Nutrition and Labeling - the pros and cons of eating corn




View Full Version : the pros and cons of eating corn


Cuter w Curves
10-10-2007, 02:22 AM
*chuckle* Tell that to the 45 lbs that went missing after removing it completely.

Corn:

-Starch - not so good for weight loss
-I had 3 nutritionists tell me point blank that any nutritional value that it has is too low to counter balance the starch in it. Truth be told it has a fairly good level of fiber, ad a few vitamins; however, most do not chew it enough to break it down so that these are readily absorbed.
-Corn is the source of High Fructose or Glucose/Fructose which is probably not so great really.

And just some food for thought:

When farmers want to "fatten" up their live stock they feed them corn to increase their fat levels. The growing issue with overweight children wasn't a problem until almost everything contained corn... And I mean everything!

It comes down to this:

We cut out potato for the most part because of the starch levels. Why are so many who've done that still eating corn when there are so many alternatives if they want a vegetable or whole grain that are not starch based?

Did you know that the list of things containing, derived from or possibly containing/derived from corn is massive? If want it then just shoot me a message. It is wild! And I mean really wild!

But really... This should likely be a whole new thread. Specifically the pros and cons of eating corn.


JayEll
10-10-2007, 08:37 AM
Hey! Yeah, corn consumption is definitely something that needs watching. I measure it carefully if I'm having any.

I'd like to add that Triscuits are one of my favorite snacks when I'm wanting something salty. They come in some really good new flavors now, too. Six Triscuits is a serving and has 120 cals., 4 gm fat, 3 gm protein, 19 gm carbs. I sometimes will have three Triscuits with some string cheese or some water-packed tuna and a few green olives.

Sweet snacks--well, I'm not big on those--but I like to have some Ghirardelli 60% cocoa chocolate chips from time to time. Sixteen chips has 80 cals, 6 gm fat, 1 gm protein, 8 gm carbs. A few almonds with them is nice. But, if you are a chocolate addict, this could trigger you, so use with care.

Jay

MugCanDoIt
10-10-2007, 10:36 AM
If I am feeling snack-ish as I call it... I will eat anything without a corn product in it.

1. Allergy
2. Corn is just really bad for you if you are trying to lose weight.

Try some soda crackers and fruit...
A slice of cheese and apple sliced up.
Frozen grapes are good... Crunch with sweet!

Oh and try drinking a glass of water and letting it sit for 10 min first. You won't want or need as much to snack on.

Why is corn bad if you are trying to lose wieight? Do tell. :o


jtammy
10-10-2007, 12:43 PM
I very, very seldom eat corn. I love corn, I could eat it anyway you could prepare it; on the cob, creamed, plain kernels. I've probably enjoyed the thousands of corn derivatives each on their own. ;) I'm sure there are more nutritional benefits to corn than I know about.

BUT, I grew up on a farm; we raised pigs (along with chickens, cows, catfish). When it was getting close to time to take the pigs to the stock yard to sale, we would feed them dried corn. Lots of dried corn. It fattened them up beautifully, so we made more money since you're paid based on the weight of the animal.

The plan that I initially started losing weight on discouraged corn, because it was a lower carb diet plan. Even though I have widened the foods that I eat since the beginning, I still eat it very sparingly. That decision wasn't based on any scientific research though, just my memories of those fat pigs at the corn trough. :)

GirlyGirlSebas
10-10-2007, 12:44 PM
I am insulin resistant and have removed all corn or corn products from my diet...however, corn is not the only food I must avoid. I also must avoid all white pasta, white bread, white rice...etc etc and I limit my fruits. I only eat whole grains and I everything I eat is accompanied with a serving of protein. I've copied a portion of an excellent article on insulin resistance that explains why I avoid corn and refined grains.

"These foods require little digestion and get absorbed all at once and all too rapidly into the bloodstream. This sugary food consumption shocks the body and alarms your whole system. "Get rid of it!! Out rushes the insulin, made by your pancreas for this reason and knocks out every bit of glucose and quickly stores it as fat. (The body does store sugar as gylcogen in the liver and muscles, but there is just so much it can store before it has to store it as fat cells.)

As a result of this the blood sugar level becomes unstable. The blood sugar level drops.

At this point, people tend to reach for more refined carbohydrates, and the cycle continues. The more you eat, the more you sugar in the blood, the more insulin takes it out of the blood and over time, the insulin gets less effective. This is what is known as insulin resistance."

Not only is weight gain a concern with insulin resistance, but this condition can also lead to Type II diabetes. I also read another article not too long ago that indicates that many many overweight people have insulin resistance and aren't even aware of the condition. Also, many women who are in perimenopause or in full menopause develop this condition.

SoulBliss
10-10-2007, 12:51 PM
Corn and soy are in nearly every processed (packaged, prepared) food. There's a great book that looks at corn (I cant recall the name but maybe it will come to me later).

We cut out potato for the most part because of the starch levels. Why are so many who've done that still eating corn when there are so many alternatives if they want a vegetable or whole grain that are not starch based?

While I have not cut out potato (for many reasons), I am with ya on the vegetable part (I have always counted corn and potatoes as "starch" in my mind) but what whole grains aren't starch based?

nelie
10-10-2007, 12:59 PM
I am currently reading "The Omnivore's Dilemma" and it is amazing at how many things contain corn but personally that is really only an issue if you eat a lot of processed foods and eat a lot of standard meat products.

We could dramatically cut down our processed corn consumption by eating whole foods and either cutting back on meat products or eating naturally grown meat products.

I think corn is good but I also think it is something to eat in moderation. I also think potatoes are good but again I think they should be eaten in moderation.

mandalinn82
10-10-2007, 01:00 PM
For me personally, corn itself has no effect on my weight loss. I lost all of my weight making liberal use of some whole-grain corn products, like popcorn or sprouted whole grain corn tortillas.

What I DO avoid, though, by avoiding processed foods, is high fructose corn syrup and corn-based processed food additives. I just focus on eating healthy, all natural foods, which keeps the amount of those additives in my diet almost non-existent. Corn-based food additives ARE in most processed foods, and they are certainly of questionable nutritional value. Since processed foods are stripped of so much nutritious value, I try to avoid them as much as I can whether they contain corn or not, preferring to stick with lean proteins, whole grains, and produce for 90-95% of my diet. I count corn as a grain because it is so starchy, but as long as I'm eating most of my food in pretty much the state it was grown in, I'm happy.

In my personal experience, the occasional starchy vegetable (corn, or yes, white potato if you enjoy it) isn't going to slow your losses unless you eat an out-of-control portion. My own weight loss and 6 months (and counting) of maintaining that loss has happened while eating corn or whole grain corn products like popcorn two to three times a week or more, and white potatoes at least weekly. That might not work for everyone, but it did work really well for me.

Lovely
10-10-2007, 02:45 PM
I realize that many people must avoid certain types of foods due to health reasons. I'm not one of them.

I enjoy corn. It's tasty. Having occasional corn on the cob for dinner, or even a little bit of creamed corn has not hindered my weight loss thus far.

I liken it to potatoes, pasta and heck even chocolate. Eating a little bit every once in a while is not going to hurt me.

I, also, try to avoid foods with high fructose corn syrup, though I don't 100% of the time.

For people in my situation, I believe that the only unhealthy thing they can do is to ignore the fact that corn is a starchy food & consume far too much.

Though it may not be for everyone, I have found that I can have starchy foods (including corn) in moderation & still be sticking with a healthy eating plan.

kaplods
10-10-2007, 04:14 PM
I am also insulin resistant, and limiting starches (including corn) helps me lose weight and avoid cravings.

However, let's keep corn in perspective. Very few people eat "optimally" for each and every meal and snack. And even the least nutritionally valid food can have a place in a healthy diet. An ear of sweet corn is relatively harmless when you compare it to a snicker's bar or even a piece of white bread. But I think we have to remember what it is. It is a grain, not really a vegetable, so it should not replace a vegetable on your plate. Also, since there are a lot of other grains that are more nutritious, even as a grain choice it shouldn't be your first and definitely not your only choice.

Glory87
10-10-2007, 04:54 PM
*chuckle* Tell that to the 45 lbs that went missing after removing it completely.

Nothing wrong with corn - says the chick who lost 70+ lbs without cutting out corn.

I'm not a huge corn eater, I like it and have absolutely no problems with it - I love fresh corn on the cob in the summer (preferably grilled), I like putting baby corn into stir fry, I like making red bean and corn pita pockets. I like sprinkling corn on my BBQ chicken salads. I like making corn/grilled chicken/low fat cream cheese/green chile quesadillas.

I never cut out any food that had a positive nutritional benefit. I do try to eat the healthiest versions available. I eat sweet potatoes (all the time!), winter squashes, brown rice, quinoa, whole wheat couscous, whole wheat pasta, whole grain breads/tortillas/waffles. I am aware of a serving size and measure foods accordingly - 2 oz or 1/2 - 1 cup or 2 waffles or 3 small tortillas works for me.

I am not insulin resistant and have no reason to cut out corn or any of those foods. Eating them didn't stop me from losing 70+ lbs or keeping it off for over 3 years. I did completely give up fast food, most fried foods, packaged baked goods and sugar - foods that truly don't provide any nutritional benefits.

Shy Moment
10-10-2007, 04:59 PM
I love corn on the cob. Take a certain amount of butter and put it on bread then then slide the corn over it. I know how much butter I am using. I don't do without a thing. Isn't something I eat all the time but when I want it I enjoy it. Probably have corn once or twice a month.

anajjana
10-10-2007, 05:08 PM
wow!! I've put on about 7lbs since i started buying mini ears of corn and eating them on a regular basis!!! i was wondering what was going on! thanks for the info! i never even knew!

baffled111
10-10-2007, 09:05 PM
I love corn. When it's fresh and in season and I can buy it at the farmer's market, I eat it on the cob once or twice a week. It has nutritional value, it's tasty, it's only worth eating for a couple of months out of the year. There's no problem. :)

I eat it with Brummel & Brown Yogurt margarine. I love that stuff.

kaplods
10-10-2007, 09:55 PM
Several times every summer I spend a day on the "sweetcorn and watermelon" diet. If it's outrageously hot, and I don't feel like cooking, having an ear or two of microwaved sweetcorn and a bowl of ice cold watermelon is a wonderfully indulgent, yet low calorie meal. No, it's not particularly balanced, but in the scheme of things it doesn't sabotage my nutrition or my weight loss.

mandalinn82
10-11-2007, 01:26 AM
Just want to point out that sweet corn (ie people-eating corn, the kind you'll get on a cob, frozen, or canned) is different than feed corn. The kind of corn you feed a cow or pig is different from the corn on the cobs, which is different than the corn that pops for popcorn. They are different varieties of the plant.

Here is a summary of the different types of corn grown in the US:
http://www.cyberspaceag.com/kansascrops/corn/typesofcorn.htm

Dent corn (the type processed and used for animal feed) has about four and a half times the fat (http://www.chow.com/stories/10552) of sweet corn, which is probably why it is used rather than sweet corn to feed livestock for "fattening up", and also to make corn oil and high fructose corn syrup.

Cuter w Curves
10-11-2007, 01:49 AM
Ok... So I don't yet have 10 posts so I can't respond via PM to the three who asked for this so let me start with the list:

PLEASE NOTE: In addition to the items on this list not including everything that contains corn, not everything on this list will contain corn. It is that they can contain corn, and therefore may need to be outright avoided or used cautiously. Read more about this on the Corn Allergens as Ingredients page. The items identified with an asterik * are the most common items that might not always contain or be derived from corn. Proceed with caution!

* Acetic acid
* Alcohol
* Alpha tocopherol
* Artificial flavorings
* Artificial sweeteners
* Ascorbates
* Ascorbic acid
* Astaxanthin
* Baking powder
* Barley malt* (generally OK, but can be contaminated)
* Bleached flour*
* Blended sugar (sugaridextrose)
* Brown sugar* (generally OK if no caramel color)
* Calcium citrate
* Calcium fumarate
* Calcium gluconate
* Calcium lactate
* Calcium magnesium acetate (CMA)
* Calcium stearate
* Calcium stearoyl lactylate
* Caramel and caramel color
* Carbonmethylcellulose sodium
* Cellulose microcrystalline
* Cellulose, methyl
* Cellulose, powdered
* Cetearyl glucoside
* Choline chloride
* Citric acid*
* Citrus cloud emulsion (CCS)
* Coco glycerides (cocoglycerides)
* Confectioners sugar
* Corn alcohol, corn gluten
* Corn extract
* Corn flour
* Corn oil, corn oil margarine
* Corn starch
* Corn sweetener, corn sugar
* Corn syrup, corn syrup solids
* Corn, popcorn, cornmeal
* Cornstarch, cornflour
* Crosscarmellose sodium
* Crystalline dextrose
* Crystalline fructose
* Cyclodextrin
* DATUM (a dough conditioner)
* Decyl glucoside
* Decyl polyglucose
* Dextrin
* Dextrose (also found in IV solutions)
* Dextrose anything (such as monohydrate or anhydrous)
* d-Gluconic acid
* Distilled white vinegar
* Drying agent
* Erythorbic acid
* Erythritol
* Ethanol
* Ethocel 20
* Ethylcellulose
* Ethylene
* Ethyl acetate
* Ethyl alcohol
* Ethyl lactate
* Ethyl maltol
* Fibersol-2
* Flavorings*
* Food starch
* Fructose*
* Fruit juice concentrate*
* Fumaric acid
* Germ/germ meal
* Gluconate
* Gluconic acid
* Glucono delta-lactone
* Gluconolactone
* Glucosamine
* Glucose*
* Glucose syrup* (also found in IV solutions)
* Glutamate
* Gluten
* Gluten feed/meal
* Glycerides
* Glycerin*
* Glycerol
* Golden syrup
* Grits
* High fructose corn syrup
* Hominy
* Honey*
* Hydrolyzed corn
* Hydrolyzed corn protein
* Hydrolyzed vegetable protein
* Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose
* Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose pthalate (HPMCP)
* Inositol
* Invert syrup or sugar
* Iodized salt
* Lactate
* Lactic acid*
* Lauryl glucoside
* Lecithin
* Linoleic acid
* Lysine
* Magnesium fumarate
* Maize
* Malic acid
* Malonic acid
* Malt syrup from corn
* Malt, malt extract
* Maltitol
* Maltodextrin
* Maltol
* Maltose
* Mannitol
* Methyl gluceth
* Methyl glucose
* Methyl glucoside
* Methylcellulose
* Microcrystaline cellulose
* Modified cellulose gum
* Modified corn starch
* Modified food starch
* Molasses* (corn syrup may be present; know your product)
* Mono and di glycerides
* Monosodium glutamate
* MSG
* Natural flavorings*
* Olestra/Olean
* Polenta
* Polydextrose
* Polylactic acid (PLA)
* Polysorbates* (e.g. Polysorbate 80)
* Polyvinyl acetate
* Potassium citrate
* Potassium fumarate
* Potassium gluconate
* Powdered sugar
* Pregelatinized starch
* Propionic acid
* Propylene glycol*
* Propylene glycol monostearate*
* Saccharin
* Salt (iodized salt)
* Semolina (unless from wheat)
* Simethicone
* Sodium carboxymethylcellulose
* Sodium citrate
* Sodium erythorbate
* Sodium fumarate
* Sodium lactate
* Sodium starch glycolate
* Sodium stearoyl fumarate
* Sorbate
* Sorbic acid
* Sorbitan
* Sorbitan monooleate
* Sorbitan tri-oleate
* Sorbitol
* Sorghum* (not all is bad; the syrup and/or grain CAN be mixed with corn)
* Starch (any kind that's not specified)
* Stearic acid
* Stearoyls
* Sucrose
* Sugar* (not identified as cane or beet)
* Threonine
* Tocopherol (vitamin E)
* Treacle (aka golden syrup)
* Triethyl citrate
* Unmodified starch
* Vanilla, natural flavoring
* Vanilla, pure or extract
* Vanillin
* Vegetable anything that's not specific*
* Vinegar, distilled white
* Vinyl acetate
* Vitamin C* and Vitamin E*
* Vitamins*
* Xanthan gum
* Xylitol
* Yeast*
* Zea mays
* Zein

* This is from a site called cornallergens[dot]com to give credit where it is due.

I am a big fan of everything in moderation. I eat potato in moderation. I eat certain meats in moderation. I eat pasta in moderation... My veggies I will admittedly pig out on but hey! Who doesn't love broccoli? (Yes... I Am frequently called twisted for that.)

Reality is that corn is in much of what we consume unless we have the time, and patience to prepare everything from scratch. When I say scratch I really mean scratch.

I cut mine based on an allergy... And in doing my research I came to a few conclusions. While not everyone is the same... Some things are most decidedly food for thought and the fact that corn is used to fatten animals up, or the fact that the worlds population has had more issues with weight control since it was added to or used in so many of the things on the list above... Or what about the fact that many are avoiding items on the list as individual items? Could it be the corn factor? Maybe, and in some cases: Quite probably.

I eat starches... Sure I do! If I am having a meat and or protine free meal I will have starch and veggies... I try to have protine and veggies or starches and veggies and avoid protine and starch combos on a regular basis. Spacing things out works for many... For me it worked... Only AFTER I took out the corn products.

I use Garfarva flour (Chick peas and farva beans) if I am not in need of a super fine texture, and I use 1 teaspoon of potato starch or the water off potatoes to make things like gravy or sauces.

I have my baked potato once in a while... And I use a small quantity of unsalted butter, a dash of sea salt and a small amount of organic sour cream. While I should be skipping the toppings... I figure once or twice a month is fine... But I can eat these things because I've figured out my "cellulite catalyst". It is corn.

Corn is a source of Vitamin A, fiber, protine, potassium (if I am recalling correctly), etc. etc.; however, what many do not realize is how hard this is for the body to digest properly.

In a fast release item like corn meal, glucose, or starch... Your body will treat this like a sugar over load as noted above. Your body THINKS you just ate the equivalent of a Twinkie. How would your body know not to produce insulin for it, or to treat it like that? It is used for that purpose in junk foods. Looking at the ingredients on "junk food" vs. items that are considered "balanced food" will shock many though. The lists often contain the same ingredients.

In a slow release method like kernels of corn... Most of you will have noticed by this point in your life that your body didn't REALLY process that corn. I would rather not elaborate on this but if anyone needs clarification then I will say this: How odd to look the same... Coming or going. How can it have been "properly" digested and still look the same? :?:

Let's discuss the fact that the fields used to grow corn have to be rotated on a cycle because it takes SO much out of the soil, and is so toxic to the soil that if it is left continually then it will drain the ability to grow anything including corn on that soil.

Or what about the recent rise in something called "Popcorn Lung"? (I swear... I am NOT making this up. It is some wild stuff!) I STRONGLY urge those using microwave popcorn of any type to PLEASE look this up, and to read the quoted news clip even if you use butter. Because of my allergy to the corn... we knew I was having problems if I was around it during or after popping... What I didn't realize is that it could be the chemical compound as well.

'Popcorn lung' patient inhaled fumes daily

Updated Thu. Sep. 6 2007 11:11 AM ET

Associated Press

CENTENNIAL, Colo. -- Wayne Watson loved microwave popcorn so much he would eat at least two bags each night, breathing in the steam from the just-opened package, until doctors told him it may have made him sick.

Watson, whose case of "popcorn lung" is the sole reported case of the disease in a non-factory worker, said he is convinced his heavy consumption of popcorn caused his health problems.

In an interview with The Associated Press on Wednesday, the 53-year-old furniture salesman had a message to convey: "America: Read the labels, and just be careful about what we put into our bodies and always practice moderation," Watson said. "Don't go crazy."

Popcorn flavouring contains the chemical diacetyl, which has been linked to lung damage in factory workers testing hundreds of bags of microwave popcorn per day and inhaling its fumes. The chemical is a naturally occurring compound that gives butter its flavour and is also found in cheese and even wine, according to the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health.

It's been approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a flavour ingredient, but hundreds of workers have sued flavouring makers in recent years for lung damage.

There are no warnings from federal regulators, nor is there medical advice on how consumers should treat news of the rare, life-threatening disease, bronchiolitis obliterans, also known as popcorn lung.

Dr. Cecile Rose, a lung specialist at the National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver who diagnosed Watson's case in February, told the AP that no definite link has been established between Watson's heavy popcorn consumption and his lung disease, but that "the possibility raises public health concerns."

Doctors tested Watson's home for levels of diacetyl fumes and found that while popcorn was microwaved in the kitchen, peak levels of the fumes were similar to those measured in factories, Rose said.

While she still lets her kids microwave popcorn at home, Rose said she is concerned that the high levels of fumes measured at Watson's home could be present anytime consumers microwave popcorn, and that these high levels -- and not just the cumulative effect of exposures in the factory -- could be a factor in causing the disease.

"We don't know yet. We think it's a possibility," said Rose, who recommended the popcorn bags be tested further.

On Wednesday, the nation's largest microwave popcorn maker, ConAgra, said it would stop using diacetyl within a year out of concern for its workers -- not because of risks to consumers. ConAgra makes Act II and Orville Redenbacher brands.

The Flavor and Extract Manufacturers Association said that Rose's finding does not suggest a risk from eating microwave popcorn.

Watson said he still craves popcorn but has taken his doctors' advice and snacks now on fruits and vegetables. He said his breathing has improved and he's lost 35 pounds. He no longer uses an inhaler or takes steroids.

Looking at the list above... Please... Be honest. How many items have you cut back on, or cut out completely? How many other common elements are in those?

I'm not going to tell people they can't, or even that they shouldn't... Just that they should pay attention, and be very aware. It really makes me nervous when I see people using it as a frequent item in their diet because of what it is used for in other areas.

nelie
10-11-2007, 10:56 AM
All the items you have listed above are items that are found in processed foods. I don't care for processed foods for other reasons than the corn derivatives in them but it is a good thing to note.

Also from what I read about the popcorn lung, it isn't conclusive that the ingredient added to microwave popcorn causes the lung disease that he has but manufacturers are removing the ingredient from microwave popcorn. If you read the story, he says he was eating at least 2 bags of popcorn every day. Depending on the brand, he could've been eating 400 calories per bag at at least 800 extra calories per day. So switching from butter laden popcorn to fruits and veggies would be a huge improvement for anyone. Especially since fruits and veggies have lots of nutrients that can help the body heal itself.

So I'd agree that processed items are not good for you and a lot of processed items contain corn derivatives does not mean that corn meant for eating isn't good for you. I think popcorn is also a great snack but preferably made with limited oil if any.

baffled111
10-11-2007, 11:34 AM
There is a difference between fresh corn on the cob, and corn that has been processed to behave as sugar or glue or the waxy coating for cucumbers. The problems created by corn come from processed, synthetic foods, not from eating or farming an unprocessed grain.

JayEll
10-11-2007, 11:36 AM
In a slow release method like kernels of corn... Most of you will have noticed by this point in your life that your body didn't REALLY process that corn. I would rather not elaborate on this but if anyone needs clarification then I will say this: How odd to look the same... Coming or going. How can it have been "properly" digested and still look the same?


Chew it! Most people don't chew their food nearly enough! That's why it "comes out" that way!

Jay

Glory87
10-11-2007, 11:46 AM
I try to eat as many whole foods as possible and avoid as many processed foods as possible - it is the key to my weight loss. I do buy some packaged foods for convenience (pasta, bread, tortillas, waffles) but only organic brands after carefully reading labels.

I have absolutely no problems with fresh, canned or frozen corn (close to its natural state). As far as it not being "digested" properly - welcome to the joys of insoluble fiber. Scrubs you out like a bristle brush ;)

kaplods
10-11-2007, 05:30 PM
I don't know if it really makes a difference, but my dad always said (he was raised on a farm, growing mostly corn), that most people eat sweet corn in too mature a state (those nice pretty plump kernels), but that the corn tasted better and was better for you when it was barely mature (shoepeg type, where the kernels are small and plump).

I have to agree that I prefer the taste and texture of immature corn (and it seems to digest better), but with all things I think moderation is key, and humans don't always "do" moderation well.

Cuter w Curves
10-12-2007, 01:26 AM
kaplods... That actually makes sense to me. I wonder if corn that is "over ripe" has the same situation as tree fruit that is over ripe.

Apparently there is a natural increase in the protines in fruits as they ripen. Only know that because I was talking allergies with someone though and haven't looked more into that... But it makes me wonder if that is part of it.

As for the "naturally" grown corn... It is so rare in most areas that it is actually a naturally grown variation especially considering corn pollen has actually traveled up to 5 - 10 km in the wind... So even an organic grower now has to be careful if their neighbours are heading the way of GMO.

****If I had one wish it would be that we as a society had never dove head first into something that we never fully tested. There has been some good but to keep the balance it is not all good.

SoulBliss
10-12-2007, 01:39 AM
We cut out potato for the most part because of the starch levels. Why are so many who've done that still eating corn when there are so many alternatives if they want a vegetable or whole grain that are not starch based? Hey, I am wondering what you mean by "whole grains" that aren't starch based. :)

EZMONEY
10-12-2007, 09:13 AM
Chew it! Most people don't chew their food nearly enough! That's why it "comes out" that way!

Jay

YA think? ;)

Now, what about corn flakes?

Cuter w Curves
10-12-2007, 04:22 PM
Hey, I am wondering what you mean by "whole grains" that aren't starch based. :)

I mean that they will all have starch in them but they are not all equal in the starch levels and some provide more than just your daily starch intake by way of being more nutrient rich. I worded it wrong... *got to stop typing tired lol*

Here are some interesting stats (scroll down the to weight loss/nutritional value/weight gain red stars):

Corn, Yellow (http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c21Tj.html)

Corn, White (http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c21VS.html)

The "Good" they list for both types of corn:
This food is low in Saturated Fat, and very low in Cholesterol and Sodium.

No vitamins or minerals like many others listed.

Where as a similar carb value one would be Couscous but the fat content is lower: Couscous, dry (http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c21Tu.html)

Aramanth is a bit higher in fat but has a lot of nutrients with a lower carb ratio. (http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c21TY.html)

Buckwheat is a good source of fiber and lower in fat than Aramanth. (http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c21Td.html)

Oats are great for a lot of things. (http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c21U4.html)

Quinoa is another one that will give you a lot of other things rather then just be a filler. (http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c21U1.html)

Rye (http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c21UN.html)

Wheat, Durham (http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c21Ub.html)

Just some interesting numbers to look at.

If you are going for the whole grain factor then at least make sure you are getting more out of it than just the basics. Since when did low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium become enough? Shouldn't we be trying to get more nutritional value out of our foods if we are aiming for low calorie consumption?

That site allows you to look at the cooked vs. uncooked factors for many items as well. A lot of people are counting seeds like flax seed as a "whole grain" now. Not sure if I agree but it is out there...

Suzanne 3FC
10-12-2007, 05:19 PM
The World's Healthiest Foods website includes corn and lists quite a few benefits.

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=90

Our food ranking system qualified corn as a good source of many nutrients including thiamin (vitamin B1), pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), folate, dietary fiber, vitamin C, phosphorous and manganese.

Glory87
10-12-2007, 09:22 PM
If you are going for the whole grain factor then at least make sure you are getting more out of it than just the basics. Since when did low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium become enough? Shouldn't we be trying to get more nutritional value out of our foods if we are aiming for low calorie consumption?


That is exactly what I do. If you read my success story, my main focus was to "eat foods with powerful nutritional benefits and avoid foods with limited/no nutritional benefits." That is my key to success in a nutshell.

For me, corn is a whole grain that has nutritional benefits, it didn't hinder my weight loss or my weight maintenance. I like the taste of it, I think it's good for me. I gave up a lot of stuff - fast food, soda, packaged baked goods, nearly all packaged/processed foods - corn is not a food I am willing to give up (like red wine, or dark chocolate, it has its place in my healthy lifestyle).

Everyone's weight loss is very personal and individual, you have reasons for not eating corn, that's cool, but none of your arguments have been compelling enough for me to limit corn as a whole food choice (I do completely agree with you about corn as an additive, sweetner, factor in processed foods - I really work hard to avoid foods like that).

kaplods
10-12-2007, 11:05 PM
There may be whole grains that pack in more nutrition overall than corn, but our diet isn't composed of one choice, but many. It would make just as little sense to say "I never eat green beans, because beets are more nutritious."

I suppose if you were only allowed a very limited choice of foods, you would have to choose your food items more carefully, but we're lucky (and in some ways unlucky) in this country to have an almost endless array of choices.
Choosing corn as your ONLY grain or worse only vegetable would be foolish, but so would any unbalanced way of eating. Incorporating corn into a varied diet is definitely possible.

Cuter w Curves
10-13-2007, 12:08 AM
There may be whole grains that pack in more nutrition overall than corn, but our diet isn't composed of one choice, but many. It would make just as little sense to say "I never eat green beans, because beets are more nutritious."

"I never eat green beans because..."

They taste like... :barf:

*Sorry... irresistible. made me gag and laugh to read that. It just happens to be one of the few foods int he world I can't stomach.*

I suppose if you were only allowed a very limited choice of foods, you would have to choose your food items more carefully, but we're lucky (and in some ways unlucky) in this country to have an almost endless array of choices.
Choosing corn as your ONLY grain or worse only vegetable would be foolish, but so would any unbalanced way of eating. Incorporating corn into a varied diet is definitely possible.

True enough. For those who can and do so in a diet that is well balanced... Cool. It just seems that many depend on it as well as a major item and that is maybe not so good.

Cuter w Curves
10-13-2007, 12:51 AM
That is exactly what I do. If you read my success story, my main focus was to "eat foods with powerful nutritional benefits and avoid foods with limited/no nutritional benefits." That is my key to success in a nutshell.

For me, corn is a whole grain that has nutritional benefits, it didn't hinder my weight loss or my weight maintenance. I like the taste of it, I think it's good for me. I gave up a lot of stuff - fast food, soda, packaged baked goods, nearly all packaged/processed foods - corn is not a food I am willing to give up (like red wine, or dark chocolate, it has its place in my healthy lifestyle).

Everyone's weight loss is very personal and individual, you have reasons for not eating corn, that's cool, but none of your arguments have been compelling enough for me to limit corn as a whole food choice (I do completely agree with you about corn as an additive, sweetner, factor in processed foods - I really work hard to avoid foods like that).

Fair enough.

Some can handle it and some can not.

And I can understand not giving up dark chocolate and red wine. First thing I will likely do when I get my specially compounded Benedryl is pick up something in dark chocolate. Not suppose to have it but I miss it and I have earned it. Though the quantity will be very small and if I stick with pure Belgian I have less issues with my allergy. :?::carrot:

I shouldn't do chocolate but I will pick it up and save it for a day when I am having a reaction already if that makes sense.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

I just want to point out that I'm not the only person in the world to think along these lines. Far from it.

Here are a couple pieces of interesting reading:

http://www.thedietchannel.com/Diet-and-Weight-Loss-How-High-Fructose-Corn-Syrup-Could-Be-Undermining-Your-Diet.htm

http://books.google.ca/books?id=PLbMwQut_I0C&pg=PA105&dq=Eat+Right+for+your+blood+type+Type+O+Corn&ei=pDoQR_qTAY7wpwK3reC1AQ&sig=_EQm1K9rlYcADnpASCuOzNZXMWY#PPA105,M1- Please see page 105 for the avoids list.

I will put it here too:

O blood type, the big avoids for you are wheat and corn.
A blood type, the big avoids for you are red meat, wheat, and nightshades such as eggplant, tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, and tobacco.
B, your main avoids are chicken, corn, and lentils.
AB, yours are wheat and corn.

Source: The Female Hormone Journey by Pamela Levin


I can list those all day but another one to look at is Eat Right 4 Your Blood Type. For those not wanting to spend the money on it - many public libraries have it, or chapters usually has in store reading areas. :o;)

http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipes.htm Here is his site though that is the direct link to recipes... some great ones there.

Another source of information:
http://herbtime.com/InformationPages/blood_type_o.htm
http://herbtime.com/InformationPages/blood_type_b.htm
http://herbtime.com/InformationPages/blood_type_ab.htm
http://herbtime.com/InformationPages/blood_type_a.htm

Some interesting reading in those...

Reality is that everyone will do as they please but some may be having a hard time figuring out why they can't lose and are gaining while they regularly are snacking on popcorn, or baby corn, or a product with a corn ingredient in it.

For those who can eat it... My hat is off to you. I may be allergic to it but my god I loved the taste of corn on the cob... and pops like Cream Soda are like crack in a can! I swear... I still have shaky knees when I smell it.

Nothing changes the fact that it is very horribly wrong for me... And many others out there.

Oh to be a type A with NO allergies for a day... Just one. So I could eat corn. But then I would have to give up my steak, and seafood diet. Tough life but someone has to have it. *chuckle* My mom and sister are type A's

mandalinn82
10-13-2007, 12:59 AM
Here are a couple pieces of interesting reading:

http://www.thedietchannel.com/Diet-a...-Your-Diet.htm

Just to make sure we're all on the same page...none of the people in this thread have said that High Fructose Corn Syrup is something we lost weight while eating a lot of. We're talking about whole corn - corn as a whole grain. High Fructose Corn Syrup is a processed chemical food additive, which I think most people agree isn't great for you (even if HOW bad they think it is varies). But you're not going to be ingesting HFCS by eating popcorn.

kaplods
10-13-2007, 02:08 AM
Some people find that they have more success avoiding a "weakness" food altogether than trying to eat it in moderation. And there's nothing wrong with that, but I think that moderation should be where we start, and elimination should be a last resort. I think for most people, a diet (as in way of eating) works best if it is the least restrictive possible. Everyone will have to restrict their diet to a different degree, and that's all fine, but by only restricting it as far as we have to and no further, we can experience the least amount of deprivation. That's my theory anyway, and it's been working a lot better for me than when I thought the other way around (and my list of what I "couldn't" eat was longer than the list of things I "could")

SoulBliss
10-13-2007, 05:29 AM
First thing I will likely do when I get my specially compounded Benedryl is pick up something in dark chocolate. Not suppose to have it but I miss it and I have earned it.

I don't understand that at all. How have you "earned" something you are allergic to? :?: Why will it be okay to eat one thing you are "allergic" to (chocolate) yet not another (corn)?

Tell me more about the "specially compounded" Benedryl...where do you get it? What is special about it? I am intrigued! ;)

nelie
10-13-2007, 10:50 AM
One thing I would mention is that Eat right 4 your body type is not something I would reference as a source... The information in that book is psuedo science in twisting studies with minimal conclusions and trying to state them as facts. The author has made lots of money off of it but I wouldn't judge the statements in that book as true based on the sales.

Also, I agree that no one here is saying corn derivatives and processed foods aren't good for you but Corn itself does have benefits. If you have an allergy to corn, that is one thing and feel free to avoid it.

I am all for a diverse diet and I think we should include corn as part of our diet if we enjoy it and don't have any medical reasons for not doing so. I don't care much for corn, I eat it about once or twice a year but I think it is a good addition to some dishes. I enjoy a zucchini/corn/tomato salad as well as beans mixed with corn and diced tomatoes.

My husband on the other hand loves corn and could eat it every day. I try to remember that he likes it so much so I try to buy it (mostly frozen) so that he can have it even if I don't eat it.

baffled111
10-13-2007, 11:57 AM
I try to remember that he likes it so much so I try to buy it (mostly frozen) so that he can have it even if I don't eat it.

I was a bit clever this year. While corn was at the peak of its season at the farmer's market, and extra delicious, I bought more ears than we could eat each week and processed the surplus for freezing: I just cut off the kernels and blanched them for 30 seconds or so. I'm pleased: we'll have sweet, peak corn all throughout the winter. :)

I did the same with zucchini, actually, because shredded zucchini is the most versatile food in the universe.

SoulBliss
10-13-2007, 03:50 PM
One thing I would mention is that Eat right 4 your body type is not something I would reference as a source... The information in that book is psuedo science in twisting studies with minimal conclusions and trying to state them as facts. The author has made lots of money off of it but I wouldn't judge the statements in that book as true based on the sales. :yes: I was wondering when the "Eat right for your eye/skin/hair color diet" would come out after that one was so popular! :o

kaplods
10-13-2007, 08:08 PM
This has been a bit of a peeve of mine recently: "Magical thinking" when it comes to weight loss and health advice seems. The less scientifically reasonable the theory, the more weight (pardon the pun) it is given by those who believe it.

If you can chalk ALL of our problems to a single factor (whether it be corn, or aspartame, or high fructose corn syrup, or whatever) then the answer is easy. And who doesn't want an easy answer, but easy answers are usually wrong answers.

maryblu
10-14-2007, 12:47 AM
Well said, Colleen, that "all or nothing"..."magical thinking" is more than a pet peeve; that perfection mentality derails so many of us.

I am NOT talking about food allergies, about which I know nothing.. :)

Cuter with Curves, I think you would enjoy the book Nelie mentioned: The Omnivore's Dilemma. Both SO and I are fascinated by it.....nothing is quite as it seems and the food chain/sources is so very complicated...fascinating reading.

I was reading the post about insulin resistance, and I am thankful to say I don't have any experience with that, either, but it might be helpful to pick up a copy of The Zone by Dr. Barry Sears and read it. There are ways to mitigate the quick insulin spike with some protein and high quality fat; I am not saying it is magic or that we have to be as strict as he advocates, but I did feel pretty darned good on the Zone diet, and I will be forever grateful that he got me going on Omega 3s all those years ago. My skin, hair, cholesterol and triglycerides are all enormously improved.

As for corn, can I "get an amen" for Hominy? I LOVE it!:carrot:

SoulBliss
10-14-2007, 02:52 AM
MMM, I used to love grits with (vegan) cheese, garlic powder, salt, pepper and tomatoes! I need to make that soon.

BillBlueEyes
10-14-2007, 06:55 AM
Corn-on-the-cob has been a summer favorite for the 25 months of my journey.

It's been a special joy that I grew to like it cold, without salt, and without butter. Sooooooo good :) Would NEVER have believed that I'd like corn without butter. I savor the corn-ness taste now. Think I was mostly savoring the butter and salt before.

When I pack an ear of corn with lunch for work, I don't pack bread.

maryblu (and others) - Glad you mentioned The Omnivor's Dilemma. That book helped me become even more determined to avoid processed foods, particularly those with HFCS. Early on I used "Low fat Half-and-Half" in my morning coffee. Thought I was doing good; every little bit helps. But, Geeze louise, it was an HFCS product :( So, switched back to 2% milk which is the cream in our refrigerator.

XXXXX|| 7 ||||||| 14 ||||||| 21 ||||||| 28 ||||||| 35 ||||||| 42
Completed Beck Program-day 5. 37 to go. Keep going!

Cuter w Curves
10-14-2007, 10:20 AM
I don't understand that at all. How have you "earned" something you are allergic to? :?: Why will it be okay to eat one thing you are "allergic" to (chocolate) yet not another (corn)?

Tell me more about the "specially compounded" Benedryl...where do you get it? What is special about it? I am intrigued! ;)

I am not suppose to have any chocolate. The Coco Glycerides (cocoglycerides) put it on my no go list. I have had some success with chocolate made in Europe but that has to be really, really high end.

If I have already accidentally come into contact with something then I am going to have a reaction. Those are the days where I would allow myself a tiny piece of dark chocolate. One of those... Feel better moments.

But I am waiting on the Benedryl.

The specially compounded Benedryl only contains the following 3 things:

Lactose (filler)
Gelatin Capsules (casing)
Diphenhydramine (actual chemical name of Benydryl)

It is specially compounded for me by a compounding pharmacist. Not other fillers than lactose.

Cuter w Curves
10-14-2007, 10:56 AM
Cuter with Curves, I think you would enjoy the book Nelie mentioned: The Omnivore's Dilemma. Both SO and I are fascinated by it.....nothing is quite as it seems and the food chain/sources is so very complicated...fascinating reading.

Interesting... I had someone telling me about it a month ago in the context of the over use of corn, etc.

Just haven't gotten around to that one yet.

nelie
10-14-2007, 04:22 PM
Maryblu,

I love hominy! Ok I could eat hominy every day :) My favorite hominy dish is diced zucchini, chopped onions and hominy braised in water. It is delicious :) I don't eat hominy very often though.