Weight Loss Support - What is your relationship with food?




Runundefined
04-09-2007, 07:19 PM
Mine is an entirely all or nothing mentality… not meaning that I eat it all or eat nothing.. but that I have to either LOVE food.. all the nuances of it.. cook wonderful (huge) multi course meals, elaborate, interesting foods, (I have been told I truly am a gourmet cook), raising my own herbs and going to three different stores at a time just for the “right” ingredients. (I have over 40 cook books), I would even order an ingredient on line if I couldn’t find it in a store.

I either have to go all out and subsequently STAY fat (was over 100 pounds over weight) or I have to focus on food as nothing at all but nourishment alone and derive almost no pleasure from it (this is my “nothing” mentality)…

It’s sad and not a fun way to live (food wise-but food is not our lives right?) but I really had to get out of that food is so wonderful mentality-and stop celebrating each day with it.. you know bake those cakes, roasts those expensive cuts of meat.. the entire aspect of it is just SO hard for me..

It's ingrained in us.. we celebrate with it, mourn with it, nourish and love with it..

Now I just try to see food as needing to be eaten to live.. that is what it is for.. right? at least that is where I am now.. some day I would love to switch that thinking.. but not right now... it’s too hard.. one wonderful meal and I am off and running again.. I even had to stop watching my VERY fav. FoodTV..

I am almost afraid to "enjoy" the taste of food anymore because I just want to continue to eat it.. If the food is "boring" or portion controlled (as the frozen entrees) I do alot better..

I do miss the way the house smells at dinner time.. and the fond look on my husband’s face when he comes home from a hard day at work.. and yes I feel guilty feeding him boring frozen meals (Healthy Choice, Lean Cuisine, etc.. ) and SF jello desserts, yet ANOTHER salad (how many ways can you TRULY) make a salad and it still be healthy? and micro-popcorn (fills you up!) but he is overweight too.. and seems to be ok with it.. it’s sad.. I feel like a huge aspect of me has died..

I tried cooking "more healthy" and I am sure many of you cook and do wonderful meals that are low fat/low cal.. I have LOTS of recipes and many, many cookbooks.. I just can’t seem to get enthused enough to cook something that seems “less than” to me.. you know what I mean? I guess right now I am just going to have to deal with it.. and keep telling myself “eat to live, not live to eat”…


nelie
04-09-2007, 07:30 PM
I really enjoy the food I eat. I can't say there is something I eat that I don't enjoy. I also understand that I don't have to eat huge portions of it to enjoy it. Last week, DH brought home a bakery item that one of his coworkers had made. I'd never tasted it before. DH was given one for me and one for himself. I ate half of mine and gave the other half to DH. I can't tell you how much I enjoyed it and I didn't feel guilty even though it wasn't something on my plan.

I think it'd be tough for someone to try to lose weight without taking pleasure from food at least in some part. It is a balancing act between calories, portions and all that but it can be achieved.

alinnell
04-09-2007, 07:32 PM
Have you checked out Cooking Light? They have amazing recipes that will allow you to go back to enjoying yourself while cooking AND being able to eat a healthy meal. Often the recipes are tailored to 4 servings, but if you cut it in half, you'll still enjoy everything without the temptation to overeat. Frankly, I get terribly bored just doing the heat and eat thing with frozen meals. I, too, love cooking and I have so much fun planning my meals. And the bonus is, my kids are really enjoying all the new flavors I've been cooking up!


funnygirl33
04-09-2007, 07:42 PM
I have a stupid problem. When I cook I eat like there is no tomorrow. I eat all that I have cooked and sometimes that is for 5 people! I dont have discipline in enything.

Runundefined
04-09-2007, 07:59 PM
I think it is fear.. I know how to cook lighter foods.. but they don't seem "worth it" because I find them not interesting.. I am so used to rich, elaborate food. I am also like funnygirl.. I tend to eat all I cook..

Hi Allison!
I actually have LOTS of Cooking Light magazines and a couple of their year end compilation cookbooks.. I have cooked a few of their recipes.. what is your favorite?

I guess for me right now I am just afraid.. it didn't work before, (the cooking lighter meals).. it always would lead to overeating..

Nelie,
Of course you are absolutely right.. I miss the joy.. and I know I can't do this "forever".. I think that is what started me on this topic.. I have to change some of this.. maybe one meal a week to start!

Thanks ladies!
Cary

NWGal
04-09-2007, 08:03 PM
Past relationship was not good because I used to eat like a zombie. I was not paying attention at all as to what I was putting into my mouth. I fell into a "food coma" so often that I sometimes lost track or time. No kidding, it's that bad.
New relationship is wonderful. I watch what I eat and savor every bite. When I eat, I turn off the tv.

JayEll
04-09-2007, 08:13 PM
It was fun to overeat, and to overeat really good food.

I'm still carrying a lot of that really good food around with me all the time, just under my skin. ;)

I still enjoy food now, but having followed my program for months, I find I no longer can overeat like I used to. For one thing, I no longer have the capacity. And I am very aware now of what I am eating and what its "calorie cost" is, having had a lot of practice. (I'm a calorie counter.)

I don't keep eating until the food's all gone anymore. Even a single bite of something really good is a complete experience all in itself, and I no longer have to keep going. In fact, I can be happy just smelling good food, without feeling like I "have" to eat it.

Jay

Runundefined
04-09-2007, 08:19 PM
Jay,
you are living my dream..
but to be able to smell food and not feel like you have to eat it (some type of food I love) is beyond me.. I think it would actually be physically painful!

Cary

Sunnigummi
04-09-2007, 08:23 PM
I'm getting to be a calorie counter too, JayEll! :D

As for my relationship with food, I used to be embarrassed to eat (high weight from an early age), but now I can control my portions and have identified the time of day that I am the hungriest and when I make the worst food choices, really. I am still working on cooking/making foods available that are not that high calorie but I can eat enough of not to feel hungry again before dinner. The only recipe I know of right now is 3 bean salad. It's totally yum and almost fat free, really. Need some more...

Anyway, yay to all of us who love to cook and love to eat! ;) :hug: I would love to bake all the cakes and make all the dishes I want to, but I have the same problem. Can't make it without eating it and I can't afford the possibility of ending up with a disease later on in life. I hope I can control myself enough to recognize "normal" portions. That's my goal for now.

maegdaeien
04-09-2007, 08:32 PM
I definitely love to eat too. In my family, food is everything: we all are great cooks and we make the most of it! Food = comfort, food = love, food = an excuse to get together, etc. and that's a hard habit to break. I live far from home now, but even so every weekend I'd order Chinese or pizza and eat until I felt very physically uncomfortable; I guess a full stomach can make you feel like you're "complete" sometimes.

I'm a calorie counter too, which means that I can still have those great meals so long as I make sure the total calories still even out to a healthy level over the week. If I know I'll be eating a lot one day, I plan ahead and cut back for a while.

BlueToBlue
04-09-2007, 10:10 PM
I also love to cook and spend a lot of time looking for recipes. I spend almost one entire day per week planning meals and shopping for groceries, including an early morning trip to the farmers' market. I still spend as much time researching recipes, planning, and preparing food as I did before I was controlling my calories (possibly even more), it's just that now my energy goes into finding healthy alternatives. I feel like this has been a really important part of my growth; it's taught me to make healthy choices that I like to eat, which is critical to long-term maintenance.

And I agree with Alinnell that Cooking Light is fantastic. I cancelled my subscription to Everyday Foods and replaced it with Cooking Light and I've been thrilled with the decision (I do still have my subscriptions to MS Living and Sunset Magazine, though). It's pretty rare that a recipe I make from Cooking Light tastes low calorie to me. My SO has commented to me that one advantage to my new diet has been all these new recipes I've found that he really likes. He doesn't even realize they are low calorie.

Today for lunch I had a salmon stuffed with dill, cheese, and bay shrimp from Trader Joe's, fresh roasted asparagus and leeks from the farmers' market, and a baby spinach and strawberry salad (also from the farmers' market). Tonight for dinner we are having chicken in Adobo sauce with leeks (a recipe I got from Sunset Magazine) and wild rice. Last night, we had fresh tilapia with mint chutney (both from the farmers' market), and baked sweet potatoes, also from the farmers market. All of this food tastes divine; nothing seems low calorie or like I am giving up anything. It's food I would choose to eat even if I weren't trying to control my calories. And there's no reason why low calorie food can't be elaborate; I tend to look for things that are easy to prepare, but I have made more elaborate dishes that have come out great.

As far as portions go, if I make something that is four servings (the chicken in Adobo sauce, for example), as soon as I am done making it, I divide it in half and put half of that (1/4 of the total dish) on my plate and the other half on my SO's plate. The remaining half goes in a tupperware container so we can eat it tomorrow. Everything is portioned out so I don't have to worry about eating more than one serving. If that doesn't work for you, then make dishes that are just one serving (if it is just you) or two servings (if it is you and your SO--you wouldn't eat your SO's dinner, would you?) For example, I bought enough of the farmers' market tilapia for two nights but fish doesn't reheat so well (and it's super easy to cook, anyway), so I just cooked two servings of it last night. That was two fillets: one went on my plate and one went on my SO's plate--there was no question of eating more because there wasn't anymore.

cajungal328
04-09-2007, 11:12 PM
Cary,
I know how you feel. I live in South Louisiana, Cajun Country, and I am accustomed to cooking and eating rich flavorful cajun foods, which are very fattening. We are people whose whole lives pretty much revolve around food, and we take pride in our unique dishes. We also have alot of really fat people here.

I find myself, these days, altering the dishes that I was accustomed to cooking before, to make them more healthy in any way that I can. Like, for example, using a low fat margarine instead of regular margarine or butter, using a leaner cut of meat, cooking alot more dishes with chicken, which is a very lean meat with hundreds of possibilities, rather than beef and pork, which are more fattening and calorie rich meats. Now, I cook brown rice rather than white, eat wheat bread instead of white, and wheat pasta instead of regular. I cut corners whenever and wherever I can, but I still use the same spices and things to add as much flavor as the dishes had before alteration. I like to experiment with different foods, and man, you can play around with food forever.... You can totally change a recipe to make it healthy, and have it taste the same or better than it originally did, or turn it into something completely different, just use your imagination. The possibilities are endless.

Also, if you cook something rich, it doesn't mean you can't have any. Just eat it in moderation and work it into your daily calorie count. Thats what I do.

You seem like a person who is passionate and creative with food, yet you say you cannot cook heathy, and I don't understand why you can't? You love food and you love to cook, you have an open interest and creativity where cooking is concerned, yet you are willing to settle (and make your DH settle) for disgusting TV dinners and Lean Cuisines? This makes no sense to me. You can love food, love to eat food, and still eat healthy without losing flavor, as spices usually have little to no calories... Why should you have to sacrifice something you really love in an effort to lose weight? Alteration and moderation is the key....

veggielover
04-09-2007, 11:15 PM
I love food; it's something I really enjoy. Having that said, I never overdo it because too much spoils a good thing. I used to stuff myself silly, now I eat just enough to feel "not-hungry" any more; many times I will be hungry later and I will feed myself then, as well! I basically eat whenever I need to, enjoy whenever I can, am wise to eat things that make me feel better, moderate things that my be bad in large quantities, and have goodies whenever I feel I should.

veggielover
04-09-2007, 11:17 PM
Cary,
I know how you feel. I live in South Louisiana, Cajun Country, and I am accustomed to cooking and eating rich flavorful cajun foods, which are very fattening. We are people whose whole lives pretty much revolve around food, and we take pride in our unique dishes. We also have alot of really fat people here.

I've tried some really fattening southern louisiana traditionals. I must say, you guys really know how to work an appetie- I love the foods. So much that I only have a tiny helping of the richness!

JayEll
04-10-2007, 12:02 AM
Jay,
you are living my dream..
but to be able to smell food and not feel like you have to eat it (some type of food I love) is beyond me.. I think it would actually be physically painful!

Cary

It was a realization one day--I think I was out for a walk and someone was cooking bacon and the smell was on the air--and of course I thought about how I couldn't just run into their house and steal their bacon!!!!!! But seriously, it was a sudden shift in attitude--to enjoying just the smell--and letting it go at that, knowing I could smell it all I wanted... It makes a big difference...

Sort of like perfume or flower scents... You don't want to go and bite a carnation just because it smells lovely...

Jay

rockinrobin
04-10-2007, 08:18 AM
I too love, love, love food. Yup, there I said it. Funny thing is I love it waaay more now at 168 lbs then I did when I was 287. Back then I ate everything and anything I wanted. And apparently I wanted A LOT. Now, I count calories and am grateful for every little bite that goes in my mouth. I savor and enjoy each and every bite. I was kind of like the spoiled kid with too many toys - he's got so many, he appreciates none of them. Well now I appreciate everything.

I enjoy planning my meals and making myself good, tasty healthy food. I have found great recipes that I really and truly love. I could never, ever in a million years stay on plan if I didn't love and adore everything that I was eating. I think that is really, really key. You must find foods that you enjoy.

I had to set myself up a schedule as to when I could eat. This helps to elminate the "emotional" eating aspect for me. I can no longer eat just because I'm bored, frustrated, lonely, angry or happy. That was a big thing I needed to change.

healthytoad
04-10-2007, 09:24 AM
I just made the chocolate suffle from the latest cooking light this weekend. It was wonderful and only 80 calories! One of our favorites is peanut curried shrimp..amazing, you would never know it was good for you ;)

Runundefined
04-10-2007, 10:40 AM
Wow.. I got up this morning and came to find this thread is really moving! I read each and every one..

Barbara.. you sound like you KNOW your way around a kitchen honey. I hope to some day be that way again.. I used to do exactly that.. spend my entire Sunday - typing up my menu for the week, putting all my menus and recipes in a folder for the week.. making a list and then I would shop at two to four different places that day.. it was like a 6 hour ordeal. but I LOVED it! we had a great wine and cheese shop I would go to and a wonderful gourmet shop. also a wild oats and a normal Publix grocery store.

I just found that this kept my entire mentality on nothing but food, all the time.. all day long.

Did you begin your diet this way? or was it a slow process?

For me I just feel like I have to switch off the constant desire for food.. and the quick (albeit boring most of the time) frozen stuff requires much less mental energy!

I KNOW I can't eat like this forever.. I am sure It will morph into a mixture of this and cooking days.. I am just not there yet..

Heather!
OMG.. we LOVE and have learned to cook several Cajun recipes.. I have a gumbo recipe that takes an entire day.. and I LOVE just good old Cajun shrimp and rice.. AND Jambalaya – my husband’s VERY favorite.. I have this “soaked salad” recipe I got from a restaurant in New Orleans that is SO good (and so fattening)… I think it is just, like I mentioned above, that I have such a LOVE for food that it was taking up way to much of my time. I am having luck with the weight loss right now and I think I am afraid to switch gears!

Jay..
Yea.. you KNOW many flowers are edible!!!

I think I will stay on my lackluster – frozen food diet another couple of weeks (or until I reach my next goal – only four pounds to go for this) and then slowly add a day or two a week of dinners I will cook.. I have to start slow! I think I am just afraid… because this is working right now..

Thank you each of you.. this has made me feel very good today already!
Cary

healthytoad
04-10-2007, 10:46 AM
Individual Chocolate Soufflé Cakes
From Cooking Light


To serve four, use five teaspoons flour and double the remaining ingredients. Doubling the flour would make the base too heavy.

Cooking spray
4 1/2 tablespoons granulated sugar, divided
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1 1/2 tablespoons Dutch process cocoa
2 tablespoons fat-free milk
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 large egg white
1 teaspoon powdered sugar

Preheat oven to 350°.
Coat 2 (6-ounce) ramekins with cooking spray; sprinkle each with 3/4 teaspoon granulated sugar.

Combine 2 tablespoons granulated sugar, flour, cocoa, and milk in a small saucepan over medium heat. Cook 2 minutes, stirring until smooth. Spoon chocolate mixture into a medium bowl; cool 4 minutes. Stir in vanilla.

Place egg white in a medium bowl; beat with a mixer at high speed until soft peaks form. Add remaining 2 tablespoons granulated sugar, 1 teaspoon at a time, beating until stiff peaks form (do not overbeat). Gently stir 1/4 of egg white mixture into chocolate mixture; gently fold in remaining egg white mixture. Spoon mixture into prepared dishes. Sharply tap dishes 2 or 3 times to level. Place dishes on a baking sheet; bake at 350° for 15 minutes or until puffy and set. Sprinkle each soufflé with 1/2 teaspoon powdered sugar. Serve immediately.

Yield: 2 servings (serving size: 1 soufflé)

NUTRITION PER SERVING
CALORIES 79(7% from fat); FAT 0.6g (sat 0.3g,mono 0.2g,poly 0.0g); PROTEIN 3.5g; CHOLESTEROL 0.0mg; CALCIUM 26mg; SODIUM 35mg; FIBER 1.4g; IRON 0.8mg; CARBOHYDRATE 16.5g

Marcia Whyte Smart

healthytoad
04-10-2007, 10:46 AM
Don't forget to check out their website. I love that the recipes have reader reviews there.

Runundefined
04-10-2007, 10:48 AM
EJM!

thank you!
I am printing this right now..
sounds very interesting.. and I LOVE that this only is for two.. no way to walk to the fridge in the middle of the night and scarf down the last two!

Thanks again,
Cary

Runundefined
04-10-2007, 10:59 AM
You know something else I think would be the perfect finish to the Souffle recipe...

I have as my "treat" every day around 4pm a homemade cappuccino.. I use skim milk and this great hand held frother to make very thick "whipped cream" that I put on top.. this is something that would be VERY good on top of the souffle and only add about 10 calories..

you take a tall glass (ice tea size) pour 1/4 cup (enough for two) of skim milk in and use the frother to whip the cold milk (mine looks just like this:)
http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y226/CaryMartin/frother.jpg
you can find them on line..
the milk whips up allot - like about four -five times in volume. (it is interesting.. the skim milk whips up much more than the full fat milk).. you then put it in the micro for about 25sec (watch it as the foam starts to really rise.. I have to do several 10 second times) - I just watch it and when the foam gets almost to the top -stop the microwave and let it rest down a little and heat a few more seconds.. repeat until you have 25-30 sec..
something about the microwave makes the whipped milk much more dense.. like a meringue consistancy.. it is the perfect topping for LOTs of things from fresh strawberries to coffee.. sometimes I add a teasppon full of one of my Divinci sugar free flavors before I whip it..
you should try it..
thanks again for the recipe!
Cary

BlueToBlue
04-11-2007, 02:40 AM
Barbara.. you sound like you KNOW your way around a kitchen honey. I hope to some day be that way again.. I used to do exactly that.. spend my entire Sunday - typing up my menu for the week, putting all my menus and recipes in a folder for the week.. making a list and then I would shop at two to four different places that day.. it was like a 6 hour ordeal. but I LOVED it! we had a great wine and cheese shop I would go to and a wonderful gourmet shop. also a wild oats and a normal Publix grocery store.

I just found that this kept my entire mentality on nothing but food, all the time.. all day long.

Did you begin your diet this way? or was it a slow process?


I started this way. By the time I started dieting, I was already into cooking. I already did meal planning on the weekends and shopped at both Trader Joe's and Safeway on most weekends. I first starting doing it when my SO and I moved in together. At first, I considered it a chore but eventually I began to enjoy it and started subscribing to cooking magazines (although I've never typed up a menu, I just set the recipes aside). After I started trying to control my weight, meal planning became even more important. I had to do it to survive on my calorie plan. I don't know how you manage on Lean Cuisines, et. al. I definitely rely on convenience meals (frozen or vacuum-sealed) for lunch a couple of times a week, but for dinner we almost always have something homemade. Most frozen meals are not satisfying enough for me; I rarely even eat them for lunch (my convenience meals are usually seafood, Indian meals, or tuna, along with brown rice all from Trader Joe's). If I ate LC's, etc., for dinner, I wouldn't be able to make it to bedtime without needing to eat more.

I didn't add the weekly trip to the farmers' market to my grocery day until after I started my diet and good quality fresh produce became critical. I swear, fruits and veggies taste better to me now than they did before. My biggest complaint is that we don't have any gourmet grocery stores within easy driving distance, so unfortunately I don't get to shop at those venues. I would love to have a Whole Foods.

I do think a lot about food. Not every minute of the day, but quite a lot. But I like it, so it doesn't bother me. Other people have hobbies that they spend a lot of time on (for my SO, it is a computer game) and people rarely question whether or not these interests are healthy. In my case, one of my hobbies is food.

Both the chocolate souffles and the whipped skim milk (esp. with sugar-free syrup) sound awesome. :T

JayEll
04-11-2007, 07:33 AM
Hey Barbara!

Just a note about those Lean Cuisines. I'm not someone who's into a lot of meal planning and cooking, and LCs tell me exactly what and how much I'm eating. Yeah, there is a certain sameness to it that I get tired of after MONTHS of doing this, but it works for me. Would I rather be eating whole foods and wonderfully prepared meals? Sure! Did I gain weight doing that? Um, yeah. So maintenance is going to be an interesting time for me, and I'll probably have to do more calculating and portion control than I do now.

I do sometimes want a snack in the evening, but often it's because I'm still under 1200 cals for the day.

So my current relationship with food partly has to do with convenience.

Jay

Cheryl14
04-11-2007, 08:24 AM
Another food lover here! :carrot: Most of my fondest memories have been ones when I was cooking with my grandma and my aunt in my grandma's kitchen as a kid. My sons were always interested in cooking and baking, too. Our youngest is eighteen and often makes complete dinners for us and for his girlfriend and her family at their home!

I refuse to quit cooking and baking! First of all, I like the idea of knowing EXACTLY what is in the foods I eat. Secondly, it is A LOT less expensive. Thirdly, and most importantly, I really ENJOY doing it!

Like many of you, I have quite a few cookbooks. Recently my future DIL has been diagnosed with Celiac Disease, so I have been experimenting with various gluten-free flours as I bake. Often I make a sugar-free version AND a gluten-free version. My husband is diabetic. Additional challenges for me are my future DIL and my mom are vegetarians AND my husband and youngest son LOVE meat! I often make two versions of entrees, too, which takes a bit of extra time but is TREMENDOUSLY APPRECIATED by my family with special dietary needs!

Wild Oats Market and Trader Joe's have been INVALUABLE to me as I secure special ingredients to use. I have also been buying organic foods whenever possible.

For me, the trick has been cooking smaller amounts so that I have either just enough for that meal OR just enough for my mom or DIL to take home with them for leftovers. I have some of every food, but I use a dessert plate or fill my plate with more vegetables and have a bigger salad. I never have seconds now! (I USED to have thirds and fourths!!!!:( ) By having some of everything, I find that I don't feel deprived. If I ever feel deprived I can usually expect a binge within the next day or two!

My greatest challenge in baking is when I am anywhere near COOKIE DOUGH! I can't even lick the spoon or I am DONE! I find that if I make a nice cup of strong coffee OR if I go brush my teeth and swish with Listerine, I am OK. Then I can be around cookie dough...but only if I never sample even one bite!

It would be easier for us all if our food addiction would entail something that our body really didn't NEED...like cigarettes or alcohol...but every day we MUST eat food, and we must CONTROL the amount of food we eat. It gets to be EXHAUSTING!!! I'm sure you all have felt/still feel that way!

Sigh!:(

Runundefined
04-11-2007, 02:01 PM
Barbara,
It sounds like you have a much more healthy relationship with food..
I think Jay sort of hit it on the head.. a HUGE part of it is convenience.. My life is a bit overwhelming right now (last year I lost a VERY good job and decided to start my own business)... it's going well but I have a VERY hard time having "real" food in the house all the time as I am working at home. I would go to the store..buy this great food for the week..and eat WAY too much of the good stuff...

I am sure it's not great to be afraid of my food.. but right now this is how I can manage to stay in control.. I DID decide to make a wonderful pasta primavera (I like whole wheat pasta actually and the spring veggies are wondereful right now) for dinner one day this week.. but having no bread is important.. I just can't have it right now..

Thanks so much everyone!
I love it here,
Cary

2Fat4myJeans
04-11-2007, 02:19 PM
In my family, food has always been associated with love. I take after my dad's side of the family and my grandmother LOVES to cook and make those wonderful southern meals. It is how she gets every person to gather at the dining room table and having us all there at one time.

I don't know if anyone has ever read "The Five Love Languages" by Gary Chapman, but one of the love languages talks about receiving gifts and that is how people feel loved and show their love. I have always been a gift giver and food was a big gift. I would spend all this time preparing gourmet meals to show my friends, family and my husband that I loved them. Food was my gift to say "I love you, I have prepared this great meal for you, here is my gift for you!" I love having people over to eat, dinner parties, etc. My husband always jokes that nobody ever needs to bring anything because I'll go overboard with the food anyway! Still, to this day, when I try to think of something nice or romantic to do for my husband, the first thing I always think of is food.

Unfortunately this has also left me very FAT. And when I had my first job out of college, commuting 2 hours a day, it became convenience, too. I was too tired to cook anything when I got home from work, so we ate out a lot. It's funny that the easiest foods to make aren't necessarily the healthiest foods to eat.

Things started to change when my dad was diagnosed with diabetes (not type 2). Every time my parents came to visit, I wanted to cook meals. Well, now I had to modify everything so that it was still tasty but "legal" for a diabetic. I used to love going on allrecipes.com and searching for meals. I hardly ever do that anymore because I have our healthy "staple" meals: chicken and veggies, pork and rice, turkey and potatoes, etc. Tonight we are varying it a bit and having greek lamb pitas. :carrot: I am slowly learning how to modify my favorite fatty meals into healthy ones, but it's been hard and it seems like it takes so much more time and money.

cajungal328
04-11-2007, 03:06 PM
Heather!
OMG.. we LOVE and have learned to cook several Cajun recipes.. I have a gumbo recipe that takes an entire day.. and I LOVE just good old Cajun shrimp and rice.. AND Jambalaya – my husband’s VERY favorite.. I have this “soaked salad” recipe I got from a restaurant in New Orleans that is SO good (and so fattening)… I think it is just, like I mentioned above, that I have such a LOVE for food that it was taking up way to much of my time. I am having luck with the weight loss right now and I think I am afraid to switch gears!




Hey, why would gumbo take a whole day? It only takes me about 2 hours from start to finish, and I make my roux from scratch, I don't use that crap in the jar.... YUK ...

PS... Gumbo, Jambalaya, Etouffee, Sauce Picquante, Boudin, Fried Catfish and Shrimp, Stuffed Shrimp, Crab Casserole.... we make all this stuff...
But, most of us were raised on meat, rice, and gravy... Thats why most of us here are fat...

veggielover
04-11-2007, 04:56 PM
I don't know why, but the individual milk frother (battery operated, non steam) doesn;t cut it for me as well as the steamer frothed milk. The froth doesn't stay too long! :(

lumifan4ever
04-11-2007, 05:31 PM
okay...honestly...I don't really like food that much. Probably because I am bored with the things I cook but I really hate to cook. I'd be happy just making a frozen dinner everyday if I could get away with it. I don't enjoy the effort it takes to look up reciepes, and I dont' have the money to buy alot of herbs to make things taste better. Most days I'm probably lucky if I get 1200 calories because I am really bored with eating. Nothing...even fast food really appeals to me. I never seem to know what I really want. But I must be getting enough calories to break even or else I am not eating enough and my body is hoarding the calories I take in because it thinks I am on a starvation mode. I don't know.

ennay
04-11-2007, 08:20 PM
Barbara - I think a lot of it may be retraining not what your relationship with food is, but what your tastebuds and ideals are for what GOOD food is. I cant STAND high fat, really rich food, it tastes awful to me. Changing your tastebuds can be done! You learn to savor the true flavor of food

I would start slowly. One meal a week find something gourmet but in plan. And go the all out route, but in a different way. Go and pickout a very nice cut of steak or prawns or scallops. Get fresh herbs to cook it with. If the recipe calls for wine, cook with good wine. Pick recipes that call for herbs and spices and get the freshest possible. Focus on the colors and presentation, the aromas, the feel of cooking. Set the table with good tableware and candles.

Savor

Enjoy.

Overtime you may find that gourmet does not have to mean high calorie, and healthy doesnt have to mean boring.

mmmmm off to make my grilled Salmon with balsamic mustard vinaigrette, roasted cabbage with asian black bean sauce, carmelized onion and sweetpotatoes and spring green salad with slivered almonds and freshly grated parmesan.

Runundefined
04-11-2007, 08:54 PM
mmmmm off to make my grilled Salmon with balsamic mustard vinaigrette, roasted cabbage with asian black bean sauce, carmelized onion and sweetpotatoes and spring green salad with slivered almonds and freshly grated parmesan.


OMG... I think this sounds just wonderful...

BlueToBlue
04-11-2007, 11:08 PM
Barbara - I think a lot of it may be retraining not what your relationship with food is, but what your tastebuds and ideals are for what GOOD food is. I cant STAND high fat, really rich food, it tastes awful to me. Changing your tastebuds can be done!

Oh I definitely still like the high fat, rich foods. It's just that I've found many low fat, low calorie recipes I like as well. I've definitely made recipes that came out tasting low calorie (not usually from Cooking Light, but I have several other sources and some of them aren't as dependable); when that happens, we finish off that batch but I don't make the recipe again. You win some, you lose some.

Sorry, if what I said about frozen meals came out wrong. I'm not trying to criticize anyone for eating Lean Cuisines or other frozen meals. I definitely have them occasionally myself for lunch, especially the panini sandwiches. I did try some of the spa cuinsines recently though and they left me really hungry. Not "I need a snack" hungry, but "did I forget to eat lunch?" hungry. And I was not low on my calories so I didn't actually have room in my plan to eat anything else. It was pretty miserable :mad:. I do have better luck with the Ethnic Gourmet entres.

ennay
04-12-2007, 01:52 AM
OMG... I think this sounds just wonderful...

It was really good. ds was not cooperative so I skipped the sweet potatoes and made couscous pilaf instead. Actually think that went better anyway, I think the sweet potatoes would have been too much with that particular marinade on the salmon - too overwhelming. I'll save the sp's for something like pork or steak.

There is LOTS of gourmet healthy food. You just have to look for it.

And since you do like to cook, approach it like learning new techniques and new recipes...isn't that half the fun?

Runundefined
04-12-2007, 08:10 AM
Barbara,
I LOVE the Amy's organics meals... they do a great veggie lasagna, very tasty Indian one (can't think of the meal right now) and I LOVE their Enchilada casserole.. all are veggie and under 400 cal....

I also love the Pannini by Lean Cuisine and Chicken Margarita by Healthy Choice.

I found an old recipe from my veggie days that I love.. it's a black bean salad.. Now I use black soy beans and add fresh cilantro (that I grow), jalapeno, tomato, lime juice, chick peas, finely chopped red bell, a small amt. of corn, chopped red onion, chopped cucumber, garlic salt, lemon pepper and cumin. (I think this is everything.. this is off the top of my head).. I am making it for lunch today.. I think i am going to see how it freezes (well I KNOW I am as I am going to put it in 1C containers RIGHT AWAY and put the rest in the freezer. DH and I will have it again for lunch tomorrow..
See! I am motivated... BUT.. this is my one meal for the week.. Next week I think I will try some Pasta Primavera... DreamField's pasta is pretty good and when I was on LC it didn't take me out of ketosis at all so I know it is very LC.. I have a stash of it from my LC days..

Ennay..
Do you like Quinoa?
I used to make a mean Quinoa pilaf.. and it has protein (Quoina).
Your meal sounded wonderful.... thank you very much for sharing..

Barbara.. what did you make for dinner last nite?
Patrick and I had Boston Market chicken breast, mixed veggies (they use too much butter) and a side salad.

Have a great day!!
Cary

ennay
04-12-2007, 01:12 PM
I do like Quinoa, but dh doesnt so I dont make it often. After being on SB for quite awhile, my idea of an ideal portion of starch is pretty small, so I make small portions of the good starches that dh likes - ww couscous, brown rice, barilla pasta, sweet potatoes etc. I no longer crave huge plates of pasta.

Runundefined
04-12-2007, 01:15 PM
I am a pasta fanatic.. Italian probably is my very fav.. I also love French food.. and make a mean Coq au Vin..

I have not had a sweet potato in ages..
that is going on my list!

Have a great day Ennay...
Cary

BlueToBlue
04-30-2007, 04:39 AM
Individual Chocolate Soufflé Cakes
From Cooking Light


To serve four, use five teaspoons flour and double the remaining ingredients. Doubling the flour would make the base too heavy.

Cooking spray
4 1/2 tablespoons granulated sugar, divided
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1 1/2 tablespoons Dutch process cocoa
2 tablespoons fat-free milk
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 large egg white
1 teaspoon powdered sugar

Preheat oven to 350°.
Coat 2 (6-ounce) ramekins with cooking spray; sprinkle each with 3/4 teaspoon granulated sugar.

Combine 2 tablespoons granulated sugar, flour, cocoa, and milk in a small saucepan over medium heat. Cook 2 minutes, stirring until smooth. Spoon chocolate mixture into a medium bowl; cool 4 minutes. Stir in vanilla.

Place egg white in a medium bowl; beat with a mixer at high speed until soft peaks form. Add remaining 2 tablespoons granulated sugar, 1 teaspoon at a time, beating until stiff peaks form (do not overbeat). Gently stir 1/4 of egg white mixture into chocolate mixture; gently fold in remaining egg white mixture. Spoon mixture into prepared dishes. Sharply tap dishes 2 or 3 times to level. Place dishes on a baking sheet; bake at 350° for 15 minutes or until puffy and set. Sprinkle each soufflé with 1/2 teaspoon powdered sugar. Serve immediately.

Yield: 2 servings (serving size: 1 soufflé)

NUTRITION PER SERVING
CALORIES 79(7% from fat); FAT 0.6g (sat 0.3g,mono 0.2g,poly 0.0g); PROTEIN 3.5g; CHOLESTEROL 0.0mg; CALCIUM 26mg; SODIUM 35mg; FIBER 1.4g; IRON 0.8mg; CARBOHYDRATE 16.5g

Marcia Whyte Smart

I made these tonight and they came out great, but I recalculated the calories just to make sure they were correct (it tasted too good to be just 80 calories). It turns out that the calorie info is a misprint (which is a real bummer because I was pretty stoked to find this recipe). The calories more like 190 per serving. The Cooking Light website lists the calories as 150 for the same recipe, but I'm not sure how they get them so low unless somehow their cocoa and/or is a lot lower in calories than mine. I thought you all might want to know.

imworthit
04-30-2007, 09:06 AM
mine is a love hate relationship i love food but hate the way i look

mamaplots
05-01-2007, 01:35 AM
I love to cook also, and I love to eat what I cook, even if it's not great for you. I'm having a hard time finding recipes that sound tasty that are healthy. And another downfall, I love baking. Cookies, bread. All the stuff that you're really not supposed to have a lot of. Ugh.
I'm an emotional eater, I eat when I'm bored, lonely, stressed, sad, etc. and it's been really hard not to turn to food when it happens.

Flying Betty
05-01-2007, 01:47 AM
I love sugar. It's my huge weakness. I've (mostly) managed to get over the emotional aspect but there's still an underlying sugar addiction. Once I start eating refined carbs I don't stop. Luckily if I can force myself to avoid them for a while I get better at not having them at all.

Aside from that I'm moderately indifferent to food. I don't need very much food and I didn't like most of the things my parents prepared growing up so I didn't care too much about mealtimes. (Try eating standard American cooking if you don't like meat, potatoes, or onions.) I'm not sure I feel better when I eat healthily, but I do feel better about myself which makes a huge difference.