Exercise! - This weight loss story inspired me to want to run...don't know where to start. Help!




Mini-Me
07-22-2007, 09:05 PM
I don't know what it is about THIS STORY (http://www.theweighwewere.com/Read-Weight-Loss-Stories/469.html) about a woman who lost 55 pounds running, but all weekend, all I can think is: I want to run!

Can anyone give me ideas where to start? Any more success stories? Hers is SOOOO motivating!


LisaMarie71
07-22-2007, 09:56 PM
I can't get that article to come up for some reason -- I'm just getting the title and a blank page. My computer's screwy lately. I'll try to read it later. Anyway ... many of the folks on 3FC who have become runners started with a program called "Couch to 5K," which you can find on coolrunning.com. I started with that, though I tweaked it a bit, and now I've lost 103 pounds and am training for a half marathon. Here are some bits of advice from what I've learned:

*Start out VERY slow. It may feel like you're more "plodding" than "running," but it's all about getting your body used to it gradually. Do NOT worry about speed for a very, very long time, if ever!
*When you get to the point where you can run for 30 minutes straight, sign up for a 5k and start training for it. That's a surefire way of making sure you stick with it! And then KEEP signing up for races!
*Read and post in the Cool Runners thread -- you'll find lots of inspiration there.
*Track your runs in a spreadsheet or exercise log so you can see all the lovely progress you make.
*Don't assume that running will make you lose weight. Obviously it's a fantastic cardio exercise and burns tons of calories, but sometimes people make the mistake of believing they can eat lots more if they run. You still have to track your calories and burn more than you consume.
*Believe it or not, running is highly addictive, and you may be tempted to do more of it than you should. Take extra precautions about staying injury-free -- research how to prevent injuries on websites like coolrunning, and definitely see a doctor about anything that feels sketchy!
*Shoes, shoes, shoes. Speaking of injury prevention, it's all about getting the right shoes for your feet, so you probably want to visit a store that specializes in running shoes.

Most of all, have fun with it -- it really is addictive, and if you have an inclination toward it, you're probably going to love it. I was the most unathletic person on God's green earth, and I ran 12 miles the other day. A year ago, I couldn't run 12 feet. ANYONE can be a runner.

Ilene
07-22-2007, 10:05 PM
Check this plan out The Couch-to-5K Running Plan (http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_3/181.shtml) many new runners start there...

Good luck, keep us posted on your progress and visit our Cool Runners thread where we share running experiences


MariaMaria
07-22-2007, 10:27 PM
*When you get to the point where you can run for 30 minutes straight, sign up for a 5k and start training for it. That's a surefire way of making sure you stick with it! And then KEEP signing up for races!

Eh. There are many, many runners who run for years or decades and have no interest in racing.

Ilene
07-22-2007, 10:28 PM
Eh. There are many, many runners who run for years or decades and have no interest in racing.Yes, but they are a LOT of fun and very motivating :yes:

MariaMaria
07-22-2007, 10:41 PM
For people who want competition or comraderie, they're fun. For people who aren't interested in competition, or who don't want to get up at some obscenely early time on a weekend morning, or who love running because it's not a group activity or because it's a chance to be alone with their thoughts or because it doesn't have tangible goals, races are more like torture. There's room for everyone, and my point was that you don't need to race in order to run.

JayEll
07-22-2007, 11:00 PM
Of course what you say is true, MariaMaria, but why be so negative about it? Are you one of the runners who doesn't like to compete?

There's room for everyone. No one is saying that anyone HAS to enter races--it's just an idea for those who might want to try it, as motivation.

Jay

wisher
07-23-2007, 01:51 AM
I want to run a 5K not because I want to compete with anyone, I'm not really a competitive person, however I know how absolutely amazing it would feel to cross that finish line and know that I made a goal, actually trained for it and succeeded. I would be so proud of myself!

But I'm getting off topic. As someone said above start slow and don't get discouraged! When I first started I couldn't even run for a full minute! Now I can run much longer, I can run hills, I can actually run sprints, it CAN be done! Just keep at it and you can be a runner :D

WindyCityChick
07-23-2007, 02:01 AM
Another late-onset runner here. You've gotten great advice already from Lisa and the others, but I thought I'd chime in with another recommendation for the couch to 5K plan on the coolrunning website. I followed this program when I started running, and it was perfect for gradually easing into running in a way that lets you build up your muscles and endurance safely.

I also feel the need to echo Lisa's advice on the shoes - it really is so important to get a pair that works for your individual needs. Do not just go to a sportmart-type store - instead, you should visit a store that specializes in running shoes so that they can analyze your stride.

Finally, if you're looking for a little inspiration, I'd recommend a book called "The Courage to Start". The author was an overweight, out of shape non-athlete who took up running in his middle age and now runs marathons and has a column in Runner's World for the "penguins" of the world (i.e., those of us who are a little slow and don't have the most elegant stride, but still keep plodding forward!)

Good luck, and please do come and post on the coolrunners thread, we'd love to hear about your progress!

rockinrobin
07-23-2007, 06:39 AM
For people who want competition or comraderie, they're fun. For people who aren't interested in competition, or who don't want to get up at some obscenely early time on a weekend morning, or who love running because it's not a group activity or because it's a chance to be alone with their thoughts or because it doesn't have tangible goals, races are more like torture. There's room for everyone, and my point was that you don't need to race in order to run.

Well of course Maria, racing isn't for everyone. I mean come on - talking about stating the obvious. Why did that even needed to be posted? This is about supporting people and their efforts - not making people feel uncomfortable. I'm just not quite sure I get the purpose of this post - :shrug:

LisaMarie71
07-23-2007, 09:03 AM
I don't get the purpose of that post either. As everyone knows, I'm slow as molasses, so the idea that I think races are about competition is pretty laughable anyway. The reason I suggest signing up for races is because it's one way of making you stick with running. If you're not always motivated to get up and run because of the sheer love of running, you might get up and do it because you know you have a race coming up. That works for me some days, and as I said...I was giving advice based on what I have learned, as an unathletic person who became a runner.

The funny part is that being alone with my thoughts is probably the biggest reason I love running. That and racing are hardly mutually exclusive. Races happen every few weeks or months (whenever you feel like doing them) -- they don't happen every time you run. I know that sounds like stating the obvious too, but apparently I need to.

I'm sorry if I sound a bit hostile -- it's just that this isn't the first time someone has been extremely negative toward one of my posts about running, and I'm not thrilled when people put a damper on my enthusiasm about something that has changed my life. Especially if negativity seems to be the ONLY thing they have to offer.

bdandy3
07-23-2007, 11:08 AM
Has anyone been really overweight when they staerted running? Is this possible? Is it a good idea? Love to hear your opinions!

wisher
07-23-2007, 11:40 AM
I started running early on in my weightloss journey when I weighed around 240, then I became a slacker, stopped and didn't start again until I was quite a bit lighter at 210 or so. I heard lots of people saying I should wait so as not to put all that stress on my joints but then I also read a lot of articles written by people who know what they're talking about that running isn't really as bad as everyone thinks and that running can actually IMPROVE joint pain because it strengthens all the little muscles around your joints that support them. For me this was totally true. Yeah for the first week I was really sore but after I got into my routine I noticed my knee pain going away. About a month ago I slacked off and stopped running for about 2 weeks and when I started again I noticed the knee pain again, but after another week of running it went away!

So anyway I suppose this is my long winded way of saying that you can start anytime! Just try it out, start with short intervals (as I said above I could only run for about 30 seconds when I first started) and work your way up!

bdandy3
07-23-2007, 11:59 AM
thanks, Wisher! its always good to hear from someone who's been there! :)

JayEll
07-23-2007, 01:10 PM
I am a bit older, and I only just started jogging and running briefly, now that I'm down from 198 to 155. I have to be careful because jogging and running can make my joints and ligaments sore. Also, the thing about the shoes is absolutely true--you need the best ones you can get, that fit your foot correctly.

Jay

MariaMaria
07-23-2007, 01:34 PM
Racing is ONE way of sticking with running. If it works for you, that's great. If it doesn't, I don't see a problem with making the point that running is a big activity, with room for lots of different ways to go about it.

I've been running for close to a decade. I don't race. I run. It can be done. Probably more runners do not race or do not race regularly, than do.

I'm thrilled for the women here who've found racing to be a motivator, but I think that sometimes their entirely justified pride in their accomplishments maybe gives a one-sided view of what running is. One doesn't need to do 10-mile long runs or train for marathons or even race 5Ks to be a runner. All one needs to do is run-- tie on your shoes, strap on a bra, and head for the sidewalk. When you get tired, stop and walk. Run again when you feel better. Then do it again in a few days. And keep doing it. Abracadabra, you're a runner.

I'm not seeing hostility in expanding the hows and whys.

Mini-Me
07-23-2007, 01:36 PM
Has anyone been really overweight when they staerted running? Is this possible? Is it a good idea? Love to hear your opinions!

That's what I've been wondering, too, but it sounds like anyone can start anytime, as long as they have no major joint problems, they start slow and get good shoes. Yes?

I might go out today and get fitted. Can I go to a mall store that sells sneakers, or do I need to go to a specialty store? Any things I should look for or ask for? Sorry for all of the questions, but I just want to make sure I don't many any major mistakes.

It will probably be a looooooooooooooong time before I'm ready for a race, but at least I'm ready to take the first step, right?

I found some more running stories at that site:

I Ran Off 60 Pounds (http://www.theweighwewere.com/Read-Weight-Loss-Stories/622.html)

Running Buddies Helped Him Shed Pounds (http://www.theweighwewere.com/Read-Weight-Loss-Stories/running-weight-loss-story.html)

I Started With Just A Slow Half Mile (http://www.theweighwewere.com/Read-Weight-Loss-Stories/84.html)

Brazil Woman Loses 160 Pounds Through Diet, Exercise (http://www.theweighwewere.com/Read-Weight-Loss-Stories/538.html)

Running Helped Him Shed Nearly 40 Pounds (http://www.theweighwewere.com/Read-Weight-Loss-Stories/470.html)

I'm psyched! It feels better to be focused on something fitness instead of diet, diet, diet all the time:carrot:

All one needs to do is run-- tie on your shoes, strap on a bra....

You mean I have to wear a BRA to run?!?! I quit ;)

MariaMaria
07-23-2007, 02:23 PM
I might go out today and get fitted. Can I go to a mall store that sells sneakers, or do I need to go to a specialty store? Any things I should look for or ask for? Sorry for all of the questions, but I just want to make sure I don't many any major mistakes.

Go to a running specialty store and tell them that you want to start to run. (There's a list of stores here: http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-240-319--1048-0,00.html) They'll look at your feet and work from there.

Get a pair or two of proper running socks as well, and fit the shoes while you're wearing the socks.

Mini-Me
07-23-2007, 02:25 PM
Thank you, Maria!!

Sheila53
07-23-2007, 04:00 PM
All one needs to do is run-- tie on your shoes, strap on a bra, and head for the sidewalk.

So in the interest of additional viewpoints, I have to disagree with the last part of the above statement. I find sidewalks to be a very dangerous place to run (and even walk!). They are often cracked, uneven, and concrete is rated the worst surface to run on. I wouldn't recommend running on sidewalks, but I know many people do. If you're starting out, you might want a softer, more even surface until you get used to running. My favorite places to run in my area are bike paths, which are asphalt. Asphalt ranks just under the treadmill in surface ratings.

Sheila53
07-23-2007, 04:12 PM
As everyone knows, I'm slow as molasses. . .

Your long run pace is faster than my 5K racing pace, so if you're as slow as molasses, then I'm as slow as molasses in Alaska on a winter's night!! :lol:

WaterRat
07-23-2007, 04:24 PM
Mini-Me, check out YP1's story (http://www.3fatchicks.com/forum/showthread.php?t=84623) for losing weight using running for exercise. Very inspiring.

And Sheila, trust me - no one is running on a winter's night in Alaska. :rofl:

LisaMarie71
07-23-2007, 04:31 PM
I don't race. I run. It can be done.

I hate to keep this going, but I can't understand why you think I was saying otherwise. "It can be done?" Do you seriously think anyone wouldn't think so? I suggested that signing up for races can be a motivational tool. Again, being a runner and being a runner who occasionally signs up for races are not two mutually exclusive things. I've done a whopping three races. For the VAST majority of people, they have absolutely nothing to do with competition. I suppose I'm just bothered by the fact that you seem to think it's a bad suggestion simply because YOU choose not to participate in races. But whatever. I get the impression it wouldn't matter what I said either way.

I agree, Sheila, that sidewalks are horrible. I try to avoid them. When I was doing many of my runs on them, I had some pains in my knees and hips that I don't get when I run on other surfaces. And yes, my speed has certainly increased, but I still feel slow!

MiniMe, you'll find that your running will be tailored to your individual preferences, of course, like anything else. That hardly needs to be stated. I got the impression you were looking for advice from people who went from a sedentary life to becoming runners, and I'm certainly one of those people. I'm not an utter moron -- I have a few brain cells knocking around up there -- so I didn't think you were going to copy my experience exactly. I hope you didn't think I was suggesting you should.

YP1
07-23-2007, 04:42 PM
Hellooooo... I see I've already been linked, but I'll chip in anyway.

I wanted to run before I wanted to lose weight, I did a 1 mile race which shocked me into realising how unfit I was, then I went to the gym and found out how much I weighed :yikes:

I didn't start running again straight away until I was a bit fitter, but I did my first 5k at 220lb (ish), and had been training (and losing weight) for a while building up to that.

Just take it slowly and steadily. Not wanting to inflame the debate more, but I would sign up for a race when you first start. It's then that you really need the motivation to keep going. Once you can run 5k or so relatively comfortably (whether you take walk breaks or not - whatever feels good for you), it's a lot easier to motivate yourself to go out and do it. It's when you are struggling to get past 10 minutes at a time that the added incentive of a race can keep you going.

If you try it and don't like it, by all means don't race again, but hopefully by then you'll have found some running routes you like, or running buddies, or other things you like about running, and you can focus on those.

I vary. I do race, and I do train for target races (there are also some I just turn up and do for the fun of it). But there are also days when I just want to get out into the open air and run. I don't have a route or a distance in mind, I just go out and I enjoy myself.

Mini-Me
07-23-2007, 04:47 PM
I got the impression you were looking for advice from people who went from a sedentary life to becoming runners...

I am. I'm kind of 'ignoring' the debate...at least i'm trying.:dizzy:

Off to read about YP1:carrot:

alinnell
07-23-2007, 04:52 PM
I did a 5k a few months back, but not because I wanted to, it was a family thing. DS could get extra credit for his PE class in school if he participated in some extracurricular activity. So I signed up the whole family (as well as DD's friend). I actually had a great time! I had no notions whatsoever of running any of it, but I ended up doing a few sprints. It felt good. I actually enjoyed getting to the finish line (you get a LOT of encouragement) to find out how fast/slow I was. I think we did it in 43 minutes (DD and her friend who did not run at all came in about 5 minutes later). I was quite pleased with myself. I may do it again next year (we don't have many races around here).

Ilene
07-23-2007, 05:14 PM
I am. I'm kind of 'ignoring' the debate...at least i'm trying.:dizzy:

:high: Sista!! Me too ;)

dressagequeen
07-23-2007, 05:37 PM
Everyone has given you great advice. I started running only a few months ago, and I'm not any "spring chicken." I had been doing elliptical for cardio, and I found running to burn more calories as I actually had to pick up my feet instead of just pushing them around.

I did run a 5K, and now I'm working on stamina so I can run longer instead of having to stop and walk. It doesn't matter how fast or slow you are, I found out. It's only exercise.

Put on your shoes (and bra) and go! You can do it. We all had to start somewhere.

Good Luck!

cakses
07-23-2007, 05:46 PM
I started at 220 and am still close to that (maybe a few pounds lighter) and I am loving it. I do the C25K program and the first two weeks hurt a bit and I was cursing that I lived in a 2 story house and had to chase my kids up and down the stairs a lot haha. I am on week 4 and still loving it.

BecomingFit
07-23-2007, 07:12 PM
I started running at 220 pounds. I run 5k everyday. I don't want to race. I just like to run to help keep my fit. I hated running at the beginning but just did it and said I would fake it till I make it. Now I enjoy running but have no desire ever to race. I didn't think I would ever be able to run so this was an accomplishment for me. I hope you do find what your are looking for.
Good luck.
Cakes-way to go