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will too much protein kill me?

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Old 07-05-2008, 02:43 PM   #1
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A competition bodybuilder told me to use protein shakes (Whey and Caseins) 2-3 times a day and the rest of the time eat frozen (nuke them) veggies like brocolli, steamed Tilapia 2-3 oz. and the same for chicken breast fillets.

So far in less than three weeks I have lost 13-15 lbs. and not been hungry or felt deprived or had any cravings...

But does anyone know if this will (in the long run) harm me? This friend says he does it to drop any body fat before his competitions and it has never failed him...

Any helpful advice or suggestions are welcomed!
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Old 07-05-2008, 02:46 PM   #2
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Too much of anything isn't good.

That being said, eating green veggies and lean proteins is a good way to eat for a lot of people.

Remember that we need good fats too and when eliminating variety in your diet, supplementation is suggested.
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Old 07-05-2008, 02:48 PM   #3
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Too much protein can be pretty hard on your liver and kidneys. The more immediate concern, though, is that by cutting carbs that severely, you risk regaining the weight pretty fast when you go back to 'normal' eating. There's no way to sustain that low carb forever, and without whole grains you're not getting a balanced diet.
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Old 07-05-2008, 02:50 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by thistoo View Post
The more immediate concern, though, is that by cutting carbs that severely, you risk regaining the weight pretty fast when you go back to 'normal' eating. There's no way to sustain that low carb forever, and without whole grains you're not getting a balanced diet.
Well, there are quite a few low carbers on this board even who would disagree!

Some people just make an entirely different lifestyle and dietary change and do quite well.
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Old 07-05-2008, 02:52 PM   #5
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Well, there are quite a few low carbers on this board even who would disagree!

Some people just make an entirely different lifestyle and dietary change and do quite well.
I am low carbing myself since I am insulin resistant. But the OP's post makes it sound like she's taking in no carbs at all, and that's pretty hard to sustain.
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Old 07-05-2008, 02:57 PM   #6
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I am low carbing myself since I am insulin resistant. But the OP's post makes it sound like she's taking in no carbs at all, and that's pretty hard to sustain.
Broccoli and other green veggies have carbs.

I know of people who (long term) eat 50 or less grams of net carbs daily, getting most of the carbs from green vegetables. It *is* something that takes dedication, but it *is* possible.

I think many people who ar IR find low carbing, controlled carbing or low GI the best way to live.

It works really well for those who have addictions to foods too.
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Old 07-05-2008, 02:58 PM   #7
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Here's an an ammendment to my post...
I am taking a daily vitamin
I am not sure about carbs
Q: Is brown rice okay?

*any suggestions about which carbs? I thought that veggies like corn and peas contain carbs enough for energy?
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Old 07-05-2008, 03:08 PM   #8
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Here's another question...carbs are for energy, right?
I have not felt a lack of energy thus far.

And I do plan to try to live by this cleaner way of eating...minus the liquid protein after awhile and just veggies, fish andchicken...all of which I love.
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Old 07-05-2008, 03:38 PM   #9
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I eat pretty heavy protein, lighter carbs. My carbs also come from fibrous vegetables, no flour or sugar. I've never considered myself low carb, although my diet probably qualifies as one.

I sort of go by Burn the Fat, Feed the Muscle's principles on grading carbs. There are good carbohydrates, okay ones and less desirable ones. I eat pretty clean, so my carbohydrates usually make an 'A' grade. To answer your question, brown rice gets an 'A' grade under the guidelines of this book.

I also take protein shakes, take vitamins, eat plenty of fish and poultry.

Losing 15 pounds in three weeks is likely a result of beginning a new diet - BTW- CONGRATULATIONS!, losing some water weight, ect. If it continues at that rate you'd obviously want to look over your plan and adjust from there, as 5 pounds per week is pretty intense.

I don't think this way of eating is unsustainable. Eating lean proteins and getting healthy carbs from whole grains and vegetables works well for me. I don't find this restrictive at all, it seems natural. A typical dinner is a chicken breast or fish, veggies and a salad. YUM, imo. I think of this way of eating based both on protein and volume. I like to be satisfied with the volume of veggies!

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Old 07-05-2008, 03:42 PM   #10
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Carbs are for energy?

I wouldn't say that you cannot, practically simplify to this extent. All carbohydrate sources are not created equally, neither fats nor proteins. Foods provide macronutrients (fat, protein, carbohydrate) generally in a combination, and also provide micronutrients (vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals, antioxidants....)

I think consulting a dietitian, or at least maybe reading a good basic nutriton book, might be helpful. There is some controversy on "optimal" nutrition and what that means for individuals and groups of people, so I'm not sure you'll ever get a "straight" answer that doesn't disagree with someone else's, even given they have the same qualifications and authority to give a respectable opinion.

As for reducing carbs, I think it is a myth that the food plan is unsustainable. Difficult to sustain, given our carb-overloaded society, absolutely! I would even agree with "nearly impossible" to sustain, but for myself I've learned that it is the ONLY plan that doesn't leave me wanting to eat absolutely everything in sight.

I think what makes most "diets," or to use the more politically correct term WOE (way of eating), difficult to sustain, is not the nature of the food plan, but the expectation (even if half-heartedly held) that the WOE for maintenance will be significantly different than the WOE needed for weight loss.

For most people, this isn't true. Weight maintenance needs as much effort, if not more than weight loss. Another huge barrier to weight loss/maintenance success is the idea that perfection is necessary for progress. It is customary, in this culture, to view lapses in faithfullness to a food plan, as a sign of failure, and a signal to abandon it. If I can't "stick to" a plan, I'm expected to give it up.

I have chosen to restrict carbs because I am insulin resistant and two doctors I respect, suggested it. The greater part, is that I find it the only plan that has ever, in any way, curbed my freakishly large appetite. I also know that if I were to stop following the WOE (or perhaps I should more accurately say "when" since I've often done so), I will stop losing and could even regain. Over and over, I've proven to myself that this has to be a WOE for life. That doesn't mean that how many carbs I can eat to maintain (or lose) won't change over the course of my life, but I know that I will always have to monitor it. I will never be able to eat "whatever I want, whenever I want."

Part of the long-term "failure" of low carb plans (and any plan for that matter) may be in people not realizing they will have to always monitor their progress and adapt as necessary. Many "low carb" plans minimize the importance of portion control or "counting" of calories, exchanges... However, I learned that for myself, I will probably always need a backup plan, because of my abnormal response to food. It will always be a struggle, and it will always take comittment and vigilance, and I will always learn from my mistakes. And I will continue to make many, but if I can keep in mind that progress, not perfection, and constant (re)evaluation of that progress will be necessary.

There is no "vacation" from this (at least, not without consequences), which is as true for any other WOE as much as for the low-carber.
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Old 07-05-2008, 03:43 PM   #11
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BTW - How many calories, grams of protein and carbs are you eating in a typical day? That'd help define how much is too much.
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Old 07-05-2008, 03:46 PM   #12
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Quote:
Part of the long-term "failure" of low carb plans (and any plan for that matter) may be in people not realizing they will have to always monitor their progress and adapt as necessary. Many "low carb" plans minimize the importance of portion control or "counting" of calories, exchanges... However, I learned that for myself, I will probably always need a backup plan, because of my abnormal response to food. It will always be a struggle, and it will always take comittment and vigilance, and I will always learn from my mistakes. And I will continue to make many, but if I can keep in mind that progress, not perfection, and constant (re)evaluation of that progress will be necessary.
Yeah, kaplods, as always! The single most important aspect of my diet is to monitor my calories, constantly monitoring everything I take in, the lower carbs are secondary, close, but secondary. These two methods support each other in my success.

It certainly does take commitment and vigilance, but maintenance will too. This has been my biggest failure in the past. Somehow I thought that maintenance would mean returning to my old ways. Nope, healthy is forever, I realize it this time.

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Old 07-05-2008, 04:08 PM   #13
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Back to the protein question, sustained consumption of extremely high amounts of protein *may* cause issues with your kidneys. In studies it has only been problematic with people who already have kidney issues ... in healthy adults, lots of protein seems to be quite fine.

But "extremely high amounts" is subject to debate. As much as 1 g per lb of bodyweight seems to be considered a reasonable amount - if more than most people get on average.

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Old 07-05-2008, 04:10 PM   #14
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In answer to what have I been eating every day...
Breakfast @6am: 1 scoop Caseins protein about 22 grams / 100-110 calories (in water or I add instant coffee and sweatner to about 10 oz. of cold water)
*Note: I really LIKE the taste of the shake and it keeps me feeling full until noon.
Lunch is another shake I have pre-made and brought along to work
(but if I am at home I eat about four cups of "Asian style veggies" and nuke a pre package 2oz. portion of Tilapia and mix it all together) The large portion of veggies fills me up until dinner
Dinner: More nuked frozen veggies about two cups (and afew pieces of watermelon here or there)
*Right before bed I make a one scoop of Caseins proteins shake and hit the bed...

So for the past three weeks this has been my routine...am I doomed?
The good thing is, I really love veggies and they are so filling...and I really like the way the shakes taste...
Best of all the 15 pound loss is encouraging to keep going...
I was wondering though about adding a 1/2 cup of brown rice at lunch with my fish? What is the benifit of doing this?

**Note: Thank you so much to everone who has posted and given of their time and knowledge.
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Old 07-05-2008, 04:15 PM   #15
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Brown rice is good - it's good for you, a strong source of complex carbs and fiber. I'm a big fan of brown rice.

I'd say you should add some protein of some kind to your dinner - it will help keep you feeling full overnight.

Other than that, I personally couldn't deal with shakes all the time - I need whole food and real food, but that's me. If you are enjoying the taste of the food you're eating and not feeling deprived, I'd say continue doing what you're doing.

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