100 lb. Club - Since when is this an appropriate word?




CLCSC145
10-10-2007, 08:22 PM
For the THIRD time in the last week I've read the word "FATTIES" in a mainstream media article. I find it so offensive. If a person is fat, call them fat, obese, etc., but fatties?! Funny how when the political correctness police could actually do some good, they are nowhere to be found.

I get so tired of fat bashing being so socially acceptable. Is it just me being sensitive or does it feel to anyone else like it's getting more prevalent?


mandalinn82
10-10-2007, 08:24 PM
Can you link to the articles? I don't think I've ever seen it except in fiction pieces or opinion pieces written by people who are purposefully offensive...but wow, how annoying and offensive to have it in a mainstream media article!

Were they quoting people or did the author say something like "The study showed that the fatties consumed more beef than the non-fatties"?

Robin41
10-10-2007, 08:28 PM
Fatties has a really patronizing tone that I don't like. Personally, I prefer lardass.


walking2lose
10-10-2007, 09:05 PM
Robin - you are too funny.

Seriously, I do have the same question as Amanda

Prissiroo
10-10-2007, 09:52 PM
I find it offensive too! But - I grew up being called all sorts of names from a jerk brother (who just last week at 45 called me a fat pig...pffftt)...but, what do you do?

CLCSC145
10-10-2007, 10:04 PM
Mandalinn, Maybe I'm using mainstream incorrectly? I meant published articles (including opinion articles or entertainment-type articles where the author is trying to be humorous) from non-obscure sources. But I think even if it is opinion or humor, being published by such sources just puts it out there that it's an appropriate word.

The one from today was on cnn.com. The headline was "Four Fab Fatties Make it Big on Record Chart". After the link, they tell you that the musical group describes themselves using the word - which brings up a whole different issue - but cnn was clearly using it to grab attention, and a reader who maybe doesn't follow the link just sees the word used in print.

One was on MSNBC.com and was used in the title (No Fatties Here): http://yourbiz.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2007/09/10/351401.aspx

I couldn't remember where the other one was, so I did a search for articles with the word "fatties" in them and got 5 pages of them. Here are just a few:

http://www.suntimes.com/news/steinberg/557321,CST-NWS-stein14.article Just as reduced driving improves the environment by cutting back on the pollution that warms the atmosphere and has deleterious effects on health, so more restrained eating should keep the food bill in check and cut back on the growing number of fatties.

http://www.nydailynews.com/lifestyle/2007/09/26/2007-09-26_whether_its_a_new_career_or_look_makeove.html Leaves aren't the only things going through colorful changes these days. There's a new syndrome in town: Call it Makeover Madness! The signs are everywhere. Legal eagle Marcia Clark's gone blond. Former fatties Valerie Bertinelli and Kirstie Alley are approaching skinny-mini status.

http://www.thewavemag.com/pagegen.php?pagename=article&articleid=26401 Regarding the new TV show Big Band Theory: Now that nerds are the world’s largest minority (behind fatties), more shows are being created for and about them.

http://www.salon.com/mwt/broadsheet/2007/09/20/french_fat/index.html?source=rss As has been well documented in Asian countries whose populations grow in girth as they adopt more Western diets and lifestyles, the swelling number of French fatties proves that fat isn't an American monopoly so much as a successful cultural export.

In all cases, I think it was either meant to be inflammatory or funny. I just don't care for it...

kaplods
10-10-2007, 10:14 PM
We've come to accept informality everywhere. Calling strangers by their first name, corporate casual and even jeans and tennis shoes in workplaces that in the past would have required dress clothes or a uniform, accepting slang and idioms even in news media. In that regard, I don't think it's a lot different. Though I agree it's offensive because the "ie" ending makes a term "cute" w, and therefore condescending. Remember when "Trekkies" fought for the term "Trekkers."

Daimere
10-10-2007, 10:26 PM
I find it offensive too. I think they need to stick to just fat or obese.

Although, you could call me a hypocrite because I typically hang on another internet forum where they religiously say, "NO FATTIES HERE." Then again, that forum is always rude and crude. Lol

Lovely
10-10-2007, 10:35 PM
Remember when "Trekkies" fought for the term "Trekkers."

LOL Us real Star Trek lovers don't care what the outsiders use to categorize. We just know they're great shows ;)

LaurieDawn
10-10-2007, 11:09 PM
Fatties has a really patronizing tone that I don't like. Personally, I prefer lardass.

I LOVE your sense of humor!!!!

xJox
10-11-2007, 12:02 AM
Oh I heard that word on utube it was a television interview with Jillian I believe.

Cassie501107
10-11-2007, 12:43 AM
I can handle "fatties" better than the word "Morbidly" when referring to obesity...gruesome? Grisly? Really? Ouch.

CLCSC145
10-11-2007, 12:50 AM
I can handle "morbidly" since by definition it means "caused by or altered by or manifesting disease or pathology". So I welcome clinical terms, it's the belittling words I dislike!

I thought some more about it and I think the real issue for me is that it brings to mind the taunting song I learned in grammar school... "Fatty, fatty two by four, can't fit through the kitchen door".

KforKitty
10-11-2007, 07:02 AM
I get so tired of fat bashing being so socially acceptable. Is it just me being sensitive or does it feel to anyone else like it's getting more prevalent?

This too is one of my bugbears and I don't think I'm being oversensitive. Being 'fatist' seems to be the last socially acceptable way to ridicule those who are differrent from the norm. The media is currently on the back of every story involving diet and nutrition and lays the ills of the country on the shoulders of the overweight. A recent article suggested that overweight women should not be having babies, unless they lose weight, as being pregnant and overweight strained medical resources.

I worry for my daughter (8) who is carrying a little more weight than her classmates. The government here (UK) were on about sending healthcare people into schools to record the weight of children with the parents of those identified as overweight being given advice about diet and exercise (and the children stigmatised at the same time). I would be horrified if I was labled in this way and assumptions made that I am too ignorant to know about proper nutrition. Anyhow starting to rant now, so I'll finish there.

And being called 'fatties' is a derogatory term in my book.

Kitty

slimmingsi
10-11-2007, 07:10 AM
Do forgive me for not actually giving a S**t but its only a word! Political correctness is my biggest bugbear ever, remember the old rhyme sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me!

i once got called fat by a girl in a bar, standard response.
"i can lose the weight love but your stuck with your face!"

GirlyGirlSebas
10-11-2007, 08:21 AM
Fatties has a really patronizing tone that I don't like. Personally, I prefer lardass.

:rofl:....Robin, you're making me choke on my coffee!

Personally, I'm not bothered by the word. But, now that I know it offends, I'll be sure not to use it.

JayEll
10-11-2007, 08:36 AM
Is fattie more derogatory than skinny?

Is fattie more derogatory than nerd?

If a group describes themselves as fatties, should we make them stop?

People tend to use these terms when talking about "those other people" it seems.

Jay

Lovely
10-11-2007, 09:34 AM
I have to point out that fat would be the comparable word with skinny. (She's a fattie vs. She's a skinny person.)

The problem with "fattie" is that it implies a lot about the person themselves without being objective. Fat, skinny, tall, short are supposed to be somewhat objective descriptive words. Fattie feels to me as though it includes some judgement along with it. Fattie is... for lack of a better word belittling. And while sure it's gonna be used in jokes and **** some of them are really funny, I do not feel as though it should be used to describe people in a news publication.

synger
10-12-2007, 12:34 PM
I was actually more concerned by the one article that was linked that discussed making insurance premiums higher for those with a high BMI. Now THAT worries me.

JayEll
10-12-2007, 12:48 PM
I already pay higher premiums because of my "build." :( I'm hoping that in a year when I've maintained a normal weight I can get a reduction.

But it makes sense.

Jay

Shy Moment
10-12-2007, 12:50 PM
slimmingsi
I agree. Since when did everyone get so thin skinned. I am fat, if I don't want people to know, I should lose weight. I dont think being called fat is any worse than being called Skinny, Blondie, Shortie or any other word. It can depend on how the word is used if it is meant to describe or hurt. I am NOT short I am vertically challenged. Short is short no matter the word lol.

phantastica
10-12-2007, 01:16 PM
I've seen this in articles before, too. It seems like the use of the term "fatty" is more common in the UK and Australia than in the US.

I don't have any problem with saying to someone "I am fat" and talking freely about being fat, but there is something demeaning about calling someone "a fatty". Are drug addicts offended by the term "druggie"? Maybe or maybe not, but it would make me uncomfortable to think that my one habit is so encompassing of my behavior that I can be characterized by it.

The irony about fat hatred in America is that our food culture (media) totally promotes all these unhealthy processed foods, yet when we behave as dutiful consumers and buy and consume them, we're called "fatties".

CLCSC145
10-12-2007, 02:30 PM
slimmingsi
I agree. Since when did everyone get so thin skinned. I am fat, if I don't want people to know, I should lose weight. I dont think being called fat is any worse than being called Skinny, Blondie, Shortie or any other word. It can depend on how the word is used if it is meant to describe or hurt. I am NOT short I am vertically challenged. Short is short no matter the word lol.

FYI, I mentioned in my post that I don't care if someone calls me fat. I am. It's the "fatty" term I didn't care for. I'm not generally someone who buys into a lot of the political correctness stuff (it often goes way too far), this one just hits me wrong. And while I may not like hearing a random person use the slang in conversation, I can take it. It's knowing an editor thought that term was acceptable in their publication that bugs me.

slimmingsi
10-12-2007, 02:39 PM
i think that being thin skinned is a product of modern culture its never your fault its someone elses.

To reply to a previous comment about fat bashing being socially acceptable i think in part its because unlike racism, fatism attacks something that the majority of us can control or work against. if your overweight lose it, granted there is a minority and i mean tiny minority of people who have medical conditions making it really really hard to lose weight but its not impossible, your race is your race and you can't do anything about it.

With regards to insurance i believe people who have a high BMI i.e over 30 should pay higher premiums, along with people who drink lots and people who smoke. being overweight strains the body, it stresses the heart and lungs it increases your risk of stroke and diabeties, thats why we are all here after all isn't it? to lose the weight to be healthy and in most cases to see our kids grow up and see grand kids?

Lovely
10-12-2007, 03:28 PM
if your overweight lose it, granted there is a minority and i mean tiny minority of people who have medical conditions making it really really hard to lose weight but its not impossible, your race is your race and you can't do anything about it.



I do not think that it is OK to tell someone who is heavier that they have to lose weight because it's something they can usually control.

It's a slippery slope when we say it's alright to belittle those who are different when they have the option to be the same.

We're all here because we have made the decision to change our lives in ways that we feel will make us feel better & healthier, but even when I'm at my ultimate weight I will never tell another human being that they should do as I have done. I don't feel I have the right to judge someone by one thing that they do, unhealthy or not, and tell them to change.

slimmingsi
10-12-2007, 03:41 PM
i never told anyone to lose it, if you take the comment within the context of the paragraph it shows the apparent social views of people on those with weight issues. i.e we are looked upon differently and it is acceptable to belittle us because we can change what is in the social sense wrong with us. the apparent social view of obesity.

As opposed to racism with is rightly social unacceptable, because that person has not control over the issue with which you are attacking/belittling them for.

from what i've seen and heard from alot of openly fattist people is that they see fat people as a stereotype and nothing more, as we know that stereotype is usually very wrong but to the majority its what they believe, i.e fat people only eat junk food. so they see fatness as a self inflicted condition that deserves no sympathy.

is it just me seeing and hearing this point of view or am i in a particularly bad neighbourhood?

Lovely
10-12-2007, 04:02 PM
i never told anyone to lose it, if you take the comment within the context of the paragraph it shows the apparent social views of people on those with weight issues. i.e we are looked upon differently and it is acceptable to belittle us because we can change what is in the social sense wrong with us. the apparent social view of obesity.

As opposed to racism with is rightly social unacceptable, because that person has not control over the issue with which you are attacking/belittling them for.

from what i've seen and heard from alot of openly fattist people is that they see fat people as a stereotype and nothing more, as we know that stereotype is usually very wrong but to the majority its what they believe, i.e fat people only eat junk food. so they see fatness as a self inflicted condition that deserves no sympathy.

is it just me seeing and hearing this point of view or am i in a particularly bad neighbourhood?

Firstly, my apologies. I read through your comment several times, but thought from the sentence that it was you who was saying "if you're overweight lose it". So again, sorry for the misunderstanding.

Secondly, you are absolutely not alone in that. It's all over the place. Granted, I'm sure it's worse in some areas than others.

I'm not trying to take a "poor me" approach either. But sometimes the stereotyping is so thick I start to believe it about myself.


Edit: "so they see fatness as a self inflicted condition that deserves no sympathy."

I had to add: I'm not so sure that I want sympathy. Simple indifference would make me happy! lol

kaplods
10-12-2007, 04:43 PM
I find it interesting that so often people acknolwedge that "some" people may have "legitimate" factors that make weight loss impossible or nearly so, but that "most" people have only themselves to blame (the "they could change if they really wanted to" argument). Not only making this argument, they use it as a justification in discriminatatory and offensive practices.

The problem I see with this argument is that while it may be true (at this point it's very difficult to prove or disprove), you can't identify which people can be legitimately "blamed," just by looking at them. The dieting statistics are dismal, so maybe more people than we think "can't help it," or maybe there are factors we don't fully understand yet, or maybe we're all just the lazy idiots and incompetents that we're judged to be. I tend not to think so.

Words and labels do matter, and they mean something. I think "fattie" does share some traits with other "ie" terms such as "darkie," and "druggie" and "girlie," and even "doggie" and "Billie" and "Susie." The "ie" or "y" ending in English is generally used as a diminutive, much as the "en" and "el" in german. It makes a word less threatening, more "cute" and also less worthy of respect.

How much "weight" do we ascribe to it? That's harder to say. When do we take offense, and when are we overreacting? Sometimes it's a fine line.

Cuter w Curves
10-12-2007, 04:53 PM
I find it offensive too! But - I grew up being called all sorts of names from a jerk brother (who just last week at 45 called me a fat pig...pffftt)...but, what do you do?

Ya know... If my brother ever did that I would find a way to get my hands on a REALLY big can of beans, wait a bit... Then sit on him and make him pay.

But hey! I just wouldn't tolerate that really.


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As for the term "fatties"... I find it disgusting.

Jen415
10-13-2007, 10:02 AM
Ya know... If my brother ever did that I would find a way to get my hands on a REALLY big can of beans, wait a bit... Then sit on him and make him pay.



LOL! Good thing I was drinking water, since a whole mouthful was spewed on my screen!

Marseille
10-13-2007, 12:31 PM
I don't give a toss what the call me. I am just trying to get myself out of this situation so that when the word "fatty" is thrown around, it isn't being thrown at me.

About the insurance bit... I absolutely 100% believe that overweight people should have to pay a higher insurance premium. Smokers do, and it gets reduced if they quit smoking. A person of my size who is a walking time bomb and a diabetic seizure, heart attack, or broken ankle waiting to happen shouldn't get to enjoy the same low premium as someone who has taken better care of their body.

Cuter w Curves
10-14-2007, 11:26 AM
LOL! Good thing I was drinking water, since a whole mouthful was spewed on my screen!

hehehe

Was wondering when that would happen to someone. :hug: