Exercise! - Easy running program needed, please




annk
05-26-2007, 08:50 PM
Hi!

A while back someone posted a great schedule to ease yourself into running. My problem has always been pushing myself too far too soon and then getting discouraged because it was SO HARD! One more thing: I'm currently 256 but have a lot of endurance and am in good health, but is it safe to start running at such a high weight? I know I can't get any medical advice here but if anyone has started running at a similar weight, that would be helpful to know.

Does anyone have a tried-and-tested method of "walk this many minutes, then run this many minutes, build up over time" sort of thing?

Also, I'd really like to do this around the lake near home (nice and flat!) but am really nervous about the looks I'll get as I huff and puff and jiggle. Any advice for just not caring and doing it anyway?

Thank you, thank you, thank you in advance! I'm ready to get started!


sportmom
05-26-2007, 08:55 PM
Check out coolrunner.com for the Couch to 5K program. It's exactly what you're looking for, plus with the benefit of bulletin boards over there where you can chat with others going thru the program with you. As far as being thought of as silly or goofy, they even said over there, anyone out running or walking is also trying to improve their health, and will only think well of you for trying to do the same. Anyone else, who cares? Put on your mp3 or ipod and you won't notice anyway. Good luck!

finn
05-28-2007, 06:43 AM
Yup Couch to 5k is what I did - it really works!

I started running at about 230lbs and it was fine....screw other people - Put your headphones n and just do your thing...


AnneWonders
05-29-2007, 09:32 AM
I found C25K too difficult when I started and just put my own program together. Basically, I ran until I felt like I was dying (maybe 30 sec at first) and then kept running for a few more seconds (10-30 seconds), and then walked until I was almost but not completely comfortable, then repeated. I had a 2.5 mile loop that I walked, then walked/ran, then ran/walked, until I could run the whole thing. It took about 2 and a half months to work up.

I know a lot of C25K dropouts out there, but running isn't hopeless if it is too much for you. FWIW, I've done many races including one marathon and about six half marathons. Slow progression does work.

Anne

MariaMaria
05-29-2007, 07:32 PM
Basically, I ran until I felt like I was dying (maybe 30 sec at first) and then kept running for a few more seconds (10-30 seconds), and then walked until I was almost but not completely comfortable, then repeated.

This isn't all that different from very very mainstream recommendations (Glover, Galloway).

Start with a time block, usually 20 or 30 minutes. For the first week, you're going to walk the whole thing. No running allowed. Walk for exercise, not for a nice evening stroll. Starting the next week, you're going to walk for the first five minutes and the last five, no running allowed, but for the middle 20 minutes start running slowly; when you get tired, walk until you feel good again; repeat for the 20 minute block. Gradually your running time will increase and your walk breaks in between will decrease. Don't push yourself-- if it's not easy to keep running, you should be walking.

You've had your whole life to get into the shape you're in (or not in) now. You're not going to turn into a great distance runner overnight. And that's okay.

IMO C25K is way too more ambitious for most inactive people and the speed at which it increases activity will tend to lead to injury and/or dropouts.

boohgirl
05-29-2007, 07:48 PM
Here's a program I used a couple years ago. I actually did get up to 2 miles in the 2 months and then my schedule changed and I fell off the program. Now I'm back to walking, but I hope to try it again soon.

http://www.runningplanet.com/training/beginning-runner-program.html

annk
05-29-2007, 08:54 PM
Thank you for all the replies! It seems that slowly but surely is the way to go! Thanks again; all of you who have done it inspire me! :)

Ann