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Old 09-16-2010, 12:14 AM   #14
kaplods
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Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Wausau, WI
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Hubby and I were thriftstore and antique shop shopping today and I found two Weight Watcher's exchange cookbooks. I wish I'd bought both, but the one I bought did have exchange program information.

It's Weight Watchers' Quick Success Program Cookbook by Jean Nidetch (1988)

The first week's program for women is very similar to emaline29's except in the protein (the older program is higher in protein and lower in carb. the 3 - 4 oz servings would be equivalent to about 60 exchanges of protein per week (8-9 daily). There alre also differences for men and youths. The liver meal is no longer mandatory and the recommendations are a bit different. Also, there are changes as the weeks progress (to be honest, I really think this is a marketing ploy more than it is essential to success. The "quick start" aspect is appealing to people, and by making changes to the program every week for at least five weeks, means that people will be more motivated to stick it out at least for the first five weeks to get the whole program before trying to do it at home alone. By then, they hope to have you hooked on the meetings. There's nothing wrong with that at all from a business standpoint, but a savvy consumer takes it into account).

One thing to consider is that the version emaline29 lists, comes to about 1400 calories a day. Whereas the Week 1 of the 1988 program only has 900 - 975 calories (without the optional 150 calories). Without the optional calories, you're not even breaking 1000 calories, which no doubt it did give people a nice, impressive first week weight loss, but there's no reason you should have to go that low (and I don't think any subsequent WW plans ever went that low again - at least not in my memory. I suspect I joined every WW plan incarnation available from 1974 - 1994. From age 8 to 28, every time WW advertised a new plan, my mother and I would join - together when we lived in the same town, and when we lived apart, when one of us would join, the other would join immediately upon hearing about it.



Anyway the plan in this book as listed (counts in parenthesis are for men and youths, except for the milk exchanges. In which case men get the same as women, and only the youth count is in parenthesis).

Floating Exchanges - allow you to add an extra exchange to your Daily Totals. Each day (after week 5) you can choose one exchange from either the fruit, protein, bread, or milk exchanges.

Week 1

Fruit 2-3 (3-4)
Veg 3, at least
Fat 3 (3)
Protein 5-6 (7-8)
Bread 2 (4)
Milk 2 (3)

Optional:
Floating 0 (0)
Optional calories 150


Week 2

Fruit 2-3 (3-4)
Veg 3, at least
Fat 3 (3)
Protein 5-6 (7-8)
Bread 2-3 (4-5)
Milk 2 (3)

Optional:
Floating 0 (0)
Optional calories 200



Week 3

Fruit 2-3 (3-5)
Veg 3, at least
Fat 3 (3)
Protein 5-6 (7-8)
Bread 2-3 (4-5)
Milk 2 (3-4)

Optional:
Floating 0 (0)
Optional calories 300


Week 4

Fruit 2-3 (3-5)
Veg 3, at least
Fat 3 (3)
Protein 5-6 (7-8)
Bread 3 (5)
Milk 2 (3-4)

Optional:
Floating 0 (0)
Optional calories 400


Week 5 and onward

Fruit 2-3 (3-5)
Veg 3, at least
Fat 3 (3)
Protein 5-6 (7-8)
Bread 3 (5)
Milk 2 (3-4)

Optional:
Floating 1 (1)
Optional calories 500


Guidelines:

No more than 3 eggs
No more than 4 oz of hard or semisoft cheese ("slicing" cheese. Cottage cheese would be ok any time)
No more than 12 ounces of limited meats (red meats such as lamb, beef, and pork).
Between 9 and 15 ounces of fish or shellfish



Another feature of the plan (which I also think is marketing rather than logically/success driven) is that the food lists are expanded each week to include more variety within the exchanges (but the calories are still similar)

For example, you're given a large variety of veggies to choose from for week 1

Week 2: cardoon, eggplant, and sprouts are added to the week 1 list

Week 3: beets, brussel sprouts, fennel, kohlrabi, pickles, and pumpkin are added

Week 4: snow peas, veg juices( limit 1 exchange daily), carrot, sauerkraut, tomato sauce/puree/ paste are added

week 5: 23 more veggies are added including greens, artichokes, winter melon, jicama, okra, rhubarb, Rutabagas, and turnips, and others.



Every list has new additions each week. Because the carb and calorie contents are still quite similar, there won't be a calorie difference in your exchange choices. There doesn't seem to be any rhyme or reason to the additions. For example, it makes sense that dried fruits are added last - they're easier ot overeat. But if that's the rationale, it doesn't follow through. The main goal it seems is to give you a reward for sticking with the plan, by giving you more to choose from. For most of the exchange groups, the lists of new foods to be added gets progressively larger. Week 1 is the largest (or second largest), Week 2 offers a handful of additions, Week 3 is an even larger list, Week 4 even larger and week 5's list is nearly as large or larger than Week 1's.

The calorie levels are all the same, though so there's really no need to worry about what is on each lists unless you're anal about such things (and if that's the case - LOL, you can buy the book, because I'm tired of typing).
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Last edited by kaplods; 09-16-2010 at 12:55 AM.
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