Weight Loss Support - Is this safe?




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LaBonita
04-14-2007, 12:22 PM
So I'm coming out of a cycle of not exercising and not eating well (it's been about 2 weeks). I'm trying to come up with a new workout plan. I'd like to incorporate Health Magazine's Walk to Run plan, as well as some HIIT workouts.

My question is...is it safe to run 5 days a week? The walk to run plan has me running 30-35 minutes, 3 days a week, alternating running and walking. And then HIIT of course is a 17-minute workout where I sprint for 30 seconds and walk slow for 2 minutes. I know a lot of people run that much, but I just want to make sure it's safe. I'm 21 years old, if that does anything to tell me whether it's safe or not. And some days I will be doing weight training or pilates as well. Thanks for the input.


JayEll
04-14-2007, 01:51 PM
If you have any question about this, it's best to consult a health professional. No one here can really tell you that. I mean, it "sounds" safe to me because you are young, and you are overweight but not obese, but I'm not your doctor and how would I know? So, check with your doc! :D

Jay

Nikaia
04-14-2007, 05:59 PM
I think I'd suggest you start out for the first week or so doing just the three days a week. Let your body have a week or two to adjust to this new running thing, let it figure out what you want it to do. It'll also give you some time to catch any odd aches or pains that might need checked out (most don't, but it'll give you time to know what you personally need to look out for) before you put added stress on your body.

But considering that you're young, and probably in relatively good health, I wouldn't think 5 days a week is a bad idea. I just wouldn't start out with it - there's always the danger that you'll get really sore/tired, then get frustrated, and give up on it altogether. Just personally, I always advocate easing into a new thing.

Either way you go, good luck with it! :)


Kery
04-14-2007, 06:01 PM
What JayEll said. In theory, I think it's safe, but asking your physician is always best, if only 'just in case of'. At your weight and age, though, unless you have specific/hidden health problems, it normally shouldn't be a problem. Make sure hopwever to wear appropriate running shoes. There was a time I used to have what I thought were good shoes, but weren't, and this quickly turned to be awful for the hips (the key word being "quickly", so I also quickly bought better shoes, but might as well spare you the trouble in the first place :D).

poppins3
04-14-2007, 06:07 PM
I'm on my last week of C25K (a nine-week program in which I ran 3x per week), and while I can now run 3 miles without stopping, I wouldn't feel comfortable running everyday.

I would consider starting with your HIIT on the elliptical or walking. A pace of 4.9 - 5.2 can be very, very difficult when walking!

Ready2ShedLBS
04-14-2007, 09:06 PM
I do HIIT 6 days a week.. when I first started it was about 4 times a week, but I dont have a problem with it personally. My only problem with running as a whole if I run for longer than a min ( literally) my shins start hurting.. I dont know whats up with that.. so the sprints work well for me.

drake3272004
04-15-2007, 12:25 AM
If you have health concerns, then def talk to your doctor first.
And depending on how athletic you've been before, you may have to ease into it. Don't overdo right away, or you'll have an excuse to just not do it at all. Listen to your body!

lumifan4ever
04-15-2007, 10:17 AM
I agree with listening to your body. It will tell you all you need to know. And definately get "running"shoes. I tried running for awhile....well, jogging anyways. I got up to where I could run a mile without stopping to catch my breath, but then i started having pains in my knees and I have to be careful because I have weak ankles (I used to twist them as a teenager anytime i had to "run" anywhere). That's why I loved the elliptical machine at the gym. It was alot like running but without the jarring on the knees. But definately start out slow, and maybe make it every other day. Good luck!! :-)

Zorak
04-15-2007, 10:36 AM
If you want to start running, then it is imperative that you get the right running shoe for your foot and gait. Otherwise, you will get injured. Runner's World has a list (http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-240-319--1048-0,00.html)of speciality running stores. There you will be properly fitted for the right shoe.

And don't go to a regular shoe store for your running shoes. The salesmen there do not know how to fit a running shoe. There's a lot more to it than simply finding the right size. ;)

Once you have your shoes, you can build up to running five times a week over time. However if you overtrain, you'll get injured.

So I would just run three times a week for now.

twistedhoneydew
04-15-2007, 11:13 AM
Ready2ShedLBS: Congratulations, you have shin splints! Fortunately shin splints are usually pretty easy to manage. Make sure you're using good form and good shoes, and if that doesn't fix it try warming up your shins before you start. I do toe-taps, which have never failed me...flex and point, alternating right and left feet, first ten times, then fifteen, then twenty, then I feel a moderate burn and start my walking warm-up.

LaBonita
04-15-2007, 01:33 PM
Thanks for the advice everyone. :) I'm still thinking about what to do...and i'll definitely take all your advice into account. Thanks again!

Is that really me
04-15-2007, 06:34 PM
For what it's worth -- I started out walking then slow jogging in the beginning of January. Started at 3.5 worked my way up to 4.3. Did this M-F for about 8 weeks. I was on a treadmill for nearly an hour each day I did this (5 days/wk). My legs were always tired. Even though I took Sat and Sun off, they were still tired. Eventually I got mentally tired of getting on the darn thing and took a break. I went back to the TM but doing 25 minutes of HIIT. I usually do a M, W, F schedule. I find I can run much faster now (4.6 is not a problem) w/intervals up to 6.5 (that's the highest I can run right now). I don't follow a "set" workout but rather listen to my body. I use the perceived exertion scale and try to keep a range between 6-8. There are times when I push it really hard and have to slow down to a 4.0 walk for a brief recovery period. :D My legs feel great when I run and are never tired. Am also doing strength training (upper and lower body) and believe this has helped a great deal. When you use the same muscles over and over in the same manner, the will acclimate. Strength work works the muscles in a differnt way (squats, lunges, etc.) and helps w/the running. I also walk my dog 3-5 days a week; 1.5 miles at a shot, up and down hills. I'm not interested in "long distance" or "running" in the real world. I thought I was when I first started on the TM but realized it wasn't for me.

Jo

freiamaya
04-15-2007, 09:44 PM
Absolutely safe. ABSOLUTELY. Provided that you have EXCELLENT footwear - don't cheap out here - and vary your distances - and don't sprint all the time - and take ONE FULL REST DAY A WEEK. The best programs involve a switch-up between short distances (3-5 km), long distances (5-8 km), and sprint work for aerobic conditioning (actually called FARTLET TRAINING - seriously - it's a Swedish word, I think). Working up to this is a great idea. Do lots of walking and ease into the running, but walk at least one hour a day. I found that when I was at my lowest weight (which was 10 lbs heavier than you) and most fit (6 years ago - SIGH), I walked to and from work (5 km each way) and RAN 5-8 km 6 days a week too. I did this for three years. Never had a shin splint. Never had a knee issue. Never had a problem. My longest run was 17 km (2 hours 15 minutes). Seriously. BUT, I wound up moving, changing my routine and lifestyle, and LOST THE EDGE. What I wouldn't give to get back there...sigh...