LA Weight Loss - What diet should I get on???




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Rockrz
07-28-2007, 12:13 AM
OK, I'm a guy...6ft 1in tall, and I somehow ended up at 293!
(I know, not good at all)

So, since many here obviously have more experience at losing weight (I, on the other hand have more experience GAINING weight)

...what diet should I get on?

I think I need some structure basically. I've started walking about a mile a day and I've read enough to understand that I need to eat organic foods (no toxins).

I guess I need something that will teach me about food along with what, when, and how to eat. Any suggestions would be appreciated.


Redeemed
07-28-2007, 12:52 AM
I think that is a very difficult question to answer. There is no perfect diet for everyone. You should def talk to your doctor first and get blood work done.

My suggestion would be to research the diets to see what works best for you and your body that you will be able to stick with. There are about a gazillion different diets out there.

You have to ask yourself if you want to count points or calories.... if you want to eliminate certain things completely from your diet or not.

I have done Atkins, Weight Watchers and counting calories. All of them worked for me at different times in my life. I think weight watchers taught me a lot about portion control which I really needed. There are many threads on this board that will give the rules or tips for specific eating plans.

Finally, I will say that for me it is better to NOT look at losing weight as a diet per se, but a change of lifestyle. Otherwise as soon as you get to your goal weight and go off of your "diet" the pounds come back on quickly.


I hope you find exactly what works for you :)

Rockrz
07-28-2007, 01:04 AM
You should def talk to your doctor first and get blood work done.Well, that was a waste of time because all these guys have is drugs they want to put you on and to make money having you come back for a bunch of checkups and tests all the time when it's not needed.

I'm perfectly healthy, except for carrying around 90 extra pounds.
But you're right about the lifestyle change. That's what I need, but it's going to have to include educating myself on food and how to eat properly.

Back in the day, I could eat anything I wanted and not gain weight but those days are gone and I didn't really catch on till I had gained a bunch of weight.

I think food education and structure is what is needed most, so anybody got any suggestions for a plan that includes these two options?


clessofme
07-28-2007, 01:29 AM
Yes the proper answer is do you research and pick the plan that works best for you... Now that we got that out of the way I would look into Weight Watchers. I know several men who have had success on this plan. They offer 2 options core or flex. Core you can eat as much as you need to feel full as long as you only eat foods on a cetain list. Flex you get a number of points that you must eat every day (points are based on weight age etc) all foods you eat convert into points. Its a great way to learn about portion control. I like WW because it still allows you to eat real food, not as much as you would have before but if you want a cheeseburger you can have it and I like that. You can attend WW meetings if you choose or do it online. I like meetings they help to hold me accountable, and educate me on different topics everyweek. Good Luck in what ever you choose.

Redeemed
07-28-2007, 12:35 PM
Well, that was a waste of time because all these guys have is drugs they want to put you on and to make money having you come back for a bunch of checkups and tests all the time when it's not needed.

I'm perfectly healthy, except for carrying around 90 extra pounds.
But you're right about the lifestyle change. That's what I need, but it's going to have to include educating myself on food and how to eat properly.

Back in the day, I could eat anything I wanted and not gain weight but those days are gone and I didn't really catch on till I had gained a bunch of weight.

I think food education and structure is what is needed most, so anybody got any suggestions for a plan that includes these two options?

Weight watchers is really good for teaching you about portion control and you learn that if you eat junk, you won't be able to eat very much and stay within your point allotment. When you start weighing and measuring your food, you realize that a cup of anything isn't really a whole bunch... But you do learn what a real portion size is.

Rockrz
07-28-2007, 12:41 PM
What about going on a liquid diet?

I've seen the Garden of Life organic whole food suppliments that you can make smoothies with that provide more nourishment than you get eating regular food.

Anybody ever try that?

Jennifer 3FC
07-28-2007, 01:04 PM
Have you thought about Body For Life? It is a very straightforward plan, and easy to keep up with if you aren't up to counting all day long. You eat 5-6 times a day, and at each meal, you either have 1 protein and one carb, or you have a protein drink with balanced carbs and protein. It turns out to be a 40/40/20 split - 40 percent each protein and carbs, and 20 percent fat. It's very easy to figure out your meals.

Here (http://www.3fatchicks.com/Fitness/Fitness_Books/Body_for_Life%3A_12_Weeks_to_Mental_and_Physical_S trength/) is our review.

He also has written Eating For Life, which is a cookbook, but the majority of the plan is also in the front half of the book, with a few updated theories.

The plan has 'free day' one day a week, but people are much more successful if they skip free day, or cut it down to 'free meal'.

The Weight Lifting (http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=80) forum also has some info about it.

Good luck!

Bikini Ready
07-28-2007, 01:07 PM
While liquid diets are quite effective and you will see results pretty quick they may still leave you creving real food and unless you have amazing will power and self control many people tend to binge. I also had a friend who did the liquid diets and then when the diet was over still didn't know how to eat normally to maintain and gained it all back.

Personally what wokes best for me is eating healthy and calorie counting. That way I can still fit in some cravings and I get to eat a variety of normal healthy foods just in smaller portions. This is also good because it helps you understand healthy eating so once you are at goal weight to maintain you get a little more calories each day.

While losing some people stick to about 1200 calories a day which is on the low end, I try to stay between 1400-1600 a day cause I work out a lot and have a very active job so I need the extra fuel. I don't know what you would need exactly but I would guess 1800ish depending on how active you are and what not.

Hope I helped a little, good luck!

1oftheLuvs
07-28-2007, 03:05 PM
I have tried just about everything... Jenny Craig, Nutrisystem, Diet Pills and Liquid Diet under a doctors care, Atkins, Low Fat, Body for Life... I can tell you it all works to lose weight...

The problem begins when you lose the weight and you are no longer on a "diet". Each and every time I lost, I gained back what I lost plus some. I yo-yo dieted my way to a point that I was over 100 pounds overweight.

What I finally figured out (and it only took me about 25 years! :yikes:) is that whatever you do, it needs to be a change in lifestyle, not a diet.

Find something that you can do for the rest of your life... not just until you lose the weight. I decided for me it's South Beach... It's not for everyone, but my husband and I love it... We're losing weight, feel great and love the food. Research any program you think you are interested in and see if it's something you feel you can live with...

:goodluck:

WindyCityChick
07-28-2007, 03:13 PM
Just to echo what everyone else has already said - you need to pick the diet that will work for you. They are all possible paths to weight loss, and only you can determine whether that means following South Beach, Weight Watchers, whatever...the question is whether the rules of the diet you choose are something you can live with without feeling deprived.

There are lots of good posts to help you understand each diet in their respective forums, and I'd recommend just tooling around each of those sections and looking at each diet in connection with your lifestyle. I'm a calorie counter. For me, I didn't want rigid structure, and I wanted to find something I could do for the rest of my life, so I took what seemed like the most simple and flexible approach, by simply logging what I ate every day in Fitday, and making sure calories in were less than calories out.

Good luck, and whatever you choose, stick around and let us know how it's going!