Food Talk And Fabulous Finds - Glad microwave steaming bags




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cbmare
11-26-2007, 03:38 PM
I received a box of these things over the weekend. I'm supposed to product test them and report how I did.

I put 2 cups of my favorite frozen veggie mix in one today. I must say, it steamed them nicely. They were not mushy. I didn't have to use water.

So far, I'm pleased. I think I'll try a turkey and veggie omelet in one tomorrow.

Have you tried them?


Puncezilla
11-26-2007, 04:15 PM
I haven't tied them and don't want to.. I've read and heard so many things about how unhealthy it is to put plastic containers or wrap in the microwave (chemicals leach from the plastic/wrap when heated) So I never put anything plastic in the microwave.

ggmugsy
11-26-2007, 04:31 PM
I'm with Puncezilla. The ease of preparation isn't worth the possible cancer risks.


cbmare
11-26-2007, 04:47 PM
These bags are not PVCs. Those are the problem bags and plastics. These bags are engineered differently so that nothing leaches out. Because they don't contain PVCs they are not recycleable. That is a problem for me but I promised them I'd try them out.

Brendansmum
11-26-2007, 05:11 PM
I agree with the other two posters. I saw a commercial for these and this was the first thing that came to mind. I've gotten rid of all my plastic storage containers and use only glass. I got a steamer at the goodwill a while back and use it all the time. The little bags would be easier and they are good for a quick clean up but will we find out later down the road they are not good for you?? Just like everything else it seems.

BlueToBlue
11-26-2007, 05:40 PM
It's not just the cancer risk for me but also that using plastic bags is really bad for the environment. Our goal is to have zero garbage in our household (we recycle everything that we can--plastics rated 1 through 7, aluminum and cans, milk cartons, styrofoam--and we put food scraps and food-soiled paper in the green can). At this point, non-recycleble plastic bags and kleenex are just about the only thing we through in the trash, so I'm really trying to use more reusable containers (tupperware, etc.) and fewer plastic bags. I would think that you could get glass or plastic tupperware that steams just as well as the plastic bags and since you'd be washing and reusing it, it would be better for the environment.

cbmare
11-26-2007, 05:42 PM
Like I said, the fact that it is not recycleable is an issue for me. However, I was selected to try them out and give some feedback.

That will be one of my comments.

We recycle, too. In fact, you've given me an idea for a thread in General Chatter.

Scenestealer
11-27-2007, 11:31 AM
I steam my frozen veggies by tossing them in a bowl filled about halfway up the veggies with water. Pop them in for 2 minutes or so, then just pour the excess water off. It's not quite steaming, but it's still perfectly healthy and avoids the plastics problem.

cbmare
11-27-2007, 12:51 PM
Well, I've tried them a couple of times. I have to say that I do like them. However, the fact that they can't be recycled just irritates me.

I have to give a product feedback to these people. I will tell them that using them is super easy. However, since they can't be recycled, they won't be used anymore in our home.

kaplods
11-27-2007, 01:08 PM
I saw the steaming bags at Sam's club and on T, and I was a little irritated that some of the marketing implies that the bags are the only way to steam vegetables in the microwave without an expensive microwave steamer. Any old glass bowel and a damp paper towel is all I've ever needed.

cbmare
11-27-2007, 04:51 PM
I saw the steaming bags at Sam's club and on T, and I was a little irritated that some of the marketing implies that the bags are the only way to steam vegetables in the microwave without an expensive microwave steamer. Any old glass bowel and a damp paper towel is all I've ever needed.


Any old glass what? I'm not cooking in one of those.

Sorry, I know what you meant. I couldn't help myself.

mandalinn82
11-27-2007, 04:56 PM
Mare, I thought it too :wink:

kaplods
11-27-2007, 06:22 PM
Oops! What's really funny is my original spelling was glass bowel and paper towl (guess the spellings got crossed in my head). I caught towl and corrected it, but missed the other. Yes, I of course meant bowl (where would you even get a glass bowel, and how would you use it?"

ennay
11-27-2007, 07:40 PM
My dad always said he had a "delicate bowel" maybe its the same thing?

Our friends brought them over for T-day...I had asked them to prepare a veggie dish DOH - dont ask the people who dont eat veggies to prepare veggies. :dizzy:

Anyway, I was shocked at how little the bags hold. A full bag would have been maybe enough for me.

Didnt notice that the stuff was any better then the ..ahem.. "bowel method" :lol: and definitely too mushy for my taste, I prefer a quick stirfry and eat them crispy.

It does appear to be the same plastic that the sterilization bags for breast pumps are made of but thinner. Those I did use, 20 uses per bag.

LLV
11-30-2007, 07:03 PM
I've tried them. They're okay, I guess. I tried steaming fish and put the fish in the nuker for the recommended time and my fish was literally petrified. I could have saved it for a fossil collection.

Haven't tried veggies yet, though. I'm almost afraid to. I'll probably kill those too.

sportmom
11-30-2007, 09:18 PM
I used them and they were good, either plain, or with a squirt of butter spray.

Intrigued to know more about plastics. I know you shouldn't microwave in styrofoam, but is it all plastics, or certain kinds? I have the little baby gerber bowls that I cook stuff in for my kids - they are not recyclable, so are those bad too? Should we not m'wave in tupperware or those glad containers? What's bad plastic and what isn't for microwaving? I learned a new trick about steaming in a glass bowl. I guess I've been living under a rock (or the golden arches!!)

LLV
12-05-2007, 09:39 AM
I used them and they were good, either plain, or with a squirt of butter spray.

Intrigued to know more about plastics. I know you shouldn't microwave in styrofoam, but is it all plastics, or certain kinds? I have the little baby gerber bowls that I cook stuff in for my kids - they are not recyclable, so are those bad too? Should we not m'wave in tupperware or those glad containers? What's bad plastic and what isn't for microwaving? I learned a new trick about steaming in a glass bowl. I guess I've been living under a rock (or the golden arches!!)

I dunno, I've been microwaving with plastic for years and I'm still alive, so...

If one thing don't kill me, something else will. I know that's not a very positive attitude on this subject, but really, I have no idea what plastics are "good" and which are "bad" and which ones will send me to an early grave.

:rolleyes: :dz:

ggmugsy
12-05-2007, 03:37 PM
It's been proven that all plastics degrade over time when exposed to heat. That includes dishwashers and microwaves.

It's also been proven that certain plastics, when exposed to heat, become estrogen reactive and cause breast cancer. Unfortunately, plastic manufacturers are not required to label WHICH plastics become estrogen reactive.

I'm in the process of getting rid of ALL the plastics in my kitchen simply because I do wash them over and over again. I just don't want to take any chances. I'll store everything in glass from now on.

Scenestealer
12-06-2007, 12:34 PM
I avoid the problem by not heating anything in plastic. I do have Tupperware and use it frequently, but once I take it out of the fridge I always put it into something glass before heating it.

Yes, I know there are a million other things that might kill me, but it's not hard to switch to glass, and it's a little step to just be one little thing that won't hurt me. If I take enough little steps, I'll be healthier. And isn't that the motto of most people losing weight? Sure, one serving of potato chips isn't a big deal, but combine that with one serving of ice cream, one serving of cake, one serving of cookies...

cbmare
12-06-2007, 01:15 PM
I sent my evaluation back to them. I stated what all of the concerns here were. Their website says that this is a newer plastic that was approved by the government and that it doesn't degrade with heat. Since it is new, how do they know?

I remarked that a big concern here was that the pastic can't be recycled.

I was finishing my report and answering the questions when boobalah noticed that it was made in China. I went back to the comments section and requested that they start making it in America. I remarked that I realize that the labor costs are much cheaper in China, but in light of all the scares we've had for over a years now, starting with the pet food a year ago, that they should consider taking their manufacturing out of China.

Thanks for all your input. I did take the comments to heart and include them in my evaluation.