book with the diet. They also published it in "Prevention" after Kae did the photoshoot last season. It is a whole-food, reduced carb, low-fat, severely calorie controlled diet.

misschris531
01-02-2008, 06:47 PM
How cal-controlled? (How many calories, as an example?)

jiffypop
01-02-2008, 07:00 PM
i had no idea about any of this!!!! my goodness! maybe i should start paying attention???

mandalinn82
01-02-2008, 07:04 PM
A lot less than you'd think, because they have to fuel all the exercise. I think it works out to 7 times your weight in calories (approximately) from whole sources. So a 200 lb woman would eat 1400 calories daily. I'd eat only 1120 calories for loss.

JayEll
01-02-2008, 07:07 PM
Here is a one-day sample menu from Biggest Loser (Prevention website):

http://www.prevention.com/cda/article/biggest-loser-diet/0c31385a75ed5110VgnVCM10000013281eac____/weight.loss/diets/biggest.loser/biggest.loser.diet

You'll see that they measure everything--there is no guessing!--and there are lots of vegetables.

Jay

L144S
01-02-2008, 07:10 PM
Jiff you are too funny!
Happy New year BTW, I hope it is a good one for you and some of your "stress" lessens.

I like the show and i tend to walk on the TM when it is on. It is not so much about the food resrtiction, which is no suprise. They are in a fairly clean environment but they do have temptation challanges and i m amazed at how many of them do it!

i don't quite think it is fair to have men and women compeating against eachother as women will always have a higher body fat.

I think you are right about the WI periods, some are 10 days others are 4-5

I am not sure if I like the idea of couples on one hand but think in the long run it may be a good thing. Either way i will continue to watch because it modivated me to see the struggles , work out more and think about where i want to be in the end.

mandalinn82
01-02-2008, 07:13 PM
This may seem cynical, but....if my winning $100,000 depended on me both participating in the temptations AND losing weight, it'd be tempting for me (with no eating disorder history) to throw up whatever oreos I ate. I mean, that is a LOT of motivation to lose, healthy or unhealthy.

L144S
01-02-2008, 07:13 PM
Here is a one-day sample menu from Biggest Loser (Prevention website):

http://www.prevention.com/cda/article/biggest-loser-diet/0c31385a75ed5110VgnVCM10000013281eac____/weight.loss/diets/biggest.loser/biggest.loser.diet

You'll see that they measure everything--there is no guessing!--and there are lots of vegetables.

Jay

I see an ad for ALLI right next to the menu!

Heather
01-02-2008, 07:43 PM
I've heard several times on 3fc that the weigh in periods are not a week, but I've been watching recently and they talk about how people were on the campus nearly four months (which sounds right for the number of weeks) and the contestants, trainers, and host often discuss "last week's weigh in" and things like that. That's either a lot of coaching to get it right or a lot of editing...

I'm certainly skeptical of the numbers they pull, but I'm also skeptical of the claim that all the weigh ins are longer than a week (which is what I first heard on 3fc). Now it sounds like people are saying some weigh ins are longer than a week and others shorter? Where is that info from?

mandalinn82
01-02-2008, 07:54 PM
From the show's nutritionist, Dr. Jen's, blog on NBC.com:

Last week, a viewer asked a question about the huge numbers that are sometimes posted on the Biggest Loser scale, and suggested that it is physically impossible to drop that much weight in one week (using the example of Jerry’s 31-pound weight loss at the end of week 1). This is both true and false. The numbers you see on the Biggest Loser scale are very real (I was there for the weigh-in and checked the accuracy of the scale!) -- but there are a few things to keep in mind. The scale reflects weight lost both as fat burned through exercise and dieting, AND as water weight lost. Fluid shifts can be immense, especially during the first weeks of a new lifestyle program, and this fluid loss explains part of the huge numbers seen. Also, a little behind-the-scenes secret: occasionally the production schedule of the show requires that a weigh-in is filmed actually 9 or even 10 days after the last one. This only happened a few times during filming, but can obviously give the contestants a few extra days of weight loss -- and the first weigh-in was one of these weeks. So no, Jerry did not burn off 31 pounds of fat in 7 days. A more realistic number for the typical viewer at home (if you cut your caloric intake by about 500 calories a day and exercise vigorously for about an hour a day) 1% of your body weight per week -- that would be about 1.5 pounds for a 150-pound person, 2 pounds for a 200-pound person, or 3 pounds for a 300 pound person.

kaplods
01-02-2008, 07:59 PM
I do have a lot of problems with the show, but it doesn't stop me from watching. In some ways I think the ethics are on par (sometimes below) Jerry Springer (which I can't watch, except for five minutes here or there in a "train wreck" kind of way if I'm channel surfing). I find it motivating to see and hear other people's struggles with weight, even when I think they're "doing it wrong." So I watch for very selfish reasons, but I'm not really proud of it. I think there are terrible flaws in the show, that I would love to see corrected (though I think they'd make the show interesting only to people who understood the dynamics of "real" weight loss, mostly those overweight themselves, eliminating 2/3 or more of the audience).


I think it's truly a modern "Gladiator" competition in all the positives and negatives the concept entails. Science Fiction of the 60's and 70's gave us horrific predictions of reality tv, and those predictions haven't been all that far off. We may see someone die on television as a result of these shows, and I'm not sure that it would make the shows any less popular (perhaps the reverse). We're as sadistic a culture as the ancient romans, we just consider ourselves morally superior and "cleaner." We may bathe more often, but the blood lust is still there. These are adults and if they read the releases I'm sure they have to sign (promising not to sue if they are injured or die) they know what they're getting into. Still, if someone does die or is seriously hurt, isn't it at least partially the responsibility of the audience. Without an audience would a single gladiator, Christian or animal died in the colliseum?

The Biggest Loser is not a public service announcement, or a PBS documentary on weight loss. It is profit-motivated entertainment, and truth and reality do not matter, entertainment is the bottom line. From the start, you can see that not all contestants have the same chance to win, the 217 pound woman cannot beat the 430 lb man. Yes, comparing the percentage of excess weight and body composition would be more fair, but I would guess that focus groups and test audiences have shown this not to be as entertaining.

What's insidious about the show is that even when you "know better" it's hard not to get wrapped up in the fictional world in which a 7 lb loss is a failure. We do know that unrealistic media examples do exacerbate eating disorders, and there are children and teens watching these shows who might get warped ideas about dieting and exercise. And on the other hand, there are so few programs that even try to address the issue of weight loss and healthy eating (even if done poorly).

Heather
01-02-2008, 08:01 PM
Thanks, Amanda! Sounds like though, that the overall production schedule was 14 weeks or so... in other words, there may be variations in the number of days, but it's not like they were there for 26 weeks and pretended it was 14...

I enjoy the show but do feel it does a disservice to real world weight loss (and the role of body fat!) for many of the reasons mentioned.

mandalinn82
01-02-2008, 08:04 PM
Right - the production schedule doesn't shift, but if that is the case, then for every 10-day week, they have to cut 3 days from other weeks - so some are longer and some are shorter.

I got a bad taste in my mouth reading about Kai eating nothing but asparagus and sugar free jello for 5 days before the final weigh-in and spending 6 hours in a sauna the night before.

Smiling_Sara
01-02-2008, 08:30 PM
Don't they excersize like 7 hrs a day? or a few times a day for hours at a time? They have personal trainers and show them how to cook. They don't have house chores or work while they are there either. I'd think that has some to do with it.

freiamaya
01-02-2008, 10:18 PM
Check out this link -- Kai from Alaska and TBL Season 3 answers some questions from the point of view of a contestant! Found this through google!
http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.ListAll&friendID=127168868
Also found THIS news article concerning an investigation of TBL:
http://www.mmdnewswire.com/attorney-fitness-professional-with-the-nwsf-investigates-the-biggest-loser-2203.html
Maya
:)

Glory87
01-02-2008, 10:56 PM
I've heard several times on 3fc that the weigh in periods are not a week, but I've been watching recently and they talk about how people were on the campus nearly four months (which sounds right for the number of weeks) and the contestants, trainers, and host often discuss "last week's weigh in" and things like that. That's either a lot of coaching to get it right or a lot of editing...

I'm certainly skeptical of the numbers they pull, but I'm also skeptical of the claim that all the weigh ins are longer than a week (which is what I first heard on 3fc). Now it sounds like people are saying some weigh ins are longer than a week and others shorter? Where is that info from?

Reality TV isn't very real at all and I don't believe ANYTHING said on camera. Look at The Amazing Race - the racers very clearly ask for 2 airline tickets, every time they buy tickets. They really get 4 every time (one for each racer and 2 for each production person traveling with them). That's about as believable as "last week's weigh-in!"

Altari
01-02-2008, 11:26 PM
I didn't know it wasn't really a week. I always figured if I had someone(s) hounding me over every calorie I ate, and exercised for 5 hours per day, I'd lose that much.

The people on Fat March lost a decent amount - no Biggest Loser numbers, but still a more-than-average number.

The only reality TV I really like is Survivor Man. The guy goes out all my himself, lol. He'll set up his camera, walk a mile to get a dramatic shot, then walk back to get his gear!

poohshunny
01-02-2008, 11:27 PM
My concern is that folks will try to go from a sedentary lifestyle to total overexertion. I think the show portrays pushing oneself to excessive limits. Exercise is important but definitely needs to be something that one builds on, not suddenly going from nothing to hours of exercise. I cannot imagine the stress it places on the body and I fear someone with heart or blood sugar problems could seriously endanger their health as a result. Last night's show could have made a point with the guy who had to go to the hospital but I think most folks missed it with all the focus on the exercise and competition.

Altari
01-02-2008, 11:33 PM
Good point poohs. It's also not just the stress of jumping in, but couple that with doing it WRONG. These people are CONSTANTLY monitored by a team of medical professionals, their trainers, even lawyers. They probably also have EMTs on staff. Someone starting out at home could push their limits and either a) overdue it into a heart attack or b) do the exercise wrong a tear a ligament.

EZMONEY
01-03-2008, 12:14 AM
My personal take on the whole thing is this ~ I think Reality TV has been around long enough now that most people realize it IS NOT REAL. I think most people realize the truth is "embellished".

I do think, however, that The Biggest Loser does a "fair" job in telling viewers that losing weight needs to be done with a healthy diet and exercise.

As much as can be done so that we will watch.

kaplods
01-03-2008, 12:24 AM
From Kai's blog that Maya posted, it seems that the contestants may not be getting the supervision that is implied or even directly reported by the show. That is disturbing, because I think we have all assumed that the contestants are being closely monitored, supported, and taught "healthy" weight loss, even if they are "unofficially" encouraged to do whatever it takes to win. It looks like this might be a great big load of crap. If as Kai stated, the nondisclosure agreement for the contestants is expiring, we may hear more "horror stories" from prior contestants.

This is what worried me in the beginning, that the releases, nondisclosure agreements and contestant contracts might be written in a way that protects the show, but not the contestants. If contestants have signed away all of their rights, the show has no obligation to protect the contestants from illness or death. In fact, illness, injuries, and even death might make for good ratings. Ambulances may be "standing by," but it's for the drama of the show not the health of the contestants.

I'm not saying that the show producers or the trainers or the on-staff doctors are intentionally wishing harm to the contestants, but they may not be taking the health of the contestants as seriously as they would if they were not protected from lawsuits by the documents the contestants signed.

Altari
01-03-2008, 12:33 AM
It doesn't matter WHAT legal agreement they come up with. If someone has a heart attack on their set, they'll get sued big time. Gross negligence is never covered, by any contract.

baffled111
01-03-2008, 12:46 AM
I'll grant all of you all of your critiques of the Biggest Loser--all excellent points, observations and concerns. But, I watched the first season of the Biggest Loser and it inspired me to haul my @ss off the sofa, put down the cookies, start counting calories, start exercising and to change my life. I watched it and thought, ****, if they can do it, so can I. I haven't watched another season after the first, but I have fond feelings for the program.

That said, I'm not an idiot so I did my own research and developed my own plan and came up with my own exercise program. But the show really did provide the impetus for me to DECIDE to lose weight. And I think the decision is the hardest and most important part. :)

mandalinn82
01-03-2008, 12:49 AM
I should say that, while I realize it isn't real, I still do all of the following every season:

a. Watch
b. Get horribly attached to people on the show
c. Cry like a baby.

kaplods
01-03-2008, 01:39 AM
They might get sued, but in most states it would be extremely unlikely they would be successfully sued as long as the show made the risks clear, and stressed that participation was voluntary. In this country, adults do have a right to do idiotic things, and in many cases it is not illegal to capitalize on on someone else's stupidity. In most states I believe it's still legal to watch someone commit suicide (as long as you don't assist in any way) without being obligated to prevent it. You could videotape someone committing suicide (as long as they knew you were doing so), and you could then sell the video, and in many states doing so would be perfectly legal.

Reading Kai's blog, it does appear that there was not the supervision that the show implies. Maybe they are opening themselves up for a lawsuit, maybe they've already calculated in the cost of lawsuits (it's been known to happen). Maybe Kai is exaggerating for personal reasons, but if as she states in her blog that the nondisclosure agreement has ended, we may be hearing alot more "behind the scenes" stories.

jillybean720
01-03-2008, 08:39 AM
From the quote Amanda posted, it still sounds to me like most of the weigh-ins are a week apart. The writer said it only happened occasionally that it went longer than 7 days ("...This only happened a few times during filming..."). In the end, it's still an average of 1 week per weigh-in (assuming they even cut the next weigh-in period short to make up for the extended one--maybe they just build in an extra week or so to allow for the periods that go longer?).

I agree a million and ten percent that it is unfair to compare men's and women's weight loss (or percentage of weight loss). A guy starting at over 400 pounds can easily be healthy at less than half of his starting weight, but a woman starting at, say, 250 would be hard-pressed to be healthy at only 125, especially with the amount of muscle they are building (unless she's about 4' 10 ;) ). A man has won every season so far, and until they separate the men and women (or somehow kick off all the men so ONLY women are left in the finals), a man always will.

Pita09
01-03-2008, 09:23 AM
Here is a one-day sample menu from Biggest Loser (Prevention website):

http://www.prevention.com/cda/article/biggest-loser-diet/0c31385a75ed5110VgnVCM10000013281eac____/weight.loss/diets/biggest.loser/biggest.loser.diet

You'll see that they measure everything--there is no guessing!--and there are lots of vegetables.

Jay

That diet is just like the Flat Belly Diet that I saw on the Today Show with Liz Vaccariello who is Editor-in-Chief of Prevention magazine. Both sound like good ways to eat.

http://www.prevention.com/cda/article/meet-the-5-flat-belly-foods/bea4682e373c6110VgnVCM10000013281eac____/weight.loss/flat.belly.diet/flat.belly.diet!.food

GatorgalstuckinGA
01-03-2008, 10:13 AM
mandallin - glad to know that i'm not the only "crybaby" (and i don't mean this in a bad way)...i bawl all the time at emotional things...oh well there's always got to be some people who are emotional (and not in a bad way)...heck there's been some kodak commercials that make me tear up LOL

missingmyerica
01-03-2008, 10:27 AM
This show is definitely not perfect, but I think a lot of people are watching and more shows like this will be popping up. We are the fattest nation and if this brings publicity to that fact and people start waking up....I'm all for it. I know it motivates me! I do wonder at the fact that someone hasn't had a heart attack yet, during the beginning stages. It just seems so extreme.

JayEll
01-03-2008, 11:53 AM
Keep in mind that they probably also take "artistic license" with the exercise shots... In other words, they show the people at the height of a strenuous workout. For all we know they are being coached to grimace! I'm not saying they aren't working hard, but I do think that they are not constantly over the top as it is portrayed on the show.

Jay

freiamaya
01-03-2008, 12:02 PM
I think the show is what it is -- entertainment and reality tv. I'm a bit tired of the constant Jillian shots ("make her CRY" "GET UP OFF THE FLOOR -- NOW" "FASTER") that are clearly there to add to the drama. It also seems that the amount of weight lost weekly is getting bigger and bigger and BIGGER each season. I remember in season 1, it was 3-5 lbs/week. Now it seems that anything less than double digits is considered as "failure". I am also getting a bit tired of the product placement segments -- "diet jello!" "sugar-free gum!" and my FAVORITE "Brita water filters give you cleaner TASTING water" whilst filling up their nalgene bottles (just removed from the market in one of our major Canadian sports retailers due to health concerns re: plastic leeching into the water).
BUT, it IS entertaining, so really, at the end of the day, what the heck do I know????
Maya
:)

misschris531
01-03-2008, 12:36 PM
Unfortunately, that constant product placement is commonplace in almost all television & movies today!

nylisa
01-03-2008, 12:41 PM
The reasons Mandalinn lists are why I prefer VH1's Celebrity Fit Club. It's more "realistic" in that the contestants go back to their everyday life in between weigh ins. Though some have resorted to unhealthy behavior to lose weight. Also, I like the fact that they don't vote anyone off the show (but they have each team pick a member to switch with the other team). So you can see everyone's progress week to week. They have a psychologist as well as a nutritionist and trainer to address the psychological reasons people overeat. What's interesting about these shows is they don't address (or at least when I've watched) the monthly fluctuations in women's weight. I think that should be addressed. And they should include inches lost, bp/cholesterol for all contestants, not just the most obese.

mandalinn82
01-03-2008, 01:46 PM
I'm more OK with the Brita product placement than the 100 cal packs. You know that Bob and Jillian don't really encourage people to eat what is essentially portion controlled junk food.

jillybean720
01-03-2008, 02:20 PM
I'm more OK with the Brita product placement than the 100 cal packs. You know that Bob and Jillian don't really encourage people to eat what is essentially portion controlled junk food.
I agree--the Brita is also to promote a healthy environment (use 1 Brita filter a month rather than 20 little plastic bottles every day). Those 100-calorie snack packs really get on my nerves. I know they help a lot of people, but when the trainers and nutritionists are trying to promote a healthy, whole food diet plan, it's clear that they are only there for the endorsements.

freiamaya
01-03-2008, 03:27 PM
I get the idea of product placement, and that it is everywheres. But what drives me NUTS is the almost PLANNED commericial within the show. You know, where they round everyone up and a trainer says something like "OK, we're going to learn how to eat properly. Here is a 100 calorie snack pack of X. Eat them." IF the products were prominently displayed it would irk me less. But the actual ad drives me nuts. (I know American Idol does this too, with fake "talk sessions" based around junk food products -- drives me nutso, too!).
And I know that Brita water filters are basically carbon filters that mount onto your taps. In studies, the actual amount of impurities removed by Brita in real-life situations is overestimated by the company by around 50% (i.e. half as effective as claimed), for a variety of reasons (length of time in contact with the water, short lifespan of the filter, etc...).
http://www.mikexstudios.com/archives/2006/12/06/analyzing-the-effectiveness-of-brita%C2%AE-water-filters/
http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/consumers/bottled-water.html
Which is why they say "cleaner TASTING water" and not "cleaner, purer water". Marketing. Drives me nuts!!!!
Maya
:)
ps. be sure to check the source of your bottled water, too: Dasani is filtered municipal tap water from Brampton and Calgary city sources here in Canada: Aquafina is also filtered municipal tap water.

rockinrobin
01-03-2008, 03:37 PM
The show is definitely over the top and totally unrealistic. I mean, not too many people are whisked away, taken to a retreat, made to exercise 24/7, have a great loaded kitchen at their disposal, taken away from their jobs and able to concentrate on weight loss and weight loss alone - oh yeah and have a HUGE monetary reward dangled in front of them - but nevertheless, I do find it motivating, inspirational and VERY emotional. What can I say? I'm a sap for anything to do with weight loss.

Janie Canuck
01-03-2008, 04:02 PM
I've started watching very recently. It's kind of a "guilty pleasure" I guess. Even knowing that it's not "real life", it is pretty inspring, to see people lose all that weight. It's like watching an over-the-top romance movie - there's no harm in finding it entertaining, as long as you can separate the movie from what you can reasonably expect in your own life!

misschris531
01-03-2008, 04:05 PM
Well said, Janie Canuck!

practiceliving
01-03-2008, 04:17 PM
I should say that, while I realize it isn't real, I still do all of the following every season:

a. Watch
b. Get horribly attached to people on the show
c. Cry like a baby.

This pretty much summed it up for me, too. It's not realistic at ALL, so the strategies they use aren't the strategies I use. It's still fun to follow, and the emotional aspects of it are really valuable to me.

Altari
01-03-2008, 04:49 PM
why I prefer VH1's Celebrity Fit Club...
The only thing that gets me with that show is they talk about how different bone structures are a myth. They might not be as wide spread as some overweight people like to say, but if you put me at my thinnest (155) next to my girlfriend at her thinnest (115) you'll see a difference in our builds. I was a size 10, she was a size 6. Fit Club puts too much emphasis on BMI, IMO.