Weight Loss Support - Yuck! I'm supposed to have 3 C of milk per day




cbmare
01-30-2007, 01:30 PM
I looked at the new food pyramid and I'm thinking that it may be something that is easy to follow. It says I should be having 3 cups of milk products per day. I don't care for many milk products. I do like cottage cheese, so maybe some FF cottage cheese with a handful of blueberries on it would be good. That would take some of the fruit requirement down (1.5 C) as well. I do have 1 or 2% on my Kashi cereal in the mornings, but not a cup!

I don't drink coffee.

Maybe I should go back to LF chocolate milk in the AM as well as my cereal. I cut it out because of the cholesterol and calories. I gave up soy milk because of the soy and women's health.

Any suggestions?


Clydegirl
01-30-2007, 01:37 PM
I always have ovaltine made with milk in the evening.

midwife
01-30-2007, 01:40 PM
Humans are the only mammals that consume milk products after childhood. And it's a different species' milk, no less.

I like milk, cheese, yogurt, etc., don't get me wrong, but adult humans do not need milk. It is possible to get the protein, calcium, etc. from other foods.

Often government recommendations are influenced by industry, and the dairy industry has some $$$$.


jillybean720
01-30-2007, 01:55 PM
I love milk, so 3 cups of milk products a day would be cake for me ;) I have milk on cereal (I DO use 1 cup of milk--I'm one of those weird people that prefers my cereal slightly soggy instead of crunchy). I use skim milk to make sugar-free instant pudding. I love cheese on just about anything (limited quantities, of course, and usually a reduced-fat version--can't handle the fat-free stuff, though).

If you want chocolate milk, maybe try skim milk and a fat-free chocolate syrup? It will still have some sugar (they do make a sugar-free chocolate syrup, but I find it doesn't mix in as well), but it shouldn't have any fat.

Oooh, I also really really like the Carnation instant breakfast mixes. You just mix an envelope of the powder with 1 cup of milk, and, IMO, it really tastes like chocolate milk, plus you can get the no sugar added kind, and it has additional nutrients that you wouldn't get with the chocolate syrup.

Glory87
01-30-2007, 02:02 PM
I don't eat a lot of dairy. I don't consider the food pyramid to be a health bible. Check out Marion Nestle's Food Politics (http://www.amazon.com/Food-Politics-Influences-Nutrition-California/dp/0520240677/sr=8-1/qid=1170183734/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/002-4539402-4404814?ie=UTF8&s=books) for some interesting reading about how the food industry/lobbyists shapes the pyramid. It's not always in the public's best interest - you can be sure it's in the DAIRY INDUSTRY'S best industry for you to drink 3 cups of milk a day.

nelie
01-30-2007, 02:09 PM
I don't eat a lot of dairy either. I eat occasional cottage cheese and yogurt as well as very little cheese.

cbmare
01-30-2007, 02:10 PM
Oh, I'm well aware of how the food pyramid changes based on what needs to happen in the agricultural industry. However, this new one seems to be a bit different. They are basing it on age and activity. For me, they recommend milk and meat/beans at the bottom of the list. They recommend grains at the top, but only 5 ounces. However, I do have to watch that. I have diverticulitis and it can be a problem.


I was drinking the fat free chocolate milk. I enjoyed some of that each morning. Maybe I'll go back to it. I do miss it.

healthytoad
01-30-2007, 02:11 PM
from the mypyramid.gov site, what counts as a cup of milk:

Milk
[choose fat-free or low-fat milk most often] 1 cup
1 half-pint container
½ cup evaporated milk

Yogurt
[choose fat-free or low-fat yogurt most often] 1 regular container (8 fluid ounces) = 1 cup
1 small container (6 ounces) = ¾ cup
1 snack size container (4 ounces) = ½ cup

Cheese
[choose low-fat cheeses most often]
1 ½ ounces hard cheese (cheddar, mozzarella, Swiss, parmesan)
1/3 cup shredded cheese
1 slice of hard cheese is equivalent to ½ cup milk
2 ounces processed cheese (American)
½ cup ricotta cheese
1 slice of processed cheese is equivalent to 1/3 cup milk
2 cups cottage cheese (½ cup cottage cheese is equivalent to ¼ cup milk)

Milk-based desserts
[choose fat-free or low-fat types most often]
1 cup pudding made with milk
1 cup frozen yogurt
1 ½ cups ice cream
1 scoop ice cream is equivalent to 1/3 cup milk

midwife
01-30-2007, 02:20 PM
I love Marion Nestle and second the recommendation for her book. I heard her speak once and would jump at the chance to hear her again.

Puncezilla
01-30-2007, 02:22 PM
Put a cup of milk in the blender with some frozen berries ( sweeten it if you like, depending on the sweetness of the beries) frozen Banana is good to then you'r getting fruit and milk.

rockinrobin
01-30-2007, 02:54 PM
I remember when my MIL went to her Dr. and told her she must drink 2 cups of milk a day. She said "Then I'll be needing an awful lot of coffee". :D

healthytoad
01-30-2007, 03:02 PM
http://www.3aday.org/3aDay/RecipesAndSnacks/DoingDairyEveryDay.htm

fiddler
01-30-2007, 03:06 PM
Humans are the only mammals that consume milk products after childhood. And it's a different species' milk, no less.

I like milk, cheese, yogurt, etc., don't get me wrong, but adult humans do not need milk. It is possible to get the protein, calcium, etc. from other foods.

Often government recommendations are influenced by industry, and the dairy industry has some $$$$.

Here's an article from the Harvard School of Public Health that backs up midwife's assertions: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/calcium.html

Glory87
01-30-2007, 04:04 PM
I love Marion Nestle and second the recommendation for her book. I heard her speak once and would jump at the chance to hear her again.

I just checked What to Eat (http://www.amazon.com/What-Eat-Marion-Nestle/dp/0865477043/sr=8-1/qid=1170191079/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/002-4539402-4404814?ie=UTF8&s=books) out of library - it is some seriously good stuff.

alinnell
01-30-2007, 04:14 PM
I just read a wonderful article that quoted Nestle:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/28/magazine/28nutritionism.t.html?pagewanted=print

One of the things that the article also mentioned was to eat food rather than the "edible foodlike substances" in the supermarket. Great euphemism for processed food!

slimmernow
01-30-2007, 04:48 PM
I looked at the new food pyramid and I'm thinking that it may be something that is easy to follow. It says I should be having 3 cups of milk products per day. I don't care for many milk products. I do like cottage cheese, so maybe some FF cottage cheese with a handful of blueberries on it would be good. That would take some of the fruit requirement down (1.5 C) as well. I do have 1 or 2% on my Kashi cereal in the mornings, but not a cup!

I don't drink coffee.

Maybe I should go back to LF chocolate milk in the AM as well as my cereal. I cut it out because of the cholesterol and calories. I gave up soy milk because of the soy and women's health.

Any suggestions?

I find fromage frais makes a great mayo alternative - for things like tuna and sweetcorn (perhaps in a pitta or on a jacket potato) or chicken or salad - it's milk based so could help towards your daily intake.

healthytoad
01-30-2007, 04:51 PM
great article! I love that bit about not eating anything your great grandmother wouldn't recognize as food lol But than, my great grandmother was a southern dairy farmer! :)

fiddler
01-30-2007, 04:57 PM
I just read a wonderful article that quoted Nestle:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/28/magazine/28nutritionism.t.html?pagewanted=print

One of the things that the article also mentioned was to eat food rather than the "edible foodlike substances" in the supermarket. Great euphemism for processed food!

One of my pet peeves for years now has been how little food is sold in the supermarket. 90% of what is there are items I don't consider food. Conversely, I'm distressed by how many people, when confronted with a relatively common food item (a turnip, for example) have no idea what it is or what to do with it. :?:

ennay
01-30-2007, 04:57 PM
yadda yadda, eat what works for you and take viactiv if you dont get enough calcium and vit-d through food

sharonrr
01-30-2007, 04:59 PM
Hi What is the concern of women's health and soy milk? I just googled it and everything I came up with was positive not negative.
Thank you
Sharon

ennay
01-30-2007, 05:05 PM
Truthfully, the soy thing has been blown out of proportion. Soy is a plant estrogen. For awhile they were talking about how great it was based on the health and diet of people in Japan where it is a regular part of their life. So in typical american fashion some people decided that if a little is good, then a lot must be better. So they started making things with concentrated soy isoflavones. And some people started ingesting mega doses

Lo and behold there was a study that found that excessive intake of soy isoflavones was detrimental to health. so in typical alarmist fashion the word went out that if a lot is bad, then a normal amount must be also.

sharonrr
01-30-2007, 05:08 PM
:) Thanks for the information. I'll keep drinking my soy protein shakes. I'm sure they are much healthier than having a shake from a fast food restaurant.
Sharon

ennay
01-30-2007, 05:25 PM
Its all about moderation. No one food should be used to excess.

Oh by the way, the connection was with thyroid function..so I guess if I had documented thyroid disease I might avoid soy just to be hyper vigilant.

nelie
01-30-2007, 05:29 PM
I avoid soy partially because of the thyroid function issue. I still eat soy products but less often than I used to. I now use unsweetened almond milk instead of soy milk and I use whey protein powders instead of soy.

ennay
01-30-2007, 05:35 PM
soy protein powder might be one I would avoid just because it is a super concentrated form of soy.

but I've seen people avoiding edemame - you would have to eat a darn lot of edemame to get an overdose of soy

cbmare
01-30-2007, 05:48 PM
Truthfully, the soy thing has been blown out of proportion. Soy is a plant estrogen. For awhile they were talking about how great it was based on the health and diet of people in Japan where it is a regular part of their life. So in typical american fashion some people decided that if a little is good, then a lot must be better. So they started making things with concentrated soy isoflavones. And some people started ingesting mega doses

Lo and behold there was a study that found that excessive intake of soy isoflavones was detrimental to health. so in typical alarmist fashion the word went out that if a lot is bad, then a normal amount must be also.

I'm glad you said this. I think one of my first posts on here was regarding soy. I should go look and refresh my memory on what people said.

I love edamame. I limit soy sauce because of the sodium, but then again, a TLBS while cooking isn't that bad when it is for more than 1 person. I'm not a big tofu fan unless it is in hot and sour soup or disguised some way.

So maybe I WILL go back to my chocolate soy milk in the AM. Well, depending on the price. Sometimes LF or FF chocolate milk is much cheaper.

phantastica
01-30-2007, 05:51 PM
Humans are the only mammals that consume milk products after childhood. And it's a different species' milk, no less.

I thought this to be true as well, that we didn't need to supplement our diets with dairy beyond childhood, but someone else pointed out to me that animals (who don't drink milk after childhood) still get their calcium by chewing on the bones of their prey. We don't always do that as humans, so I wonder if there is some validity to adding dairy?

Glory87
01-30-2007, 06:06 PM
What bones do deer chew onto get calcium? ;)

I was just kidding - but there are tons of non-animal sources of calcium like broccoli, spinach, soy, kale, etc.

http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/calcium.htm#table1

ennay
01-30-2007, 06:21 PM
The more protein you ingest the more calcium you need. Can't remember why. Which is why the vegetarian deer dont need to eat bones, but the carnivores do ;)

AquaWarlock
01-30-2007, 06:53 PM
I read that Nutritionism article by Pollan (author of "Omnivore's Dilemma") too in the NY Times magazine and found it to be great stuff - much in the vein of Marion Nestle's "Food Politics" and "What to Eat?" (which I recommended on a 3FC thread somewhere) - but the basic idea is that people have been living long and healthfully eating a varied diet uncomplicated by what specific nutrient and food to worry/obsess about, the only real standards needed are eat less (for American standards), eat light, lots of veggies/fruits and less meat/dairy.

midwife
01-30-2007, 07:14 PM
I thought this to be true as well, that we didn't need to supplement our diets with dairy beyond childhood, but someone else pointed out to me that animals (who don't drink milk after childhood) still get their calcium by chewing on the bones of their prey. We don't always do that as humans, so I wonder if there is some validity to adding dairy?

I hadn't considered that, but those animals that chew on bones probably don't eat a lot of green leafy veggies. Also, you could eat sardines for the calcium. They have bones.

There are many non-dairy ways to get calcium, so if someone doesn't like milk, there are many options. "Musts", "shoulds" and "have-tos" (especially from the government upon an individual) make me nervous and bring out my contrary side. ;)