It’s Cool to Play Games

One of the best ways a majority of us relax, stay engaged, stave off boredom, or even blow off hours at work is to play games–video games, computer games (you do know there are a few addictive games in your word program, right?), or Age of Fury 3D hack.

I own over a hundred games from the ever-wonderful bigfishgames.com. I regularly visit gaming sites on the Internet as well. One, I still check out quite a bit is actually a free - boxerjam, great name isn’t it? never mind that these are where I played my very first games online the very first time–in the early eighties–I went online. (Those were the days when you would dial in, wait while the screeeoooobongbongbong sound that would later absolutely drive up the wall).

One game that I have been playing quite a bit lately, and I am absolutely hooked on is Pogo. You can play at three but you have to put up with intermittent advertisements. But really, paying to play games at Pogo (and I’m sure at other equally fine sites) is pretty cheap anyhow if you want to go that route. Especially if you prefer to stay at home (because you find that people now drive you absolutely nuts), never spend money on anything other than food and shelter, and deserve (as every human does) the mind altering of fact that playing games affords.

Believe it or not they are actually some benefits to Lane is games other than just for its entertainment values. Let’s take a look at a few:

1.Such platforms or networks or whatever they are called these days allow games to return to their natural form. You can play games like Checkers, a version of Scrabble, or Canasta, for example, with a robot that is programmed so that you can choose them to lead skill levels that are predetermined by you. And the new avatars (mini-me cartoon representations of players/members) have very human expressions like smiles, frowns, even human like expressions that can be seen when winning a round, losing a game, conceding to a set or match.

2.In-game chat for real-time games means you get to play games and communicate with others as you play, anywhere in the world, live. You don’t hear from them three days after you emailed or snail mailed a message; you don’t wait ten minutes as if you are stoned and swearing you took way too long to answer that question; you type back and forth to people all over the world. If that’s what interests you. You can, of course, choose to either play games against the computer program itself or human counterparts of your choosing.

3. There are benefits of the previous listed points which include such things as, gaming online enhances social skills because you have to deal with others, breaks down barriers, encourages the human sentiments of empathy and sympathy (for anything important to the online/human acquaintances…life issues, feelings, attitudes about hard games or dull ones or games acting up); and, in my estimation, beats having to play games alone.

4. The miracle of online game playing systems also encourages altruism and contributes to technological knowledge development, on whatever level. People with like-minded interests tend to help others, chat, manipulate pc commands/controls, play unfamiliar games, and, in general, have a great deal of fun and are acting with each other. It’s a beautiful thing.

While we now know, too, that when you play games (of any mode and of certain types), those games help to sharpen some of our mental faculties, Alzheimer’s, and, in my coo-coo world, the insanity of such needful mental aberrations as ADD, ADHD, and OCD–though this last benefit is not necessarily empirically proven. There has been quite a bit of research done on this topic and you can bet there will be a whole lot more to come http://www.sharetrusted.com

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