Weight Loss Support - Help - my nutritionist is confusing me...




lovinlifex2
02-16-2007, 12:28 PM
I had my first meeting with a nutritionist last week and I am more confused now than ever. We weighed in talked about all about my eating/exercise habits and after all that she suggested a 1200 calorie diet - even though I do exercise 40 min a day 5 days a week. I told her I thought that sounded a bit low with my current weight and exercise and she seemed a little annoyed and said that it should be fine if I was eating the "right" kinds of foods.

Does anyone else think that seems kind of low?

It seems to contradict everything that I have read here the last year. I have tried it the last week and yes I have lost almost 6 lbs, but I am starving most of the time even though I feel like I am eating wholesome healthy foods.

I know that everyone says listen to your own body, but it is hard for me to figure out what to eat and when to eat it so that is why I decided to see her in the first place. I thougth maybe she could give me some guidance, but now I don't know what to think. :?:

Please help me....


aphil
02-16-2007, 12:34 PM
If you can lose successfully on 1400-1600 calories, then I would recommend it instead. The thing is, if you go to 1200 now...when you are 30 or 40 pounds lighter and close to goal and need to drop then you don't have much to drop it to without starving.

I wonder why she recommended starting out so low...
:?:

rockinrobin
02-16-2007, 12:37 PM
If you are starving then by all means raise your calories. I would try adding another 200 calories, if that doesn't satisfy you I would raise it another 100 and then another 100 if need be and so on. It's a lot of trial and error. You need to find the right mix of calorie intake, your satisfaction level and whether or not you are losing.

I do find protein and fiber keeps me satisfied more then other foods. I'm not sure what you were eating. I also eat 3 meals and 2 or 3 snacks a day every 2 or 3 hours, so that I never get hungry. Experiment and see what works best for you.


lovinlifex2
02-16-2007, 01:29 PM
Thanks for the input. I don't know why she suggested to start out so low - I thought it sounded way to low too. I think I am gonna try and do around 1400-1600 calories for now and see how it goes. I doubt I will be seeing her again. I kinda feel like I wasted my $95, but you live and learn right.

Thanks again!

aphil
02-16-2007, 01:33 PM
A really good friend of mine is a dietician, and she would have never started someone that low, unless they only needed to lose 10-20 pounds.

cbmare
02-16-2007, 01:37 PM
Thanks for the input. I don't know why she suggested to start out so low - I thought it sounded way to low too. I think I am gonna try and do around 1400-1600 calories for now and see how it goes. I doubt I will be seeing her again. I kinda feel like I wasted my $95, but you live and learn right.

Thanks again!

Do they all cost that much? Is that for 1 session or multiple? It it's multiple, then increase your calories and go back in for the session. If you've lost weight, then great and you can tell what you've done and ask that it be reconfigured for your needs. That's the way it should have been in the first place.

ITA with the others that 1200 is too low. Some of you, please correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems to me that 1200 seems to be a "catch-all" for many nutritionists. They don't want you to go below that but just seem to think that 1200 is all the human body needs.

Good luck with your task here. I just think you should be looking in the 1600 range and see what you lose without hunger.

phantastica
02-16-2007, 01:45 PM
Thanks for the input. I don't know why she suggested to start out so low - I thought it sounded way to low too. I think I am gonna try and do around 1400-1600 calories for now and see how it goes. I doubt I will be seeing her again. I kinda feel like I wasted my $95, but you live and learn right.

Thanks again!

I'd call the nutritionist and express your concerns about the contradiction, see what he/she says. You paid for information, not confusion.

Whittlin
02-16-2007, 01:54 PM
Consider a second opinion. That's what we would do with a physician, so why shouldn't we do it with a nutritionist? If you did get a second opinion, I wouldn't tell the second person anything about the first's recommendations. I would take notes, then go home and have a quiet time with both person's suggestions and make my own decisions.

I think 1,200 calories sounds inappropriate for you.

JayEll
02-16-2007, 01:56 PM
If the nutritionist did any metabolism testing on you, it might be because of that. I exercise 6 days out of 7, and if I eat 1500 cals I will not lose. I have to keep it under 1300, and the closer to 1200 the better. That's just me--I've been sedentary for years and I have slow metabolism, plus I'm an older woman.

Definitely ASK the nutritionist why she recommended 1200. Anything else is just speculation.

Just for information: Even on FitDay, my calorie goal to lose 1.2 pounds a week is 1269 cals eaten, with burning 1877 cals a day. My daily average over the past 11 weeks has been 1350 cals in (okay, a little higher than I said above. Darn!), 2000 cals out with exercise, which comes close to the 650 difference needed to drop 1.2 pounds per week. And, as of today, I've dropped from 186 to 173 during that time, which is--surprise! 1.2 pounds per week.

So maybe your nutritionist was aiming for a 2 pound per week loss for you? Dunno.

Jay

GatorgalstuckinGA
02-16-2007, 02:11 PM
It seems a bit low to me too. I'm currently loosing 1-2 /bs a week eating 1500 cals a day. I would suggest getting a second opinion.

Beach Patrol
02-16-2007, 02:15 PM
Why did you see a nutritionist in the first place? They can help you with "nutrition" - but if dieting =weight loss is what you're after, you should see a dietician.

BIG DIFFERENCE. :)

lovinlifex2
02-16-2007, 02:31 PM
cbmare - The $95 was for 1 hour long introductory session only. If I choose to go back then the cost is $75 for each addititional hour long session or $45 for a 30 min session.

JayEll - No she didn't do any metabolic testing. Just took my weight and measurements and then we talked about eating/exercise plans both past and present. So I really don't know about my metabolism. I am 28 and used to be very active in high school volleyball, cheerleading, swim team. Then I got married - had 2 kids (ages now 8 and 6) - and got divorced. I never had a big problem with my weight until after my second child - now it doesn't want to seem to leave and she is 6!

I did express my concern to her that 1200 calories seemed low to me and she did appear very annoyed and said that if i was eating the "right" foods that 1200 calories should be plenty.

Beach Patrol - I was having some issues with my blood pressure and so my doctor suggested that I see her. He is actually the one that referred me to her office. Maybe that is where the breakdown is, I should be seeing a dietician instead of a nutritionist. I may explore that avenue for my second opinion.

Thanks all!

cbmare
02-16-2007, 02:34 PM
Why did you see a nutritionist in the first place? They can help you with "nutrition" - but if dieting =weight loss is what you're after, you should see a dietician.

BIG DIFFERENCE. :)

OK. I guess I'm stupid. I thought those names were interchangable for the same job.

What's the difference?

phantastica
02-16-2007, 02:43 PM
What's the difference?

I didn't know there was a difference, either.

lovinlifex2
02-16-2007, 02:49 PM
I wasn't sure what the difference was either and so I went looking and this is what I found:

"A dietitian (sometimes spelled dietician) is an expert in food and nutrition. Dietitians help promote good health through proper eating. They also supervise the preparation and service of food, develop modified diets, participate in research, and educate individuals and groups on good nutritional habits. The goals of the dietary department are to obtain, prepare, and serve flavorsome, attractive, and nutritious food to patients, family members, and health care providers.

In the US nutrition professionals include the registered dietitian (RD) and the dietetic technician, registered (DTR). Some RDs or DTRs call themselves nutritionists. However, some people who may call themselves a nutritionist are not registered dietitians. Dietetic technicians are not the same as dietitians in terms of responsibilities and qualifications. Different professional terms are used in other countries."

Is all seems kind of confusing to me. It seems that they may be one in the same, but I am not sure.

JayEll
02-16-2007, 05:03 PM
I think what that definition is saying is that a dietitian can be a nutritionist, but a nutritionist might not be a dietitian (i.e. registered, certified, etc.). Just like a doctor is a health practitioner, but not all health practitioners are doctors.

Jay

rockinrobin
02-16-2007, 05:33 PM
I think they aim to provide mostly the same functions. The difference I believe is their degrees and the amount of education they had to recieve in order to become registered.

There are good dieticians and bad dieticians. There are bad nutritionists and good nutritionists. Just like doctors and plumbers.

almostheaven
02-16-2007, 06:46 PM
A nutritionist is to a dietician like a chiropractor is to a medical doctor. A dietician IS a nutrition expert...ie: nutritionist. However, some people can study nutrition and CALL themselves a nutritionist, but they canNOT call themselves a dietician unless they get the license to do so. A chiropractor will call themself a doctor of chiropractic medicine, which doesn't require medical school like regular medical doctors have to go to. It's also part of all the controversy against chiropractic care. I've had good and bad chiros. They're not as regulated as an M.D. would be. And nutritionists would be in the same category. You can get good and bad ones. Some may be just as good as a licensed dietician, but they just never bothered with getting that license. Others though could give you really bad advice and get by with it because they're not as regulated.

JayEll
02-16-2007, 08:40 PM
I think doctors of chiropractic do go through a rather extensive schooling, although, as you say, not the same as medical school.

By the way, licensed practitioners in any field can be good or bad. It really is "buyer beware" for everything, regardless of what letters are after the name...

Jay

MicheleKC
02-16-2007, 11:45 PM
but I am starving most of the time even though I feel like I am eating wholesome healthy foods.

You can find online calculators that determine your daily energy expenditures and then how much calories you burn from exercise, and based on your current weight and your goal weight, how much of a calorie deficit you need to lose weight.

I usually eat around 1200 calories a day and I don't feel "starving" except right before I eat. What I'm trying to suggest is that, I think it's not necessarily a good thing to always feel "full" throughout the day and that the starving feeling means you're eating when you're hungry. I usually space out the calories and eat about 6x a day at around 200 calories.

Another example, a lot of people skip breakfast because they still feel full from the night before. When I wake up in the morning, after sleeping nearly 7 to 8 hours, I feel "starving" or hungry for food. Doesn't it seem more normal that after nearly 8 hours you would feel hungry for breakfast instead of still full from whatever was consumed the previous night?

Heather
02-17-2007, 01:36 AM
I usually eat around 1200 calories a day and I don't feel "starving"

Don't forget, the original poster weighs a lot more than you do, and people who weigh more burn more calories for everything they do.

I'm not trying to say that she should eat more or not, but you have to be careful when comparing what you do to what other people do. Someone who weighs 120 pounds will, in general, be satisfied on fewer calories than someone who weighs 220, all other factors being equal (which they may not be... I know... :) )Also, those online calculators are estimates, at best. They provide guidelines but are not accurate for all people.

Finally, back to the concepts of nutritionists vs dieticians -- you do need licensing to call yourself a dietician, but not a nutritionist. That's not to say nutritionists are bad and dieticians good, but there are greater levels of certification to be a dietician.

MicheleKC
02-17-2007, 11:20 AM
Someone who weighs 120 pounds will, in general, be satisfied on fewer calories than someone who weighs 220, all other factors being equal (which they may not be... I know... :)

That may be true. My point was, I don't feel "full" and satisfied throughout the entire day. I'm used to feeling very hungry right before I eat. (That's why I had a problem with drive-thru and had to curb it.) The saying "my eyes are bigger than my stomach" applies to me. I think that I am much hungrier than I actually am once I start eating.

If the OP isn't used to knowing when and what and how much to eat, maybe the "hunger" sensation is new to her and she feels like she's starving. Some people eat for emotional reasons instead of when they're hungry. Maybe it takes some getting used to when your body is telling you that you are full or hungry, or just knowing that the food is there and you won't actually starve.

The other point is calories burned from exercise. She may not be burning as many calories from the additional exercise as she thinks. A lot of people eat more when they start exercising because they think they're burning a lot more calories.

If she starts consuming 100, 200, 300+ more calories than what the nutrionist recommended, which some people here suggested, those calories should still be nutritious. It just sounds like she might blow her weight loss progress if she starts eating more without giving this current program a chance. She did indicate that she's losing weight.

Mami
02-17-2007, 12:48 PM
I think its a horrible feeling to be hungry. Sometimes I try to overcome the feeling late at night when its time for bed, but otherwise I just feel I must eat when hunger calls (otherwise I get cranky and a bit loony). I have a large appetite so to lose I do need to eat little enough for me (about 1700 calories) to lose steadily and I am definitely hungry at that number. However, I would question my goal weight if it entailed me living the rest of my life in hunger just to get and stay that low.

Angihas2
02-17-2007, 01:21 PM
I think in this case, take the good and ignore the bad. Hopefully, she gave you a list of "healthier" food, base your diet or eating habits off of those. I find that veggies are the base of my way of eating, the rawer the better. I build off of a plate of raw veggies, then add in the extras, be it grains, meat or a combo of both. I tried sticking to 1200 calories, my family begged me to eat more, the mood swings and forays into the kitchen to stare at what I "can't eat" became overwhelming. I upped it to 1400 for 2 weeks, and while the feelings of hunger were still there, the craving for the crap food lessened. I've upped it for this week to the 1600 range and so far that is working MUCH better for me. I've stalled in wieght loss for the last 6 weeks, so tweaking a "standard plan" is what's working for me. According to the scale, I lost 3 pounds this week, official weigh in day isn't until Monday though. I personally, don't think that starting at 1200 and working your way up from there is bad. Person A, who weighs in at 150 lbs, and lifts weights 5 times a week needs way more calories than I do. Person B who weighs in at 350 pounds, but has NO activity other than the ones in which to live, needs more calories than I do, simply because their body needs more to live and function. I say play with it and find what works for you, and remember, just because you start at 1200 doesn't mean you're stuck there forever. It's just a starting place, try it for a week, then adjust it, 100-200 calories at a time, until you find the spot in which you feel satisfied, notice not full, but satisfied with your meal and where you can go 3-4 hours before needing fuel again. I do 3 meals of 400-500 calories a meal with 2 snacks in the 100-200 calories range, which doesn't seem like much, but again, my meals are veggie based, so thats a whole bunch of broccoli, squash, carrots etc, drizzled very lightly with a teaspoon of olive oil and stir-fried or steamed quickly. Good luck!

Beach Patrol
02-17-2007, 07:01 PM
Ok - for the record...

"Diet Doctor" - An MD who is certified by the American Board of Bariatric Medicine & trained to spot medical causes of weight gain. Try a diet doctor if you're overweight enough that your waist size is bigger than your bra size.

"Registered Dietitian" - an "RD" who has a bachelor's degree in nutrition or science who's passed a national certifying exam. Try an RD if you are confused about what kind of eating plan to follow.

"Weight-Loss Psychologist" - Someone with a PhD in clincial psychology who specializes in eating disorders & weight control. Try one if you know what you're supposed to do to lose weight but just can't seem to make yourself do it. A WLP will help you get to the root of your food issues & figure out if you're eating because you're bored, depressed, angry, stressed, etc.

"Weight Loss Coach" - Anyone one calls themselves a weight loss coach. But the best are certified by the International Coaching Federation, which requires at least 125 hours of training and a final exam. See a WLC if you need a kick in the pants to put down the Fritos & Diet Pepsi and get your butt off the sofa.

"Nutritionist" - Requires a bachelorís degree with a major in dietetics, food and nutrition, food service systems management, or a related subject is the basic requirement of this profession. Courses in the sciences, such as biology,microbiology, mathematics, statistics, psychology, and sociology are core course requirements.

Dietitians manage food service systems for institutions such as hospitals and schools, promote sound eating habits through education, and conduct research. Major areas of practice include clinical, community, management, and consultant dietetics.

Clinical dietitians provide nutritional services for patients in institutions such as hospitals and nursing care facilities. They assess patientsí nutritional needs, develop and implement nutrition programs, and evaluate and report the results. They also confer with doctors and other health care professionals to coordinate medical and nutritional needs. Some clinical dietitians specialize in the management of overweight patients or in the care of critically ill or renal (kidney) and diabetic patients. In addition, clinical dietitians in nursing care facilities, small hospitals, or correctional facilities may manage the food service department.

Community dietitians counsel individuals and groups on nutritional practices designed to prevent disease and promote health. Working in places such as public health clinics, home health agencies, and health maintenance organizations, community dietitians evaluate individual needs, develop nutritional care plans, and instruct individuals and their families. Dietitians working in home health agencies provide instruction on grocery shopping and food preparation to the elderly, individuals with special needs, and children.

Increased public interest in nutrition has led to job opportunities in food manufacturing, advertising, and marketing. In these areas, dietitians analyze foods, prepare literature for distribution, or report on issues such as the nutritional content of recipes, dietary fiber, or vitamin supplements.

Management dietitians oversee large-scale meal planning and preparation in health care facilities, company cafeterias, prisons, and schools. They hire, train, and direct other dietitians and food service workers; budget for and purchase food, equipment, and supplies; enforce sanitary and safety regulations; and prepare records and reports.

And last but not least! - Consultant dietitians work under contract with health care facilities or in their own private practice. They perform nutrition screenings for their clients and offer advice on diet-related concerns such as weight loss and cholesterol reduction. Some work for wellness programs, sports teams, supermarkets, and other nutrition-related businesses. They may consult with food service managers, providing expertise in sanitation, safety procedures, menu development, budgeting, and planning.

In general, Nutritionists & Registered Dietitians are bascially the same, but in fact, a little different; altho each can perform nearly the same functions, a Registered Dietitian is a bit more knowledgeable in the weight loss field, from my understanding. I hope this information helps! :D

Beach Patrol
02-17-2007, 07:43 PM
For further info on the difference between Dietitians & Nutritionists:


http://www.dietitians.ca/public/content/career_in_nutrition/difference_dietitian_nutritionist.asp

Heather
02-17-2007, 09:42 PM
Beach Patrol -- Thanks for all that info -- that is VERY helpful!

cantforgetthis
02-19-2007, 02:16 AM
Just as a reminder, regardless of what the designation is, medical or otherwise, these people are not gods. They make mistakes, and don't know everything. Get a second or third opinion if wanted, seek out a number of sources. No one knows your body better than you do and everyone is different. We owe it to ourselves to make sure that we have what we need to make informed decisions about our own lives. :hug:

Oh, and by the way, for another perspective on calories, up until recently, i've been losing on about 1800-1900 calories with just a bit of walking. The loss has slowed now and i'll be taking it down a notch to 1700 to see how that goes. 1200 doesn't have to be a magical number for losing, although a number of the more traditional weightloss programs I had looked into still seem to quote that number across the board for some reason.

aphil
02-19-2007, 08:43 AM
They quote 1200, because it is pretty much the lowest calorie range of "healthy"...as in dieting without starving yourself. Also, because it works with people who have less to lose-while you may currently be at 1700...another 40-50 pounds down, that level will no longer work for you most likely. You will have to up the exercise a bit, and lower the calories a bit.
Diet places know this, so they want someone who is 150 pounds to be able to lose weight if they want to-just like someone who is 250.
So, they use a lower number so that smaller people will be able to lose as well.

It is easier for diet places to tell everyone 1200 (low enough for just about anyone), than have to take a look at their activity level, current weight, and other factors.

MariaOfColumbia
02-19-2007, 11:58 AM
What do you call a person who was last in their class in medical school?
*
*
*
*
*
*
"Doctor"

aphil
02-19-2007, 12:45 PM
This is so true...and so many people take their doctors word for it, no matter what...but it is just like any other profession-an engineer, a lawyer, a hairdresser-you have the top of the class, and those who are the best at what they do, and then you have the ones who passed by a couple of points. ;)

freiamaya
02-19-2007, 01:05 PM
Hey hey HEY!!! I'd like to see some of YOU get even accepted to Med school - the top 0.5% of the academic population is actually eligible to apply, and they select down from there. The academic standing is actually a moot point. There are great diagnosticians who weren't at the "top of the class", and often those at the top have actually NO PATIENT SKILLS whatsoever. Add to this the examination system (is it a practical exam? recitation of memorized material? is it an unbiased exam? is the grading scale on a curve?), and you don't necessarily have a reflection of what makes a good health care practitioner.
This is no different than saying that any nurse who wasn't at the "top of his/her class" provides poor heath care, and I KNOW there are a number of nurses online who would take exception to this.
If any of you think that med school is a breeze, I invite you to apply. And once in, I'd like to see you be at "the top of the class" consistently. And if not, I'd LOVE to hear your opinions as to whether the "top of the class" equates to "best physician". Until then, if you don't like what you hear from your health care practitioner, get a second opinion.
Sorry if this sounds harsh - in my chosen profession, I was not at the top of my class. Those who were were actively cheating during exams (some were caught, some not) or choosing the exams that they would fail in order to write a supplemental exam 3 months later (without detriment to their class standing) or were Mormon in a predominantly Mormon faculty (and thereby "earned" some leeway, which was obvious to those of us who weren't Mormon). Does this make them "better" than me? I doubt it. At least I earned my way honestly. And I stand my by professional skills (20 years of honest, ethical, and successful work). AND I challenge those of you who judge in this manner to take a long look at the successes in your life, and examine how you would feel if your abilities were judged in such a high-handed manner.

aphil
02-19-2007, 02:47 PM
Hey hey HEY!!! I'd like to see some of YOU get even accepted to Med school - the top 0.5% of the academic population is actually eligible to apply, and they select down from there. The academic standing is actually a moot point. There are great diagnosticians who weren't at the "top of the class", and often those at the top have actually NO PATIENT SKILLS whatsoever. Add to this the examination system (is it a practical exam? recitation of memorized material? is it an unbiased exam? is the grading scale on a curve?), and you don't necessarily have a reflection of what makes a good health care practitioner.
This is no different than saying that any nurse who wasn't at the "top of his/her class" provides poor heath care, and I KNOW there are a number of nurses online who would take exception to this.
If any of you think that med school is a breeze, I invite you to apply. And once in, I'd like to see you be at "the top of the class" consistently. And if not, I'd LOVE to hear your opinions as to whether the "top of the class" equates to "best physician". Until then, if you don't like what you hear from your health care practitioner, get a second opinion.
Sorry if this sounds harsh - in my chosen profession, I was not at the top of my class. Those who were were actively cheating during exams (some were caught, some not) or choosing the exams that they would fail in order to write a supplemental exam 3 months later (without detriment to their class standing) or were Mormon in a predominantly Mormon faculty (and thereby "earned" some leeway, which was obvious to those of us who weren't Mormon). Does this make them "better" than me? I doubt it. At least I earned my way honestly. And I stand my by professional skills (20 years of honest, ethical, and successful work). AND I challenge those of you who judge in this manner to take a long look at the successes in your life, and examine how you would feel if your abilities were judged in such a high-handed manner.

I meant no disrespect to you personally. All I was saying, is that not all medical professionals are equal-even if they carry the exact same degree. There are wonderful and basically "crappy" professionals in every single field out there.

I wasn't saying that test scores/grades were the only thing that make a doctor good or bad- I was only using it as an EXAMPLE of how 10 people can have the same exact job, but it doesn't mean they are equally good at it.

MariaOfColumbia
02-20-2007, 11:40 AM
It was a *JOKE*! :rolleyes:

Albeit, one with a sting of truth....

I've had good doctors and bad doctors, and have no idea of what their class standings were. The point was, an "M.D." or any other string of letters after one's name does not make one infalliable- it just means they got through the coursework. Get a second opinion if their advice bothers you, or a third and a fourth.

*Serenades everyone with Weird Al's "Like a Surgeon" sung to Madonna's tune "Like a Virgin" * :D

I finally made it through med school
Somehow I made it through
I'm just an intern
I still make a mistake or two

I was last in my class
Barely passsed at the institute
Now I'm trying to avoid, yah I'm trying to avoid
A malpractise suit

Hey, like a surgeon
Cuttin' for the very first time
Like a surgeon
Organ transplants are my line

Better give me all your gause nurse
This patient's fading fast
Complications have set in
Don't know how long he'll last

Let me see, that I.V.
Here we go - time to operate
I'll pull his insides out, pull his insides out
And see what he ate

Like a surgeon, hey
Cuttin' for the very first time
Like a surgeon
Here's a waiver for you to sign

Woe, woe, woe
Woe, woe, woe
Woe, woe, woe

It's a fact - I'm a quack
The disgrace of the A.M.A.
'Cause my patients die, yah my patients die
Before they can pay

Like a surgeon, hey
Cuttin' for the very first time
Like a surgeon
Got your kidneys on my mind

Like a surgeon, ooh-hoo like a surgeon
When I reach inside
With my scalpel, and my forceps, and retractors
Oh ho, oh ho

Ooh baby, yah
I can hear your heartbeat
For the very last time

aphil
02-20-2007, 12:05 PM
I agree there is s sting of truth...the OBGYN with my first child almost killed me. He made the very serious mistake of making me have my daughter naturally when he KNEW she was large. (Off the charts percentile wise, in weight, frame, length, etc.)

Rather than the c-section I begged for, I ended up with a hairline fracture in my hipbones and my daughter ended up with a shoulder injury-because he chose to do a vacuum extraction instead. (Her shoulders were wider than my hipbones, and it injured us both when he forced her shoulders through my too small bone frame.)

Afterwards, I had to have emergency surgery-which he started BEFORE giving me anesthesia-until he realized why I was yelling. He also seemed to forget that my husband was in the room for a while witnessing it. :o

Beach Patrol
02-20-2007, 02:32 PM
I agree there is s sting of truth...the OBGYN with my first child almost killed me. He made the very serious mistake of making me have my daughter naturally when he KNEW she was large. (Off the charts percentile wise, in weight, frame, length, etc.)

Rather than the c-section I begged for, I ended up with a hairline fracture in my hipbones and my daughter ended up with a shoulder injury-because he chose to do a vacuum extraction instead. (Her shoulders were wider than my hipbones, and it injured us both when he forced her shoulders through my too small bone frame.)

Afterwards, I had to have emergency surgery-which he started BEFORE giving me anesthesia-until he realized why I was yelling. He also seemed to forget that my husband was in the room for a while witnessing it. :o

Geez!!! Are you SURE he was a doctor at all???? He sounds like a blazing idiot!

aphil
02-20-2007, 02:45 PM
I actually walked with a slight limp for a couple of months after her birth...

Yes, he was an idiot. There was a very lengthy process in filing formal complaints legally with him...

Nonetheless, my next two babies were monitored very closely for size, and my next baby was induced a month early (a 9lb 4 oz preemie) and my recent son was 9lbs 3oz. I went into labor naturally with him, though-also at 36 weeks instead of 40. They would have both been an estimated 11 1/4 pounds full term.
Both boys were also large framed-but I had them just small enough that I could deliver naturally.

ennay
02-20-2007, 02:56 PM
Hey my first OB was a quack too! only it was a she so probably not the same quack.

but dang those are some big babies aphil!

MariaOfColumbia
02-20-2007, 03:43 PM
Yikes! And I was mad because the doctor had me pushing too soon with my third baby, and she went back in, instead of out. That's nothing, I can see now!

9+ lbs at 8 months! WOW. That's amazing. And that doctor should have lost his license for that...

aphil
02-20-2007, 03:58 PM
Well, he didn't. All I can do is warn pretty much every pregnant woman in the county that he practices in... :lol:

Which I DO. :)

JessicaBT
02-23-2007, 01:49 AM
What bothers me about this is that she acted annoyed at your question, when you were paying her to answer your questions. You don't need that. I hope she just lost your business, and your referrals.

Every chiropractor I have been to went to medical school, and then EXTRA training to be a chiropractor. Maybe they don't all have to do that. I don't know. But to me, that means they know everything a general practitioner does, and then some. Doctors will often give you pain meds to mask a symptom, and then you have to go to a chiro to fix the cause of the problem. Of course doctors think chiros are all quacks. If you don't keep having the symptoms to treat, because the cause of the problem has been fixed, guess who isn't getting as much business? Make no mistake, healthcare in this country is run as a business, focused on the bottom line. I hate it, but it's true.

JessicaBT
02-23-2007, 01:57 AM
And this is almost totally off topic, but right before I signed in here and read THIS thread, I was reading a very similar thread on my sleep apnea support site, so I just got a whole big dose of these stories at once. I'm not sure if this is against any rules? But I'm going to post the link to the thread I was just reading.
(If for any bizarre reason, you're interested in reading the other thread about doctors I just read, I'd skip the original article if you don't have sleep apnea, cause it was boring.)

http://www.apneasupport.org/about7383.html